Switch to: Citations

Add references

You must login to add references.
  1. The promise of feminist reflexivities: Developing Donna Haraway's project for feminist science studies.Kirsten Campbell - 2004 - Hypatia 19 (1):162-182.
    : This paper explores models of reflexive feminist science studies through the work of Donna Haraway. The paper argues that Haraway provides an important account of science studies that is both feminist and constructivist. However, her concepts of "situated knowledges" and "diffraction" need further development to be adequate models of feminist science studies. To develop this constructivist and feminist project requires a collective research program that engages with feminist reflexivity as a practice.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • The Promise of Feminist Reflexivities: Developing Donna Haraway's Project for Feminist Science Studies.Kirsten Campbell - 2004 - Hypatia 19 (1):162-182.
    This paper explores models of reflexive feminist science studies through the work of Donna Haraway. The paper argues that Haraway provides an important account of science studies that is both feminist and constructivist. However, her concepts of “situated knowledges” and “diffraction” need further development to be adequate models of feminist science studies. To develop this constructivist and feminist project requires a collective research program that engages with feminist reflexivity as a practice.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • Mindware: An Introduction to the Philosophy of Cognitive Science.Andy Clark - 2001 - New York: Oxford University Press.
    Mindware: An Introduction to the Philosophy of Cognitive Science invites readers to join in up-to-the-minute conceptual discussions of the fundamental issues, problems, and opportunities in cognitive science. Written by one of the most renowned scholars in the field, this vivid and engaging introductory text relates the story of the search for a cognitive scientific understanding of mind. This search is presented as a no-holds-barred journey from early work in artificial intelligence, through connectionist (artificial neural network) counter-visions, and on to neuroscience, (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   130 citations  
  • Mindware: An Introduction to the Philosophy of Cognitive Science.Andy Clark - 2001 - New York: Oxford University Press USA.
    Ranging across both standard philosophical territory and the landscape of cutting-edge cognitive science, Mindware: An Introduction to the Philosophy of Cognitive Science, Second Edition, is a vivid and engaging introduction to key issues, research, and opportunities in the field.Starting with the vision of mindware as software and debates between realists, instrumentalists, and eliminativists, Andy Clark takes students on a no-holds-barred journey through connectionism, dynamical systems, and real-world robotics before moving on to the frontiers of cognitive technologies, enactivism, predictive coding, and (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   116 citations  
  • Phenomenology of Perception.Maurice Merleau-Ponty - 1945/1962 - New York: Routledge. Edited by Donald A. Landes.
    Challenging and rewarding in equal measure, _Phenomenology of Perception_ is Merleau-Ponty's most famous work. Impressive in both scope and imagination, it uses the example of perception to return the body to the forefront of philosophy for the first time since Plato. Drawing on case studies such as brain-damaged patients from the First World War, Merleau-Ponty brilliantly shows how the body plays a crucial role not only in perception but in speech, sexuality and our relation to others.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   890 citations  
  • Phenomenology of Perception.Maurice Merleau-Ponty - 1962 - New York: Routledge. Edited by Donald A. Landes.
    Challenging and rewarding in equal measure, _Phenomenology of Perception_ is Merleau-Ponty's most famous work. Impressive in both scope and imagination, it uses the example of perception to return the _body_ to the forefront of philosophy for the first time since Plato. Drawing on case studies such as brain-damaged patients from the First World War, Merleau-Ponty brilliantly shows how the body plays a crucial role not only in perception but in speech, sexuality and our relation to others. Perhaps above all, Merleau-Ponty's (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   943 citations  
  • Feminist Epistemology as a Local Epistemology.Helen E. Longino & Kathleen Lennon - 1997 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 71:19-54.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   17 citations  
  • I_— _Helen E. Longino.Helen E. Longino - 1997 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 71 (1):19-35.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
  • Feminist Epistemology as a Local Epistemology.Helen Longino & Kathleen Lennon - 1997 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 71:19-54.
    Feminist scholars advocate the adoption of distinctive values in research. While this constitutes a coherent alternative to the more frequently cited cognitive or scientific values, they cannot be taken to supplant those more orthodox values. Instead, each set might better be understood as a local epistemology guiding research answerable to different cognitive goals. Feminist scholars advocate the adoption of distinctive values in research. While this constitutes a coherent alternative to the more frequently cited cognitive or scientific values, they cannot be (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   22 citations  
  • Non-representationalist cognitive science and realism.Karim Zahidi - 2014 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 13 (3):461-475.
