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  1. The Messianic Reduction: Walter Benjamin and the Shape of Time.Peter Fenves - 2010 - Stanford University Press.
    _The Messianic Reduction_ is a groundbreaking study of Walter Benjamin's thought. Fenves places Benjamin's early writings in the context of contemporaneous philosophy, with particular attention to the work of Bergson, Cohen, Husserl, Frege, and Heidegger. By concentrating on a neglected dimension of Benjamin's friendship with Gershom Scholem, who was a student of mathematics before he became a scholar of Jewish mysticism, Fenves shows how mathematical research informs Benjamin's reflections on the problem of historical time. In order to capture the character (...)
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  • Das Princip der Infinitesimal-Methode Und Seine Geschichte.Hermann Cohen - 1883 - Berlin: Dümmler.
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  • The Basic Problems of Phenomenology.Martin Heidegger - 1982 - Indiana University Press.
    Continues and extends explorations begun in Being and Time.
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  • Kants Theorie der Erfahrung.Hermann Cohen - 1871 - Berlin: Ferd. Dümmler.
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  • The Messianic Reduction: Walter Benjamin and the Shape of Time.Peter Fenves - 2010 - Stanford University Press.
    Introduction : the course of the argument -- Substance poem versus function poem : two poems of Friedrich Hölderlin -- Entering the phenomenological school and discovering the color of shame -- Existence toward space : two "Rainbows" from around 1916 -- The problem of historical time : conversing with Scholem, criticizing Heidegger in 1916 -- Meaning in the proper sense of the word : "On language as such and on human language" and related logico-linguistic studies -- Pure knowledge and the (...)
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  • Europe, or the Infinite Task: A Study of a Philosophical Concept.Rodolphe Gasché - 2008 - Stanford University Press.
    Edmund Husserl. Infinite tasks -- Universality and spatial form -- Universality in the making -- Martin Heidegger. Singular essence -- The strangeness of beginnings -- The originary world of tragedy -- Jan Patoka. Care of the soul -- The genealogy of Europe-responsibility -- Jacques Derrida. European memories -- This little thing that is Europe -- De-closing the horizon.
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  • The Test Drive.Avital Ronell - 2007 - University of Illinois Press.
    _The Test Drive_ deals with the war perpetrated by highly determined reactionary forces on science and research. How does the government at once promote and prohibit scientific testing and undercut the importance of experimentation? To what extent is testing at the forefront of theoretical and practical concerns today? Addressed to those who are left stranded by speculative thinking and unhinged by cognitive discourse, _The Test Drive_ points to a toxic residue of uninterrogated questions raised by Nietzsche, Husserl and Derrida. Ranging (...)
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  • The Basic Problems of Phenomenology.M. Heidegger - 1982 - In Trans Albert Hofstadter (ed.).
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  • Kant's Theory of Experience at the End of the War: Scholem and Benjamin Read Cohen.Julia Ng - 2012 - Modern Language Notes 127 (3):462-484.
    At the end of one side of a manuscript entitled “On Kant” and housedin the Scholem Archive in Jerusalem, one reads the following pro-nouncement: “it is impossible to understand Kant today.” 1 Whatever it might mean to “understand” Kant, or indeed, whatever “Kant” is heremeant to be understood, it is certain, according to the manuscript,that such understanding cannot come about by way of purporting tohave returned to or spoken in the name of “Kant.” For “[t]oday,” sothe document begins, “there are (...)
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