Switch to: Citations

References in:

The Worseness of Nonexistence

In Solberg Gamlund and (ed.), Saving lives from the badness of death. Oxford University Press. pp. 215-228 (2019)

Add references

You must login to add references.
  1. Reasons and Persons.Joseph Margolis - 1986 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 47 (2):311-327.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1638 citations  
  • The Human Animal. Personal identity without psychology.Eric T. Olson - 1997 - Revue Philosophique de la France Et de l'Etranger 192 (1):112-113.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   268 citations  
  • Weighing Lives.Daniel M. Hausman - 2005 - Mind 114 (455):718-722.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   73 citations  
  • The Benefits of Coming into Existence.Krister Bykvist - 2007 - Philosophical Studies 135 (3):335-362.
    This paper argues that we can benefit or harm people by creating them, but only in the sense that we can create things that are good or bad for them. What we cannot do is to confer comparative benefits and harms to people by creating them or failing to create them. You are not better off (or worse off) created than you would have been had you not been created, for nothing has value for you if you do not exist, (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   56 citations  
  • Reconsidering Categorical Desire Views.Travis Timmerman - 2015 - In Michael Cholbi (ed.), Immortality and the Philosophy of Death. New York: Rowman & Littlefield International.
    Deprivation views of the badness of death are almost universally accepted among those who hold that death can be bad for the person who dies. In their most common form, deprivation views hold that death is bad because (and to the extent that) it deprives people of goods they would have gained had they not died at the time they did. Contrast this with categorical desire views, which hold that death is bad because (and to the extent that) it thwarts (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  • Nonclassical Minds and Indeterminate Survival.J. Robert G. Williams - 2014 - Philosophical Review 123 (4):379-428.
    Revisionary theories of logic or truth require revisionary theories of mind. This essay outlines nonclassically based theories of rational belief, desire, and decision making, singling out the supervaluational family for special attention. To see these nonclassical theories of mind in action, this essay examines a debate between David Lewis and Derek Parfit over what matters in survival. Lewis argued that indeterminacy in personal identity allows caring about psychological connectedness and caring about personal identity to amount to the same thing. The (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   25 citations  
  • Decision-Making Under Indeterminacy.J. Robert G. Williams - 2014 - Philosophers' Imprint 14.
    Decisions are made under uncertainty when there are distinct outcomes of a given action, and one is uncertain to which the act will lead. Decisions are made under indeterminacy when there are distinct outcomes of a given action, and it is indeterminate to which the act will lead. This paper develops a theory of (synchronic and diachronic) decision-making under indeterminacy that portrays the rational response to such situations as inconstant. Rational agents have to capriciously and randomly choose how to resolve (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   74 citations  
  • Modal Logic as Metaphysics.Timothy Williamson - 2013 - Oxford, England: Oxford University Press.
    Timothy Williamson gives an original and provocative treatment of deep metaphysical questions about existence, contingency, and change, using the latest resources of quantified modal logic. Contrary to the widespread assumption that logic and metaphysics are disjoint, he argues that modal logic provides a structural core for metaphysics.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   423 citations  
  • The Limits of Kindness.Caspar John Hare - 2013 - Oxford: Oxford University Press.
    Caspar Hare presents a bold and original approach to questions of what we ought to do, and why we ought to do it. He breaks with tradition to argue that we can tackle difficult problems in normative ethics by starting with a principle that is humble and uncontroversial. Being moral involves wanting particular other people to be better off.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   21 citations  
  • Obligations to Merely Statistical People.Caspar Hare - 2012 - Journal of Philosophy 109 (5-6):378-390.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   17 citations  
  • The Ethics of Killing: Problems at the Margins of Life.Jeff McMahan - 2002 - New York, US: OUP Usa.