    Embodied and extended cognition is a relatively new paradigm within cognitive science that challenges the basic tenet of classical cognitive science, viz. cognition consists in building and manipulating internal representations. Some of the pioneers of embodied cognitive science have claimed that this new way of conceptualizing cognition puts pressure on epistemological and ontological realism. In this paper I will argue that such anti-realist conclusions do not follow from the basic assumptions of radical embodied cognitive science. Furthermore I will show that (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  • Wide computationalism.Robert A. Wilson - 1994 - Mind 103 (411):351-72.
    The computational argument for individualism, which moves from computationalism to individualism about the mind, is problematic, not because computationalism is false, but because computational psychology is, at least sometimes, wide. The paper provides an early, or perhaps predecessor, version of the thesis of extended cognition.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   111 citations  
  • Embodied Cognition is Not What you Think it is.Andrew D. Wilson & Sabrina Golonka - 2013 - Frontiers in Psychology 4.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   61 citations  
  • The Philosophy of Interdisciplinarity: Sustainability Science and Problem-Feeding.Henrik Thorén & Johannes Persson - 2013 - Journal for General Philosophy of Science / Zeitschrift für Allgemeine Wissenschaftstheorie 44 (2):337-355.
    Traditionally, interdisciplinarity has been taken to require conceptual or theoretical integration. However, in the emerging field of sustainability science this kind of integration is often lacking. Indeed sometimes it is regarded as an obstacle to interdisciplinarity. Drawing on examples from sustainability science, we show that problem-feeding, i.e. the transfer of problems, is a common and fruitful-looking way of connecting disparate disciplines and establishing interdisciplinarity. We identify two species of problem-feeding: unilateral and bilateral. Which of these is at issue depends on (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   19 citations  
  • Life and mind: From autopoiesis to neurophenomenology. A tribute to francisco Varela.Evan Thompson - 2004 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 3 (4):381-398.
    This talk, delivered at De l''autopoièse à la neurophénoménologie: un hommage à Francisco Varela; from autopoiesis to neurophenomenology: a tribute to Francisco Varela, June 18–20, at the Sorbonne in Paris, explicates several links between Varela''s neurophenomenology and his biological concept of autopoiesis.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   46 citations  
  • Distributed cognition: Domains and dimensions.John Sutton - 2006 - Pragmatics and Cognition 14 (2):235-247.
    Synthesizing the domains of investigation highlighted in current research in distributed cognition and related fields, this paper offers an initial taxonomy of the overlapping types of resources which typically contribute to distributed or extended cognitive systems. It then outlines a number of key dimensions on which to analyse both the resulting integrated systems and the components which coalesce into more or less tightly coupled interaction over the course of their formation and renegotiation.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   65 citations  
  • Embodied Cognition.Lawrence A. Shapiro - 2010 - New York: Routledge.
    Embodied cognition often challenges standard cognitive science. In this outstanding introduction, Lawrence Shapiro sets out the central themes and debates surrounding embodied cognition, explaining and assessing the work of many of the key figures in the field, including George Lakoff, Alva Noë, Andy Clark, and Arthur Glenberg. Beginning with an outline of the theoretical and methodological commitments of standard cognitive science, Shapiro then examines philosophical and empirical arguments surrounding the traditional perspective. He introduces topics such as dynamic systems theory, ecological (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   217 citations  
  • Embodied Cognition.Lawrence A. Shapiro - 2010 - New York: Routledge.
    Embodied cognition is a recent development in psychology that practitioners often present as a superseding standard cognitive science. In this outstanding introduction, Lawrence Shapiro sets out the central themes and debates surrounding embodied cognition, explaining and assessing the work of many of the key figures in the field, including Lawrence Barsalou, Daniel Casasanto, Andy Clark, Alva Noë, and Michael Spivey. Beginning with an outline of the theoretical and methodological commitments of standard cognitive science, Shapiro then examines philosophical and empirical arguments (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   99 citations  
  • From Something Old to Something New: Functionalist Lessons for the Cognitive Science of Scientific Creativity.Guilherme Sanches de Oliveira - 2022 - Frontiers in Psychology 12.
