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  1. Noneism or Allism?David K. Lewis - 1990 - Mind 99 (393):23-31.
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  • Meinong and the Principle of Independence.Karel Lambert - 1985 - Philosophical Review 94 (3):423-426.
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  • The Logic of Inconsistency.Nicholas Rescher & Robert Brandom - 1981 - Philosophical Quarterly 31 (124):275-277.
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  • Meinong and the Principle of Independence: Its Place in Meinong's Theory of Objects and its Significance in Contemporary Philosophical Logic.Karel Lambert - 1983 - Cambridge University Press.
    As well as aiming to revive interest in Meinong's thought, this book challenges many of the most widespread assumptions of philosophical logic.
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  • The Logic of Inconsistency.N. Rescher & R. Brandom - 1980 - Blackwell.
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  • Fiction and Fictionalism.R. M. Sainsbury - 2009 - Routledge.
    Are fictional characters such as Sherlock Holmes real? What can fiction tell us about the nature of truth and reality? In this excellent introduction to the problem of fictionalism R. M. Sainsbury covers the following key topics: what is fiction? realism about fictional objects, including the arguments that fictional objects are real but non-existent; real but non-factual; real but non-concrete the relationship between fictional characters and non-actual worlds fictional entities as abstract artefacts fiction and intentionality and the problem of irrealism (...)
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  • Who is Afraid of Imaginary Objects?Gabriele Contessa - 2009 - In Nicholas Griffin & Dale Jacquette (eds.), Russell Vs. Meinong: The Legacy of "On Denoting". Routledge.
    People often use expressions such as ‘Sherlock Holmes’ and ‘Pegasus’ that appear to refer to imaginary objects. In this paper, I consider the main attempts to account for apparent reference to imaginary objects available in the literature and argue that all fall short of being fully satisfactory. In particular, I consider the problems of two main options to maintain that imaginary objects are real and reference to them is genuine reference: possibilist and abstractist account. According to the former, imaginary objects (...)
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  • Ontology, Identity and Modality.Peter van Inwagen - 2004 - Philosophy 79 (308):335-342.
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  • .Peter van Inwagen - 1988
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