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Dangerous Voices: On Written and Spoken Discourse in Plato’s Protagoras

In Olof Pettersson & Vigdis Vigdis Songe-Møller (eds.), Plato’s Protagoras: Essays on the Confrontation of Philosophy and Sophistry. Springer. pp. 177-198 (2017)

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  1. What Do the Arguments in the Protagoras Amount To?Vasilis Politis - 2012 - Phronesis 57 (3):209-239.
    Abstract The main thesis of the paper is that, in the coda to the Protagoras (360e-end), Plato tells us why and with what justification he demands a definition of virtue: namely, in order to resolve a particular aporia . According to Plato's assessment of the outcome of the arguments of the dialogue, the principal question, whether or not virtue can be taught , has, by the end of the dialogue, emerged as articulating an aporia , in that both protagonists, Socrates (...)
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  • Socrates' Avowals of Knowledge.David Wolfsdorf - 2004 - Phronesis 49 (2):75-142.
    The paper examines Socrates' avowals and disavowals of knowledge in the standardly accepted early Platonic dialogues. All of the pertinent passages are assembled and discussed. It is shown that, in particular, alleged avowals of knowledge have been variously misinterpreted. The evidence either does not concern ethical knowledge or its interpretation has been distorted by abstraction of the passage from context or through failure adequately to appreciate the rhetorical dimensions of the context or the author's dramaturgical interests. Still, six sincere Socratic (...)
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  • Hedonism and the Divided Soul in Plato’s Protagoras.Jessica Moss - 2014 - Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 96 (3).
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  • Socrates: Physiology of a Myth. [REVIEW]Richard Kraut - 1984 - Ancient Philosophy 4 (2):246-249.
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  • Sophistry Exposed: Socrates on the Unity of Virtue in the Protagoras.Scott R. Hemmenway - 1996 - Ancient Philosophy 16 (1):1-23.
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  • Plato's Socratic Conversations: Drama and Dialectic in Three Dialogues.Michael C. Stokes - 1986 - Johns Hopkins University Press.
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  • Self-Knowledge in Plato's Phaedrus.Charles L. Griswold - 1986 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 24 (4):373-377.
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  • Plato’s Moral Theory: The Early and Middle Dialogues.Christopher Gill & T. Irwin - 1977 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 99:176-176.
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  • The Impossibility of Perfection: Socrates' Criticism of Simonides' Poem in the Protagoras.Dorothea Frede - 1986 - Review of Metaphysics 39 (4):729 - 753.
    THE CLAIM that even Plato could not say everything at once nor could have thought or worked out everything at once is, of course, a platitude. It is generally acknowledged that there is development in Plato's thought. But what the development is, is still a much fought-over question. For in spite of all scholarly efforts this intriguing question cannot be regarded as settled in a satisfactory way. This is due not only to the fact that we all look at Plato (...)
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  • The Unity of the Virtues in the "Protagoras".Gregory Vlastos - 1972 - Review of Metaphysics 25 (3):415 - 458.
    A careful reading of the initial posing of the issue to be debated with Protagoras and of its subsequent restatement when the debate resumes after a break will show that Socrates employs three distinct formulae, only the first of which answers at all closely to the term "Unity of the Virtues" which has been commonly used in the scholarly literature as a label for the position which Socrates upholds in the debate. The other two formulae, perfectly distinguishable from the first, (...)
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  • Hedonism in Plato's Protagoras.R. Hackforth - 1928 - Classical Quarterly 22 (1):39-42.
    Perhaps the most important contribution to the history of Greek philosophy that has been made during the last twenty years is to be found in the work under-taken by Professors Burnet and A. E. Taylor in reconstructing the personality of the historical Socrates. There is, by this time, fairly general agreement that it is not to Xenophon's Memorabilia but to Plato's dialogues that we must go if we are to attempt to understand what Socrates meant for his own age and (...)
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  • The Structural Unity of the Protagoras.G. M. A. Grube - 1933 - Classical Quarterly 27 (3-4):203-.
    To speak of ‘the real subject’ or ‘the primary aim’ of a Platonic dialogue usually means to magnify one aspect of it at the expense of other aspects as important. Such is not my intention. It is quite clear, however, without prejudice to the philosophic value of any of the topics discussed, that the Protagoras is an attack upon the sophists as represented by Protagoras, the greatest of them. Hippias and Prodicus are present and some of the great man's glory (...)