    An intuitive view is that creativity involves bringing together what is already known and familiar in a way that produces something new. In cognitive science, this intuition is typically formalized in terms of computational processes that combine or associate internally represented information. From this computationalist perspective, it is hard to imagine how non-representational approaches in embodied cognitive science could shed light on creativity, especially when it comes to abstract conceptual reasoning of the kind scientists so often engage in. The present (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Pragmatism, Relativism, and Irrationalism.Richard Rorty - 1980 - Proceedings and Addresses of the American Philosophical Association 53 (6):717 - 738.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   53 citations  
  • Ecological-enactive scientific cognition: modeling and material engagement.Giovanni Rolla & Felipe Novaes - 2020 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 1:1-19.
    Ecological-enactive approaches to cognition aim to explain cognition in terms of the dynamic coupling between agent and environment. Accordingly, cognition of one’s immediate environment (which is sometimes labeled “basic” cognition) depends on enaction and the picking up of affordances. However, ecological-enactive views supposedly fail to account for what is sometimes called “higher” cognition, i.e., cognition about potentially absent targets, which therefore can only be explained by postulating representational content. This challenge levelled against ecological-enactive approaches highlights a putative explanatory gap between (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • Ecological-enactive scientific cognition: modeling and material engagement.Giovanni Rolla & Felipe Novaes - 2022 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 21 (3):625-643.
    Ecological-enactive approaches to cognition aim to explain cognition in terms of the dynamic coupling between agent and environment. Accordingly, cognition of one’s immediate environment depends on enaction and the picking up of affordances. However, ecological-enactive views supposedly fail to account for what is sometimes called “higher” cognition, i.e., cognition about potentially absent targets, which therefore can only be explained by postulating representational content. This challenge levelled against ecological-enactive approaches highlights a putative explanatory gap between basic and higher cognition. In this (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  • Cultural Artifacts Transform Embodied Practice: How a Sommelier Card Shapes the Behavior of Dyads Engaged in Wine Tasting.Joanna Rączaszek-Leonardi, Julia Krzesicka, Natalia Klamann, Karolina Ziembowicz, Michał Denkiewicz, Małgorzata Kukiełka & Julian Zubek - 2019 - Frontiers in Psychology 10.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • The Body Social: An Enactive Approach to the Self.Kyselo Miriam - 2014 - Frontiers in Psychology 5:1-16.
    This paper takes a new look at an old question: what is the human self? It offers a proposal for theorizing the self from an enactive perspective as an autonomous system that is constituted through interpersonal relations. It addresses a prevalent issue in the philosophy of cognitive science: the body-social problem. Embodied and social approaches to cognitive identity are in mutual tension. On the one hand, embodied cognitive science risks a new form of methodological individualism, implying a dichotomy not between (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   14 citations  
  • What makes interdisciplinarity difficult? Some consequences of domain specificity in interdisciplinary practice.Miles MacLeod - 2018 - Synthese 195 (2):697-720.
    Research on interdisciplinary science has for the most part concentrated on the institutional obstacles that discourage or hamper interdisciplinary work, with the expectation that interdisciplinary interaction can be improved through institutional reform strategies such as through reform of peer review systems. However institutional obstacles are not the only ones that confront interdisciplinary work. The design of policy strategies would benefit from more detailed investigation into the particular cognitive constraints, including the methodological and conceptual barriers, which also confront attempts to work (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   34 citations  
  • Feminist epistemology as a local epistemology: Helen E. Longino.Helen E. Longino - 1997 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 71 (1):19–36.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   18 citations  
  • The Structure of Scientific Revolutions.Thomas S. Kuhn - 1962 - Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press. Edited by Ian Hacking.
    Thomas S. Kuhn's classic book is now available with a new index.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4747 citations  
  • Extra-academic transdisciplinarity and scientific pluralism: what might they learn from one another?Inkeri Koskinen & Uskali Mäki - 2016 - European Journal for Philosophy of Science 6 (3):419-444.
