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  1. The Epistemic Value of Photographs.Catharine Abell - 2010 - In Catharine Abell & Katerina Bantinaki (eds.), Philosophical Perspectives on Depiction. Oxford University Press.
    There is a variety of epistemic roles to which photographs are better suited than non-photographic pictures. Photographs provide more compelling evidence of the existence of the scenes they depict than non-photographic pictures. They are also better sources of information about features of those scenes that are easily overlooked. This chapter examines several different attempts to explain the distinctive epistemic value of photographs, and argues that none is adequate. It then proposes an alternative explanation of their epistemic value. The chapter argues (...)
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  • The Structure of Scientific Revolutions.Thomas S. Kuhn - 1962 - University of Chicago Press.
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  • Reading the Book of Nature: An Introduction to the Philosophy of Science.Peter Kosso - 1992 - Cambridge University Press.
    This is an introductory survey to the philosophy of science suitable for beginners and nonspecialists. Its point of departure is the question: why should we believe what science tells us about the world? In this attempt to justify the claims of science the book treats such topics as observation data, confirmation of theories, and the explanation of phenomena. The writing is clear and concrete with detailed examples drawn from contemporary science: solar neutrinos, the gravitational bending of light, and the creation/evolution (...)
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  • The Structure of Scientific Revolutions.Thomas Samuel Kuhn - 1962 - Chicago: University of Chicago Press.
    A scientific community cannot practice its trade without some set of received beliefs. These beliefs form the foundation of the "educational initiation that prepares and licenses the student for professional practice". The nature of the "rigorous and rigid" preparation helps ensure that the received beliefs are firmly fixed in the student's mind. Scientists take great pains to defend the assumption that scientists know what the world is like...To this end, "normal science" will often suppress novelties which undermine its foundations. Research (...)
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  • The Completeness of Scientific Theories on the Derivation of Empirical Indicators Within a Theoretical Framework : The Case of Physical Geometry.Martin Carrier - 1994 - Springer.
    Earlier in this century, many philosophers of science drew a fairly sharp distinction between theory and observation, between theoretical terms like 'mass' and 'electron', and observation terms like 'measures three meters in length' and 'is _2° Celsius'. By simply looking at our instruments we can ascertain what numbers our measurements yield. Creatures like mass are different: we determine mass by calculation; we never directly observe a mass. Nor an electron: this term is introduced in order to explain what we observe. (...)
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  • What is This Thing Called Science?Alan Francis Chalmers - 1976 - Univ. Of Queensland Press.
    Co-published with the University of Queensland Press. HPC holds rights in North America and U. S. Dependencies. Since its first publication in 1976, Alan Chalmers's highly regarded and widely read work--translated into eighteen languages--has become a classic introduction to the scientific method, known for its accessibility to beginners and its value as a resource for advanced students and scholars. In addition to overall improvements and updates inspired by Chalmers's experience as a teacher, comments from his readers, and recent developments in (...)
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  • Photography and Philosophy: Essays on the Pencil of Nature.Scott Walden (ed.) - 2010 - Wiley-Blackwell.
    Unlike the numerous texts devoted to the subject of Film Theory, this collection contains essays specifically about the art form of Still Photography and the ...
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  • Philosophical Perspectives on Depiction.Catharine Abell & Katerina Bantinaki (eds.) - 2010 - Oxford University Press.
    This volume of specially written essays by leading philosophers offers to set the agenda for the philosophy of depiction.
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  • The Engine of Visualization: Thinking Through Photography.Patrick Maynard - 1997 - Cornell University Press.
    First ever philosophy treatise on photography, analytic in approach but sensitive to photo-history, not confined to aesthetics or art (illus.), Walker Evans photo on cover. Papercover printing, Dec. 2000.
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  • The Reconfigured Eye: Visual Truth in the Post-Photographic Era.William J. Mitchell - 1994 - MIT Press.
    Continuing William Mitchell's investigations of how we understand, reason about, anduse images, The Reconfigured Eye provides the first systematic, critical analysis of the digitalimaging revolution.
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  • Talbot's Technologies: Photographic Depiction, Detection, and Reproduction.Patrick Maynard - 1989 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 47 (3):263-276.
    Philosophy's only celebration of photography's 150th, the long-neglected philosophical job of clarification: drawing basic distinctions and defining basic conceptions, including photographic depiction, photographic detection, 'photograph of', 'documentary'. More than a lexicon, it explains why photography is important, by historically characterizing it through its uses for depiction, detection, reproduction, all of which have shaped the modern world. By consideration of it as 'mechanical', the paper explains photography's differences from practices with which it shares these functions. Happy birthday, photography.
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  • The Structure of Scientific Revolutions.David Bohm - 1964 - Philosophical Quarterly 14 (57):377-379.
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  • Transparent Pictures: On the Nature of Photographic Realism.Kendall L. Walton - 1984 - Critical Inquiry 11 (2):246-277.
    That photography is a supremely realistic medium may be the commonsense view, but—as Edward Steichen reminds us—it is by no means universal. Dissenters note how unlike reality a photograph is and how unlikely we are to confuse the one with the other. They point to “distortions” engendered by the photographic process and to the control which the photographer exercises over the finished product, the opportunities he enjoys for interpretation and falsification. Many emphasize the expressive nature of the medium, observing that (...)
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  • Transparent Pictures: On the Nature of Photographic Realism.Kendall L. Walton - 1984 - Noûs 18 (1):67-72.
    That photography is a supremely realistic medium may be the commonsense view, but—as Edward Steichen reminds us—it is by no means universal. Dissenters note how unlike reality a photograph is and how unlikely we are to confuse the one with the other. They point to “distortions” engendered by the photographic process and to the control which the photographer exercises over the finished product, the opportunities he enjoys for interpretation and falsification. Many emphasize the expressive nature of the medium, observing that (...)
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  • What Is This Thing Called Science?A. F. Chalmers - 1979 - Erkenntnis 14 (3):393-404.
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  • Review of Reading the Book of Nature by Peter Kosso. [REVIEW]Robert J. Deltete - 1996 - Philosophy of Science 63 (3):475-476.
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  • Visual Representations and Confirmation.Laura Perini - 2005 - Philosophy of Science 72 (5):913-926.
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  • Photography and Representation.Roger Scruton - 1981 - Critical Inquiry 7 (3):577-603.
    It seems odd to say that photography is not a mode of representation. For a photograph has in common with a painting the property by which the painting represents the world, the property of sharing, in some sense, the appearance of its subject. Indeed, it is sometimes thought that since a photograph more effectively shares the appearance of its subject than a typical painting, photography is a better mode of representation. Photography might even be thought of as having replaced painting (...)
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  • The Truth in Pictures.Laura Perini - 2005 - Philosophy of Science 72 (1):262-285.
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  • Working Light.Patrick Maynard - 2010 - Philosophy of Photography 1 (1):29-34.
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  • Bild, Darstellung, Zeichen. Philosophische Theorien bildhafter Darstellung.Oliver R. Scholz - 1992 - Tijdschrift Voor Filosofie 54 (2):341-342.
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  • Photographs as Evidence.Aaron Meskin & Jonathan Cohen - 2008 - In Scott Walden (ed.), Photography and Philosophy: Essays on the Pencil of Nature. Blackwell.
    Photographs furnish evidence. This is true in both formal and informal contexts. The use of photographs as legal evidence goes back to the very earliest days of photography, and they have been used in American trials since around the time of the Civil War. Photographs may also serve as historical evidence (for example, about the Civil War). And they serve in informal contexts as evidence about all sorts of things, such as what we and our loved ones looked like in (...)
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