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  1. Collected Papers of Charles Sanders Peirce.Charles S. Peirce - 1931 - Cambridge: Harvard University Press.
    PRINCIPLES OF PHILOSOPHY" CHAPTER 1 LESSONS FROM THE HISTORY OF PHILOSOPHY §1. NOMINALISM* 15. Very early in my studies of logic, before I had really been ...
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  • The Representing Brain: Neural Correlates of Motor Intention and Imagery.Marc Jeannerod - 1994 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 17 (2):187-202.
    This paper concerns how motor actions are neurally represented and coded. Action planning and motor preparation can be studied using a specific type of representational activity, motor imagery. A close functional equivalence between motor imagery and motor preparation is suggested by the positive effects of imagining movements on motor learning, the similarity between the neural structures involved, and the similar physiological correlates observed in both imaging and preparing. The content of motor representations can be inferred from motor images at a (...)
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  • Biological Roots of Musical Epistemology: Functional Cycles, Umwelt, and Enactive Listening.Mark Reybrouck - 2001 - Semiotica 2001 (134):599-633.
    This article argues for an epistemology of music, stating that dealing with music can be considered as a process of knowledge acquisition. What really matters is not the representation of an ontological musical reality, but the generation of music knowledge as a tool for adaptation to the sonic world. Three major positions are brought together: the epistemological claims of Jean Piaget, the biological methodology of Jakob von Uexküll, and the constructivistic conceptions of Ernst von Glasersfeld, each ingstress the role of (...)
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  • Enacting Musical Experience.Joel Krueger - 2009 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 16 (2-3):98-123.
    I argue for an enactive account of musical experience — that is, the experience of listening ‘deeply’(i.e., sensitively and understandingly) to a piece of music. The guiding question is: what do we do when we listen ‘deeply’to music? I argue that these music listening episodes are, in fact, doings. They are instances of active perceiving, robust sensorimotor engagements with and manipulations of sonic structures within musical pieces. Music is thus experiential art, and in Nietzsche’s words, ‘we listen to music with (...)
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  • The Dynamics of Perception and Action.William H. Warren - 2006 - Psychological Review 113 (2):358-389.
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  • Embodied Cognition: A Field Guide.Michael L. Anderson - 2003 - Artificial Intelligence 149 (1):91-130.
    The nature of cognition is being re-considered. Instead of emphasizing formal operations on abstract symbols, the new approach foregrounds the fact that cognition is, rather, a situated activity, and suggests that thinking beings ought therefore be considered first and foremost as acting beings. The essay reviews recent work in Embodied Cognition, provides a concise guide to its principles, attitudes and goals, and identifies the physical grounding project as its central research focus.
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  • Biosemiotics and the Foundation of Cybersemiotics: Reconceptualizing the Insights of Ethology, Second-Order Cybernetics, and Peirce’s Semiotics in Biosemiotics to Create a Non-Cartesian Information Science.Søren Brier - 1999 - Semiotica 127 (1-4):169-198.
    Any great new theoretical framework has an epistemological and an ontological aspect to its philosophy as well as an axiological one, and one needs to understand all three aspects in order to grasp the deep aspiration and idea of the theoretical framework. Presently, there is a widespread effort to understand C. S. Peirce's (1837–1914) pragmaticistic semeiotics, and to develop it by integrating the results of modern science and evolutionary thinking; first, producing a biosemiotics and, second, by integrating it with the (...)
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  • Autopoiesis and Cognition: The Realization of the Living.F. Varela & Humberto Maturana - 1973/1980 - D. Reidel Publishing Company.
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  • Action in Perception. [REVIEW]Alva Noë - 2005 - Journal of Philosophy 102 (5):259-272.
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  • Women, Fire, and Dangerous Things: What Categories Reveal About the Mind.George Lakoff - 1987 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 22 (4):299-302.
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  • The Ecological Approach to Visual Perception.James J. Gibson - 1979 - Houghton Mifflin.
    This is a book about how we see: the environment around us (its surfaces, their layout, and their colors and textures); where we are in the environment; whether or not we are moving and, if we are, where we are going; what things are good for; how to do things (to thread a needle or drive an automobile); or why things look as they do.The basic assumption is that vision depends on the eye which is connected to the brain. The (...)
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  • The Senses Considered as Perceptual Systems.James J. Gibson - 1966 - Synthese 17 (2):230-232.
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  • An Outline of a Theory of Affordances.Anthony Chemero - 2003 - Ecological Psychology 15 (2):181-195.
    The primary difference between direct and inferential theories of perception concerns the location of perceptual content, the meaning of our perceptions. In inferential theories of perception, these meanings arise inside animals, based upon their interactions with the physical environment. Light, for example, bumps into receptors causing a sensation. The animal (or its brain) performs inferences on the sensation, yielding a meaningful perception. In direct theories of perception, on the other hand, meaning is in the environment, and perception does not depend (...)
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  • The Embodied Mind: Cognitive Science and Human Experience.Francisco Varela, Evan Thompson & Eleanor Rosch - 1991 - MIT Press.
    The Embodied Mind provides a unique, sophisticated treatment of the spontaneous and reflective dimension of human experience.
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  • Action in Perception.Alva Noë - 2005 - MIT Press.
    "Perception is not something that happens to us, or in us," writes Alva Noe. "It is something we do." In Action in Perception, Noe argues that perception and perceptual consciousness depend on capacities for action and thought — that ...
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  • The Ecological Approach to Visual Perception.Marc H. Bornstein - 1980 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 39 (2):203-206.
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  • The Body in the Mind: The Bodily Basis of Meaning, Imagination, and Reason.Mark Johnson - 1989 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 47 (4):400-401.
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  • Metaphors We Live By.Max Black - 1980 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 40 (2):208-210.
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  • Signification and Significance: A Study of the Relations of Signs and Values.Max Black - 1964 - Philosophical Review 76 (1):131-132.
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  • The Province of Functional Psychology.Felix Arnold - 1907 - Journal of Philosophy, Psychology and Scientific Methods 4 (10):276-277.
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  • Semiotics and Jakob von Uexküll’s Concept of Umwelt.John Deely - 2004 - Sign Systems Studies 32 (1/2):11-33.
    Semiotics, the body of knowledge developed by study of the action of signs, like every living discipline, depends upon a community of inquirers united through the recognition and adoption of basic principles which establish the ground-concepts and guide-concepts for their ongoing research. These principles, in turn, come to be recognized in the first place through the work of pioneers in the field, workers commonly unrecognized or not fully recognized in their own day, but whose work later becomes foundational as the (...)
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  • Complexity, Hypersets, and the Ecological Perspective on Perception-Action.Anthony Chemero & M. T. Turvey - 2007 - Biological Theory 2 (1):23-36.
    The ecological approach to perception-action is unlike the standard approach in several respects. It takes the animal-in-its-environment as the proper scale for the theory and analysis of perception-action, it eschews symbol based accounts of perception-action, it promotes self-organization as the theory-constitutive metaphor for perception-action, and it employs self-referring, non-predicative definitions in explaining perception-action. The present article details the complexity issues confronted by the ecological approach in terms suggested by Rosen and introduces non-well-founded set theory as a potentially useful tool for (...)
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  • Doing Things with Music.Joel W. Krueger - 2011 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 10 (1):1-22.
    This paper is an exploration of how we do things with music—that is, the way that we use music as an esthetic technology to enact micro-practices of emotion regulation, communicative expression, identity construction, and interpersonal coordination that drive core aspects of our emotional and social existence. The main thesis is: from birth, music is directly perceived as an affordance-laden structure. Music, I argue, affords a sonic world, an exploratory space or nested acoustic environment that further affords possibilities for, among other (...)
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  • A Biosemiotic and Ecological Approach to Music Cognition: Event Perception Between Auditory Listening and Cognitive Economy.Mark Reybrouck - 2005 - Axiomathes 15 (2):229-266.
    This paper addresses the question whether we can conceive of music cognition in ecosemiotic terms. It claims that music knowledge must be generated as a tool for adaptation to the sonic world and calls forth a shift from a structural description of music as an artifact to a process-like approach to dealing with music. As listeners, we are observers who construct and organize our knowledge and bring with us our observational tools. What matters is not merely the sonic world in (...)
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  • A Biosemiotic and Ecological Approach to Music Cognition: Event Perception Between Auditory Listening and Cognitive Economy. [REVIEW]Mark Reybrouck - 2005 - Axiomathes. An International Journal in Ontology and Cognitive Systems. 15 (2):229-266.
    This paper addresses the question whether we can conceive of music cognition in ecosemiotic terms. It claims that music knowledge must be generated as a tool for adaptation to the sonic world and calls forth a shift from a structural description of music as an artifact to a process-like approach to dealing with music. As listeners, we are observers who construct and organize our knowledge and bring with us our observational tools. What matters is not merely the sonic world in (...)
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  • Metaphors We Live By.George Lakoff & Mark Johnson - 1980 - Ethics 93 (3):619-621.
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  • Neuropragmatics in the 21st Century.Brigitte Stemmer & Paul Walter Schönle - 2000 - Brain and Language 71 (1):233-236.
    One of the great challenges of the new millennium is the continuing search of how the mind works. Although a relatively young field, the study of neuropragmatics can greatly contribute to this search by its interdisciplinary nature, the possibility to be applied to different research meth-ods and by the opportunity to study its nature by taking vastly different perspectives.
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  • Introduction: Meaning and Science in Jakob von Uexküll’s Concept of Biology.Thure von Uexküll - 1982 - Semiotica 42 (1):1-24.
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  • Philosophy in the Flesh the Embodied Mind and its Challenge to Western Thought.George Lakoff - 1999 - Basic Books.
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  • Signification and Significance a Study of the Relations of Signs and Values.Charles W. Morris - 1964 - M.I.T. Press, Massachusetts Institute of Technology.
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  • Signification and Significance: A Study of the Relations of Signs and Values.Charles W. Morris - 1964 - Cambridge: M.I.T. Press, Massachusetts Institute of Technology.
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  • Movements of Thought in the Nineteenth Century.George Herbert Mead & Merritt Hadden Moore - 1936 - Chicago: University of Chicago Press.
    These are limited in scope. Thus Professor Meads lectures on the Movements of Thought in the Nineteenth Century are peculiarly apt, for a number of reasons.
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  • The Senses Considered as Perceptual Systems.James Jerome Gibson - 1966 - Boston, USA: Houghton Mifflin.
    Describes the various senses as sensory systems that are attuned to the environment. Develops the notion of rich sensory information that specifies the distal environment. Includes a discussion of affordances.
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  • Steps to an Ecology of Mind.G. Bateson - 1972 - Jason Aronson.
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  • Women, Fire and Dangerous Thing: What Catergories Reveal About the Mind.George Lakoff - 1987 - University of Chicago Press.
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  • Upper Processing Stages of the Perception–Action Cycle.Joaquı́n M. Fuster - 2004 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 8 (4):143-145.
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  • An Ecological Approach to Semiotics.W. Luke Windsor - 2004 - Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 34 (2):179-198.
    This paper proposes an ecological approach to the perception and interpretation of signs. The theory draws upon the ecological approach of James Gibson . It is proposed that cultural and natural perception can both be explained in terms of the direct pick-up of structured information and the Gibsonian concept of affordances without having to invoke a sharp distinction between direct and indirect perception. The application of the theory is exemplified through attention to language and to the visual and audio arts.
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  • The Province of Functional Psychology.James Rowland Angell - 1907 - Psychological Review 14 (2):61-91.
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  • The Senses Considered as Perceptual Systems.Charles K. West & James J. Gibson - 1969 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 3 (1):142.
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  • Ecological Foundations of Cognition. II: Degrees of Freedom and Conserved Quantities in Animal-Environment Systems.Robert E. Shaw & M. T. Turvey - 1999 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 6 (11-12):11-12.
    Cognition means different things to different psychologists depending on the position held on the mind-matter problem. Ecological psychologists reject the implied mind-matter dualism as an ill-posed theoretic problem because the assumed mind-matter incommensurability precludes a solution to the degrees of freedom problem. This fundamental problem was posed by both Nicolai Bernstein and James J. Gibson independently. It replaces mind-matter dualism with animal-environment duality -- a better posed scientific problem because commensurability is assured. Furthermore, when properly posed this way, a conservation (...)
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  • Circularity, Reliability, and the Cognitive Penetrability of Perception.Jack Lyons - 2011 - Philosophical Issues 21 (1):289-311.
    Is perception cognitively penetrable, and what are the epistemological consequences if it is? I address the latter of these two questions, partly by reference to recent work by Athanassios Raftopoulos and Susanna Seigel. Against the usual, circularity, readings of cognitive penetrability, I argue that cognitive penetration can be epistemically virtuous, when---and only when---it increases the reliability of perception.
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  • Signification and Significance.Charles Morris - 1966 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 27 (1):129-130.
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  • Movements of Thought in the Nineteenth Century.George H. Mead & Merritt H. Moore - 1936 - Philosophy 11 (44):486-487.
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  • Metaphors We Live By.George Lakoff - 1980 - University of Chicago Press.
    The now-classic Metaphors We Live By changed our understanding of metaphor and its role in language and the mind. Metaphor, the authors explain, is a fundamental mechanism of mind, one that allows us to use what we know about our physical and social experience to provide understanding of countless other subjects. Because such metaphors structure our most basic understandings of our experience, they are "metaphors we live by"--metaphors that can shape our perceptions and actions without our ever noticing them. In (...)
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  • Ecological Constraints on Internal Representation: Resonant Kinematics of Perceiving, Imagining, Thinking, and Dreaming.Roger N. Shepard - 1984 - Psychological Review 91 (4):417-447.
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  • Umwelt-Theory and Pragmatism.Alexei Sharov - 2001 - Semiotica 2001 (134).
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  • The Theory of Meaning.Jakob von Uexküll - 1982 - Semiotica 42 (1).
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  • Semiotic Ecology: Different Natures in the Semiosphere.Kalevi Kull - 1998 - Sign Systems Studies 26 (1):344-371.
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  • The Estonian Connection.Thomas A. Sebeok - 1998 - Sign Systems Studies 26:20-41.
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  • Movements of Thought in the Nineteenth Century.A. E. M., George H. Mead & Merritt H. Moore - 1936 - Journal of Philosophy 33 (14):384.
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