    The paper looks at challenges related to the ideas of integration and knowledge systems in extra-academic transdisciplinarity. Philosophers of science are only starting to pay attention to the increasingly common practice of introducing extra-academic perspectives or engaging extra-academic parties in academic knowledge production. So far the rather scant philosophical discussion on the subject has mainly concentrated on the question whether such engagement is beneficial in science or not. Meanwhile, there is quite a large and growing literature on extra-academic TD, mostly (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   16 citations  
  • Today the earwig, tomorrow man?David Kirsh - 1991 - Artificial Intelligence 47 (1-3):161-184.
    A startling amount of intelligent activity can be controlled without reasoning or thought. By tuning the perceptual system to task relevant properties a creature can cope with relatively sophisticated environments without concepts. There is a limit, however, to how far a creature without concepts can go. Rod Brooks, like many ecologically oriented scientists, argues that the vast majority of intelligent behaviour is concept-free. To evaluate this position I consider what special benefits accrue to concept-using creatures. Concepts are either necessary for (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   82 citations  
  • The Public Understanding of What? Laypersons' Epistemic Needs, the Division of Cognitive Labor, and the Demarcation of Science.Arnon Keren - 2018 - Philosophy of Science 85 (5):781-792.
    What must laypersons understand about science to allow them to make sound decisions on science-related issues? Relying on recent developments in social epistemology, this paper argues that scientific education should have the goal not of bringing laypersons' understanding of science closer to that of expert insiders, but rather of cultivating the kind of competence characteristic of “competent outsiders” (Feinstein 2011). Moreover, it argues that philosophers of science have an important role to play in attempts to promote this kind of understanding, (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   14 citations  
  • Essays in Radical Empiricism.William James - 1943 - Philosophical Review 52:623.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   86 citations  
  • Book Review: Handbook of Cognitive Science: An Embodied Approach. [REVIEW]David Teira - 2013 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 43 (2):268-272.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   61 citations  
  • Pragmatism, enactivism, and ecological psychology: towards a unified approach to post-cognitivism.Manuel Heras-Escribano - 2019 - Synthese 198 (Suppl 1):337-363.
    This paper argues that it is possible to combine enactivism and ecological psychology in a single post-cognitivist research framework if we highlight the common pragmatist assumptions of both approaches. These pragmatist assumptions or starting points are shared by ecological psychology and the enactive approach independently of being historically related to pragmatism, and they are based on the idea of organic coordination, which states that the evolution and development of the cognitive abilities of an organism are explained by appealing to the (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   29 citations  
  • Situated Knowledges: The Science Question in Feminism and the Privilege of Partial Perspective.Donna Haraway - 1988 - Feminist Studies 14 (3):575-599.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   756 citations  
  • Phenomenology of Perception.Aron Gurwitsch, M. Merleau-Ponty & Colin Smith - 1964 - Philosophical Review 73 (3):417.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1222 citations  
  • Is social cognition embodied?Alvin Goldman & Frederique de Vignemont - 2009 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 13 (4):154-159.
    Theories of embodied cognition abound in the literature, but it is often unclear how to understand them. We offer several interpretations of embodiment, the most interesting being the thesis that mental representations in bodily formats (B-formats) have an important role in cognition. Potential B-formats include motoric, somatosensory, affective and interoceptive formats. The literature on mirroring and related phenomena provides support for a limited-scope version of embodied social cognition under the B-format interpretation. It is questionable, however, whether such a thesis can (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   71 citations  
  • The Ecological Approach to Visual Perception: Classic Edition.James J. Gibson - 1979 - Houghton Mifflin.
    This is a book about how we see: the environment around us (its surfaces, their layout, and their colors and textures); where we are in the environment; whether or not we are moving and, if we are, where we are going; what things are good for; how to do things (to thread a needle or drive an automobile); or why things look as they do.The basic assumption is that vision depends on the eye which is connected to the brain. The (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2520 citations  
  • Mind After Uexküll: A Foray Into the Worlds of Ecological Psychologists and Enactivists.Tim Elmo Feiten - 2020 - Frontiers in Psychology 11.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   15 citations  
  • Divergence of values and goals in participatory research.Lucas Dunlap, Amanda Corris, Melissa Jacquart, Zvi Biener & Angela Potochnik - 2021 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 88 (C):284-291.