    A comprehensive study of the ethics of killing in cases in which the metaphysical or moral status of the individual killed is uncertain or controversial. Among those beings whose status is questionable or marginal in this way are human embryos and fetuses, newborn infants, animals, anencephalic infants, human beings with severe congenital and cognitive impairments, and human beings who have become severely demented or irreversibly comatose. In an effort to understand the moral status of these beings, this book develops and (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   410 citations  
  • We Are Not Human Beings.Derek Parfit - 2012 - Philosophy 87 (1):5-28.
    We can start with some science fiction. Here on Earth, I enter the Teletransporter. When I press some button, a machine destroys my body, while recording the exact states of all my cells. This information is sent by radio to Mars, where another machine makes, out of organic materials, a perfect copy of my body. The person who wakes up on Mars seems to remember living my life up to the moment when I pressed the button, and is in every (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   101 citations  
  • Death.Shelly Kagan - 2012 - New Haven: Yale University Press.
    There is one thing we can be sure of: we are all going to die. But once we accept that fact, the questions begin. In this thought-provoking book, philosophy professor Shelly Kagan examines the myriad questions that arise when we confront the meaning of mortality. Do we have reason to believe in the existence of immortal souls? Or should we accept an account according to which people are just material objects, nothing more? Can we make sense of the idea of (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   39 citations  
  • Rethinking the Good: Moral Ideals and the Nature of Practical Reasoning.Larry S. Temkin - 2012 - , US: Oxford University Press.
    Temkin's book is a very original and deeply unsettling work of skeptical philosophy that mounts an important new challenge to contemporary ethics.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   184 citations  
  • Well-being and death.Ben Bradley - 2009 - New York: Oxford University Press.
    Well-Being and Death addresses philosophical questions about death and the good life: what makes a life go well? Is death bad for the one who dies? How is this possible if we go out of existence when we die? Is it worse to die as an infant or as a young adult? Is it bad for animals and fetuses to die? Can the dead be harmed? Is there any way to make death less bad for us? Ben Bradley defends the (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   167 citations  
  • Weighing lives.John Broome - 2004 - New York: Oxford University Press.
    We are often faced with choices that involve the weighing of people's lives against each other, or the weighing of lives against other good things. These are choices both for individuals and for societies. A person who is terminally ill may have to choose between palliative care and more aggressive treatment, which will give her a longer life but at some cost in suffering. We have to choose between the convenience to ourselves of road and air travel, and the lives (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   231 citations  
  • Well-being.Roger Crisp - 2013 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   91 citations  
  • Utilitarianism and new generations.Jan Narveson - 1967 - Mind 76 (301):62-72.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   105 citations  
  • Death.Thomas Nagel - 1970 - Noûs 4 (1):73-80.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   255 citations  
  • The Human Animal: Personal Identity Without Psychology.Eric Todd Olson - 1997 - New York, US: Oxford University Press.
    Most philosophers writing about personal identity in recent years claim that what it takes for us to persist through time is a matter of psychology. In this groundbreaking new book, Eric Olson argues that such approaches face daunting problems, and he defends in their place a radically non-psychological account of personal identity. He defines human beings as biological organisms, and claims that no psychological relation is either sufficient or necessary for an organism to persist. Olson rejects several famous thought-experiments dealing (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   254 citations  
  • Reasons and Persons.Derek Parfit - 1984 - Oxford, GB: Oxford University Press.
    Challenging, with several powerful arguments, some of our deepest beliefs about rationality, morality, and personal identity, Parfit claims that we have a false view about our own nature. It is often rational to act against our own best interersts, he argues, and most of us have moral views that are self-defeating. We often act wrongly, although we know there will be no one with serious grounds for complaint, and when we consider future generations it is very hard to avoid conclusions (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2866 citations  
  • Conditional Reasons and the Procreation Asymmetry.Johann Frick - 2020 - Philosophical Perspectives 34 (1):53-87.
    This paper sketches a theory of the reason‐giving force of well‐being that allows us to reconcile our intuitions about two of the most recalcitrant problem cases in population ethics: Jan Narveson's Procreation Asymmetry and Derek Parfit's Non‐Identity Problem. I show that what has prevented philosophers from developing a theory that gives a satisfactory account of both these problems is their tacit commitment to a teleological conception of well‐being, as something to be ‘promoted’. Replacing this picture with one according to which (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   21 citations  
  • Well-Being.Roger Crisp - 2014 - In Edward N. Zalta (ed.), The Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy. Stanford, CA: The Metaphysics Research Lab.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   95 citations  
  • Jeff McMahan, The Ethics of Killing: Problems at the Margins of Life. [REVIEW]Frances Kamm - 2007 - Philosophical Review 116 (2):273-280.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   92 citations  
  • The Value of Existence.Wlodek Rabinowicz & Gustaf Arrhenius - 2015 - In Iwao Hirose & Jonas Olson (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Value Theory. New York NY: Oxford University Press USA. pp. 424-444.
    Can it be better or worse for a person to exist than not to exist at all? This old and challenging existential question has been raised anew in contemporary moral philosophy, mainly for two reasons. First, traditional “impersonal” ethical theories, such as utilitarianism, have counterintuitive implications in population ethics, for example, the repugnant conclusion. Second, it has seemed evident to many that an outcome can be better than another only if it is better for someone, and that only moral theories (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   34 citations  
  • Sorites paradox.Dominic Hyde - 2008 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    The sorites paradox is the name given to a class of paradoxical arguments, also known as little by little arguments, which arise as a result of the indeterminacy surrounding limits of application of the predicates involved. For example, the concept of a heap appears to lack sharp boundaries and, as a consequence of the subsequent indeterminacy surrounding the extension of the predicate ‘is a heap’, no one grain of wheat can be identified as making the difference between being a heap (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   30 citations  
  • Can it ever be better never to have existed at all? Person-based consequentialism and a new repugnant conclusion.Melinda A. Roberts - 2003 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 20 (2):159–185.
    ABSTRACT Broome and others have argued that it makes no sense, or at least that it cannot be true, to say that it is better for a given person that he or she exist than not. That argument can be understood to suggest that, likewise, it makes no sense, or at least that it cannot be true, to say that it is worse for a given person that he or she exist than that he or she never have existed at (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   36 citations  
  • Abortion and the golden rule.R. M. Hare - 1975 - Philosophy and Public Affairs 4 (3):201-222.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   63 citations  
  • The Person-Affecting Restriction, Comparativism, and the Moral Status of Potential People.Gustaf Arrhenius - 2003 - Ethical Perspectives 10 (3):185-195.
    Traditional ethical theories have paradoxical implications in regards to questions concerning procreation and our moral duties to future people. It has been suggested that the crux of the problem resides in an all too ‘impersonal’ axiology and that the problems of population axiology can be solved by adopting a ‘Person Affecting Restriction’ which in its slogan form states that an outcome can only be better than another if it is better for people. This move has been especially popular in the (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  • Existential Risk Prevention as Global Priority.Nick Bostrom - 2013 - Global Policy 4 (1):15–31.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   42 citations  
  • Epicurean challenges to the disvalue of death.Carl Tollef Solbert - 2019 - In Espen Gamlund & Carl Tollef Solberg (eds.), Saving People from the Harm of Death. New York: Oxford University Press.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • John Broome, Weighing Lives. [REVIEW]Jacob Ross - 2007 - Philosophical Review 116 (4):663-666.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   80 citations  
  • Fundamental Indeterminacy.Elizabeth Barnes - 2014 - Analytic Philosophy 55 (4):339-362.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   51 citations  
  • The Asymmetry: A Solution.Melinda A. Roberts - 2011 - Theoria 77 (4):333-367.
    The Asymmetry consists of two claims. (A) That a possible person's life would be abjectly miserable –less than worth living – counts against bringing that person into existence. But (B) that a distinct possible person's life would be worth living or even well worth living does not count in favour of bringing that person into existence. In recent years, the view that the two halves of the Asymmetry are jointly untenable has become increasingly entrenched. If we say all persons matter (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   41 citations  
  • People and their bodies.Judith Jarvis Thomson - 2008 - In Theodore Sider, John Hawthorne & Dean W. Zimmerman (eds.), Contemporary debates in metaphysics. Malden, MA: Blackwell.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   61 citations  
  • On the social and personal value of existence.Marc Fleurbaey & Alex Voorhoeve - 2015 - In . pp. 95-109.
    If a potential person would have a good life if he were to come into existence, can we coherently regard his coming into existence as better for him than his never coming into existence? And can we regard the situation in which he never comes into existence as worse for him? In this paper, we argue that both questions should be answered affirmatively. We also explain where prominent arguments to differing conclusions go wrong. Finally, we explore the relevance of our (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  • Ethical Vagueness and Practical Reasoning.Billy Dunaway - 2017 - Philosophical Quarterly 67 (266):38-60.
    This paper looks at the phenomenon of ethical vagueness by asking the question, how ought one to reason about what to do when confronted with a case of ethical vagueness? I begin by arguing that we must confront this question, since ethical vagueness is inescapable. I then outline one attractive answer to the question: we ought to maximize expected moral value when confronted with ethical vagueness. This idea yields determinate results for what one rationally ought to do in cases of (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   15 citations  
  • Book review: John Broome 'ethics out of economics'. [REVIEW]Richard Bradley - 2002 - Mind 111 (444):837-841.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   50 citations  
  • The Human Animal: Personal Identity without Psychology.Jim Stone - 1997 - Philosophical and Phenomenological Research 60 (2):495-497.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   44 citations  
  • Ethics Out of Economics.John Broome - 1999 - New York: Cambridge University Press.
    Many economic problems are also ethical problems: should we value economic equality? how much should we care about preserving the environment? how should medical resources be divided between saving life and enhancing life? This book examines some of the practical issues that lie between economics and ethics, and shows how utility theory can contribute to ethics. John Broome's work has, unusually, combined sophisticated economic and philosophical expertise, and Ethics Out of Economics brings together some of his most important essays, augmented (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   97 citations  
  • Rethinking the Person-Affecting Principle.Jacob Ross - 1998 - Journal of Moral Philosophy 12 (4):428-461.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   21 citations  
  • Rethinking the Good: A Reply to My Critics.L. S. Temkin - 2014 - Analysis 74 (3):439-488.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  • Parfit and the sorites paradox.J. M. Goodenough - 1996 - Philosophical Studies 83 (2):113-20.
    This paper aims to establish that Sorites reasoning, a fundamental part of Parfit's work, is more destructive that he intends. I establish the form that Parfit's arguments take and then substitute premises whose acceptability to Parfit I show. The new argument demonstrates an eliminativism or immaterialism concerning persons which Parfit must find repugnant.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • On the value of coming into existence.Nils Holtug - 2001 - The Journal of Ethics 5 (4):361-384.
    In this paper I argue that coming into existence can benefit (or harm) aperson. My argument incorporates the comparative claim that existence canbe better (or worse) for a person than never existing. Since these claimsare highly controversial, I consider and reject a number of objectionswhich threaten them. These objections raise various semantic, logical,metaphysical and value-theoretical issues. I then suggest that there is animportant sense in which it can harm (or benefit) a person not to comeinto existence. Again, I consider and (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   46 citations  
  • Comparing Existence and Non-Existence.Hilary Greaves & John Cusbert - 2022 - In Jeff McMahan, Timothy Campbell, Ketan Ramakrishnan & Jimmy Goodrich (eds.), Ethics and Existence: The Legacy of Derek Parfit. New York, NY: Oxford University Press.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • .Wlodek Rabinowicz - 2016
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   51 citations