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  • Childish Nonsense? The Value of Interpretation in Plato's Protagoras.Franco V. Trivigno - 2013 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 51 (4):509-543.
    In the Protagoras, Plato presents us with a Puzzle regarding the value of interpretation. On the one hand, Socrates claims to find several familiar Socratic theses about morality and the human condition in his interpretation of a poem by Simonides (339e−347a). On the other hand, immediately after the interpretation, Socrates castigates the whole task of interpretation as “childish nonsense” appropriate for second-rate drinking parties (347d5−6).1 The core problem is this: taking Socrates’s interpretation of Simonides seriously requires undermining the significance of (...)
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  • Plato's Method of Dialectic.Richard Robinson, Julius Stenzel & D. J. Allan - 1941 - Philosophical Review 50 (5):542.
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  • The Written Word in Plato’s Protagoras.Raphael Woolf - 1999 - Ancient Philosophy 19 (1):21-30.
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  • Socrates on Simonides: The Use of Poetry in Socratic and Platonic Rhetoric.Marina Berzins McCoy - 1999 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 32 (4):349 - 367.
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  • Socrates and Hedonism: Protagoras 351b-358d.Donald J. Zeyl - 1980 - Phronesis 25 (3):250 - 269.
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  • Plato and the "Socratic Fallacy".William Prior - 1998 - Phronesis 43 (2):97 - 113.
    Since Peter Geach coined the phrase in 1966 there has been much discussion among scholars of the "Socratic fallacy." No consensus presently exists on whether Socrates commits the "Socratic fallacy"; almost all scholars agree, however, that the "Socratic fallacy" is a bad thing and that Socrates has good reason to avoid it. I think that this consensus of scholars is mistaken. I think that what Geach has labeled a fallacy is no fallacy at all, but a perfectly innocent consequence of (...)
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  • Socrates and Protagoras on Virtue.Denis O'Brien - 2003 - In David Sedley (ed.), Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy, Volume Xxiv: Summer 2003. Oxford University Press.
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  • A Multiform Desire.Olof Pettersson - 2013 - Dissertation, Uppsala University
    This dissertation is a study of appetite in Plato’s Timaeus, Republic and Phaedrus. In recent research is it often suggested that Plato considers appetite (i) to pertain to the essential needs of the body, (ii) to relate to a distinct set of objects, e.g. food or drink, and (iii) to cause behaviour aiming at sensory pleasure. Exploring how the notion of appetite, directly and indirectly, connects with Plato’s other purposes in these dialogues, this dissertation sets out to evaluate these ideas. (...)
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  • Dramatic Aspects of Plato's Protagoras.M. F. Burnyeat - 2013 - Classical Quarterly 63 (1):419-422.
    In the course of its 53 Stephanus pages Plato's Protagoras uses the verb διαλέγεσθαι 32 times: a frequency considerably greater than that of any other dialogue. The next largest total is 21 occurrences in the Theaetetus . In the vast bulk of the Republic διαλέγεσθαι occurs just 20 times over 294 Stephanus pages. The ratios are striking. In the Protagoras the verb turns up on average once every 1.65 Stephanus pages; in the Theaetetus once every 3.25 pages; in the Republic (...)
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  • Disputation, Deception, and Dialectic: Plato on the True Rhetoric ("Phaedrus" 261-266).James S. Murray - 1988 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 21 (4):279 - 289.
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  • Protagoras and Socrates on Courage and Pleasure.Daniel C. Russell - 2000 - Ancient Philosophy 20 (2):311-338.
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  • Plato's Earlier Dialectic.Richard Robinson - 1953 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 15 (3):436-437.
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  • Can Virtue Be Bought?EUgene Garver - 2004 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 37 (4):353-382.
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  • Socrates on the Parts of Virtue.Paul Woodruff - 1976 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 6 (sup1):101-116.
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  • Socrates and the Unity of the Virtues.Thomas C. Brickhouse & Nicholas D. Smith - 1997 - The Journal of Ethics 1 (4):311-324.
    In the Protagoras, Socrates argues that each of the virtue-terms refers to one thing (: 333b4). But in the Laches (190c8–d5, 199e6–7), Socrates claims that courage is a proper part of virtue as a whole, and at Euthyphro 11e7–12e2, Socrates says that piety is a proper part of justice. But A cannot be both identical to B and also a proper part of B – piety cannot be both identical to justice and also a proper part of justice. In this (...)
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  • Socrates' Kantian Conception of Virtue.Daniel Devereux - 1995 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 33 (3):381-408.
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  • Socrates.Dorothea Frede - 1972 - Philosophy and History 5 (1):40-41.
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  • Socrates' Charitable Treatment of Poetry.Nickolas Pappas - 1989 - Philosophy and Literature 13 (2):248-261.
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  • The Dialogues of Plato.J. H. R., B. Jowett, D. J. Allan & H. E. Dale - 1954 - Journal of Philosophy 51 (2):64.
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  • Plato's Earlier Dialectic. [REVIEW]Richard Robinson - 1942 - Ethics 52 (4):504-506.
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  • Paradox in Plato's 'Phaedrus'.Mary Margaret Mackenzie - 1982 - Cambridge Classical Journal 28:64-75.
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  • Plato on the Rhetoric of Philosophers and Sophists.Marina McCoy - 2008 - Cambridge University Press.
    Marina McCoy explores Plato's treatment of the rhetoric of philosophers and sophists through a thematic treatment of six different Platonic dialogues, including Apology, Protagoras, Gorgias, Republic, Sophist, and Phaedras. She argues that Plato presents the philosopher and the sophist as difficult to distinguish, insofar as both use rhetoric as part of their arguments. Plato does not present philosophy as rhetoric-free, but rather shows that rhetoric is an integral part of philosophy. However, the philosopher and the sophist are distinguished by the (...)
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  • Listening to the Cicadas: A Study of Plato's Phaedrus.A. W. Price & G. R. F. Ferrari - 1990 - Philosophical Review 99 (3):447.
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  • The Unity of Virtue.Terry Penner - 1973 - Philosophical Review 82 (1):35-68.
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  • Argument, Rhetoric, and Philosophic Method: Plato's "Protagoras".Eugenio Benitez - 1992 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 25 (3):222 - 252.
    The greatest rhetorical display (έπιδείξις) of Plato's Protagoras is apparently not Protagoras's famous myth cum démonstration1 about the teachability of excellence (αρετή),2 but rather the dia logue as a whole. The Protagoras exposes key différences between the methods and presuppositions of Socrates and those of the Sophists - thus defending Socrates against the charge of being a Sophist himself - and in so doing clarifies the conditions and princi ples of ethical argumentation.3 The display of the Protagoras oc curs on (...)
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  • Listening to the Cicadas: A Study of Plato's "Phaedrus".G. R. F. Ferrari - 1988 - Phronesis 33 (2):216-224.
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  • The Dialogues of Plato. [REVIEW]B. Jowett - 1925 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 45 (4):274.
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  • Les ruses de l'intelligence : La Mètis des Grecs.Marcel Detienne & Jean-Pierre Vernant - 1975 - Tijdschrift Voor Filosofie 37 (4):716-717.
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  • Socrates on Akrasia, Knowledge, and the Power of Appearance.Thomas C. Brickhouse & Nicholas D. Smith - 2007 - In Christopher Bobonich & Pierre Destrée (eds.), Akrasia in Greek Philosophy: From Socrates to Plotinus. Brill. pp. 1--18.
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  • The Unity of Plato's Phaedrus.Malcolm Heath - 1989 - Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 7:151-73.
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  • Socrates and Protagoras on Virtue.''.Denis O'Brien - 2003 - Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 24:59-131.
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  • Protagoras.C. C. W. Taylor (ed.) - 2009 - Oxford University Press.
    In this dialogue Plato shows the pretensions of the leading sophist, Protagoras, challenged by the critical arguments of Socrates. The dialogue broadens out to consider the nature of the good life and the role of intellect and pleasure.
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  • Introduction.Burkhard Reis & Dorothea Frede - 2009 - In Burkhard Reis & Dorothea Frede (eds.), Body and Soul in Ancient Philosophy. Walter de Gruyter.
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  • Eristic, Antilogic, Sophistic, Dialectic: Plato's Demarcation of Philosophy From Sophistry.Alexander Nehamas - 1990 - History of Philosophy Quarterly 7 (1):3 - 16.
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  • « Socratic Dialogue And Platonic Dialectic. How The Soul Knows In The Republic ».Noburu Notomi - 2004 - Plato: The Internet Journal of the International Plato Society 4.
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