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  1. Substantivalism, Relationism, and Structural Spacetime Realism.Mauro Dorato - 2000 - Foundations of Physics 30 (10):1605-1628.
    Debates about the ontological implications of the general theory of relativity have long oscillated between spacetime substantivalism and relationism. I evaluate such debates by claiming that we need a third option, which I refer to as “structural spacetime realism.” Such a tertium quid sides with the relationists in defending the relational nature of the spacetime structure, but joins the substantivalists in arguing that spacetime exists, at least in part, independently of particular physical objects and events, the degree of “independence” being (...)
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  • On Dynamics, Indiscernibility, and Spacetime Ontology.Robert Disalle - 1994 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 45 (1):265-287.
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  • Saving Newton's Text: Documents, Readers, and the Ways of the World.Robert Palter - 1986 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 18 (4):385.
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  • The Foundations of Newton's Philosophy of Nature.Richard S. Westfall - 1962 - British Journal for the History of Science 1 (2):171-182.
    Taking Isaac Newton at his own word, historians have long agreed that the decade of the 1660s, when Newton was a young man in his twenties, was the critical period in his scientific career. In the years 1665 and 1666, he has told us, he hit on the ideas of cosmic gravitation, the composition of white light, and the fluxional calculus. The elaboration of these basic ideas constituted his scientific achievement. Nevertheless, the decade of the 1660s has remained a virtual (...)
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  • Newton on Place, Time, and God: An Unpublished Source.J. E. McGuire - 1978 - British Journal for the History of Science 11 (2):114-129.
    Manuscript Add. 3965, section 13, folios 541r–542r and 545r–546r is in the Portsmouth Collection of manuscripts and housed in the University Library, Cambridge. These drafts contain a careful account, in Newton's hand, of his views on place, time, and God. They are part of a large number of drafts relating to the three official editions of the Principia published in Newton's lifetime.
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  • Space and Time in Particle and Field Physics.Dennis Dieks - 2001 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B: Studies in History and Philosophy of Modern Physics 32 (2):217-241.
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  • Space and Time in Particle and Field Physics.Dennis Dieks - 2001 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B: Studies in History and Philosophy of Modern Physics 32 (2):217-241.
    Textbooks present classical particle and field physics as theories of physical systems situated in Newtonian absolute space. This absolute space has an influence on the evolution of physical processes, and can therefore be seen as a physical system itself; it is substantival. It turns out to be possible, however, to interpret the classical theories in another way. According to this rival interpretation, spatiotemporal position is a property of physical systems, and there is no substantival spacetime. The traditional objection that such (...)
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  • By Their Properties, Causes and Effects: Newton's Scholium on Time, Space, Place and Motion—I. The Text.Robert Rynasiewicz - 1995 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 26 (1):133-153.
    As I have read the scholium, it divides into three main parts, not including the introductory paragraph. The first consists of paragraphs one to four in which Newton sets out his characterizations of absolute and relative time, space, place, and motion. Although some justificatory material is included here, notably in paragraph three, the second part is reserved for the business of justifying the characterizations he has presented. The main object is to adduce grounds for believing that the absolute quantities are (...)
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  • Henry More's Space and the Spirit of Nature.Michael Boylan - 1980 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 18 (4):395-405.
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  • Newton's Training in the Aristotelian Textbook Tradition: From Effects to Causes and Back.Steffen Ducheyne - 2005 - History of Science 43 (3):217-237.
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  • On the Space-Time Ontology of Physical Theories.Kenneth L. Manders - 1982 - Philosophy of Science 49 (4):575-590.
    In the correspondence with Clarke, Leibniz proposes to construe physical theory in terms of physical (spatio-temporal) relations between physical objects, thus avoiding incorporation of infinite totalities of abstract entities (such as Newtonian space) in physical ontology. It has generally been felt that this proposal cannot be carried out. I demonstrate an equivalence between formulations postulating space-time as an infinite totality and formulations allowing only possible spatio-temporal relations of physical (point-) objects. The resulting rigorous formulations of physical theory may be seen (...)
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  • Jewish Theologies of Space in the Scientific Revolution: Henry More, Joseph Raphson, Isaac Newton and Their Predecessors.Brian P. Copenhaver - 1980 - Annals of Science 37 (5):489-548.
    (1980). Jewish theologies of space in the scientific revolution: Henry More, Joseph Raphson, Isaac Newton and their predecessors. Annals of Science: Vol. 37, No. 5, pp. 489-548.
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  • Existence, Actuality and Necessity: Newton on Space and Time.J. E. McGuire - 1978 - Annals of Science 35 (5):463-508.
    This study considers Newton's views on space and time with respect to some important ontologies of substance in his period. Specifically, it deals in a philosophico-historical manner with his conception of substance, attribute, existence, to actuality and necessity. I show how Newton links these “features” of things to his conception of God's existence with respect of infinite space and time. Moreover, I argue that his ontology of space and time cannot be understood without fully appreciating how it relates to the (...)
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  • Newtonian Space-Time.Howard Stein - 1967 - Texas Quarterly 10:174--200.
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