    Public participation in scientific research has gained prominence in many scientific fields, but the theory of participatory research is still limited. In this paper, we suggest that the divergence of values and goals between academic researchers and public participants in research is key to analyzing the different forms this research takes. We examine two existing characterizations of participatory research: one in terms of public participants' role in the research, the other in terms of the virtues of the research. In our (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • Transactions as known and named.John Dewey & Arthur F. Bentley - 1946 - Journal of Philosophy 43 (20):533-551.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • Philosophy and civilization.John Dewey - 1931 - Gloucester, Mass.,: P. Smith.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   33 citations  
  • Interaction and transaction.John Dewey & Arthur F. Bentley - 1946 - Journal of Philosophy 43 (19):505-517.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  • Common sense and science: Their respective frames of reference.John Dewey - 1948 - Journal of Philosophy 45 (8):197-208.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  • Against Smallism And Localism.Guilherme Sanches de Oliveira & Anthony Chemero - 2015 - Studies in Logic, Grammar and Rhetoric 41 (1):9-23.
    The question whether cognition ever extends beyond the head is widely considered to be an empirical issue. And yet, all the evidence amassed in recent years has not sufficed to settle the debate. In this paper we suggest that this is because the debate is not really an empirical one, but rather a matter of definition. Traditional cognitive science can be identified as wedded to the ideals of “smallism” and “localism”. We criticize these ideals and articulate a case in favor (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Mind Ecologies: Body, Brain, and World.Matthew Crippen & Jay Schulkin - 2020 - New York, NY, USA: Columbia University Press. Edited by Jay Schulkin.
    Mind Ecologies: Body, Brain, and World: Book Abstract from Columbian University Press -/- Matthew Crippen and Jay Schulkin -/- Pragmatism, a pluralistic philosophy with kinships to phenomenology, Gestalt psychology and embodied cognitive science, is resurging across disciplines. It has growing relevance to literary studies, the arts, and religious scholarship, along with branches of political theory, not to mention our understanding of science. But philosophies and sciences of mind have lagged behind this pragmatic turn, for the most part retaining a central-nervous-system (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   19 citations  
  • The extended mind.Andy Clark & David J. Chalmers - 1998 - Analysis 58 (1):7-19.
    Where does the mind stop and the rest of the world begin? The question invites two standard replies. Some accept the demarcations of skin and skull, and say that what is outside the body is outside the mind. Others are impressed by arguments suggesting that the meaning of our words "just ain't in the head", and hold that this externalism about meaning carries over into an externalism about mind. We propose to pursue a third position. We advocate a very different (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1636 citations  
  • Natural-Born Cyborgs: Minds, Technologies, and the Future of Human Intelligence.Andy Clark - 2003 - Oxford University Press. Edited by Alberto Peruzzi.
    In Natural-Born Cyborgs, Clark argues that what makes humans so different from other species is our capacity to fully incorporate tools and supporting cultural ...
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   324 citations  
  • Essays in Radical Empiricism.B. H. Bode, William James & R. B. Perry - 1912 - Philosophical Review 21 (6):704.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   130 citations  
  • II.2 The Strengths of the Strong Programme.David Bloor - 1981 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 11 (2):199-213.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   53 citations  
  • Ideals and monisms: recent criticisms of the Strong Programme in the sociology of knowledge.David Bloor - 2007 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 38 (1):210-234.
    I offer a reply to criticisms of the Strong Programme presented by Stephen Kemp who develops some new lines of argument that focus on the ‘monism’ of the programme. He says the programme should be rejected for three reasons. First, because it embodies ‘weak idealism’, that is, its supporters effectively sever the link between language and the world. Second, it challenges the reasons that scientists offer in explanation of their own beliefs. Third, it destroys the distinction between successful and unsuccessful (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  • Situating feminist epistemology.Natalie Alana Ashton & Robin McKenna - 2020 - Episteme 17 (1):28-47.
    Feminist epistemologies hold that differences in the social locations of inquirers make for epistemic differences, for instance, in the sorts of things that inquirers are justified in believing. In this paper we situate this core idea in feminist epistemologies with respect to debates about social constructivism. We address three questions. First, are feminist epistemologies committed to a form of social constructivism about knowledge? Second, to what extent are they incompatible with traditional epistemological thinking? Third, do the answers to these questions (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations