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  1. Downcast Eyes: The Denigration of Vision in Twentieth-Century French Thought.Joyce Brodsky - 1996 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 54 (2):185-188.
    Long considered "the noblest of the senses," vision has increasingly come under critical scrutiny by a wide range of thinkers who question its dominance in Western culture. These critics of vision, especially prominent in twentieth-century France, have challenged its allegedly superior capacity to provide access to the world. They have also criticized its supposed complicity with political and social oppression through the promulgation of spectacle and surveillance. Martin Jay turns to this discourse surrounding vision and explores its often contradictory implications (...)
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  • A Cognitive Theory of Pretense.Stephen P. Stich & Shaun Nichols - 2000 - Cognition 74 (2):115-147.
    Recent accounts of pretense have been underdescribed in a number of ways. In this paper, we present a much more explicit cognitive account of pretense. We begin by describing a number of real examples of pretense in children and adults. These examples bring out several features of pretense that any adequate theory of pretense must accommodate, and we use these features to develop our theory of pretense. On our theory, pretense representations are contained in a separate mental workspace, a Possible (...)
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  • Twelve Conceptions of Imagination.Leslie F. Stevenson - 2003 - British Journal of Aesthetics 43 (3):238-59.
    The ability to think of something not presently perceived, but spatio-temporally real. (2) The ability to think of whatever one acknowledges as possible in the spatio-temporal world. (3) The liability to think of something that the subject believes to be real, but which is not. (4) The ability to think of things that one conceives of as fictional. (5) The ability to entertain mental images. (6) The ability to think of anything at all. (7) The non-rational operations of the mind, (...)
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  • Experience and Imagery.Natika Newton - 1983 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 21 (4):475-87.
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  • The Mysterious Flame: Conscious Minds in a Material World.Colin McGinn - 1999 - Basic Books.
    One of our most original thinkers addresses the scientific world's premier question: What is the nature of consciousness?
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  • Belief and Desire in Imagination and Immersion.Susanna Schellenberg - 2013 - Journal of Philosophy 110 (9):497-517.
    I argue that any account of imagination should satisfy the following three desiderata. First, imaginations induce actions only in conjunction with beliefs about the environment of the imagining subject. Second, there is a continuum between imaginations and beliefs. Recognizing this continuum is crucial to explain the phenomenon of imaginative immersion. Third, the mental states that relate to imaginations in the way that desires relate to beliefs are a special kind of desire, namely desires to make true in fiction. These desires (...)
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  • Imagery and the Coherence of Imagination: A Critique of White.Nigel J. T. Thomas - 1997 - Journal of Philosophical Research 22:95-127.
    Traditionally ‘imagination’ primarily denotes the faculty of mental imagery, other usages being derivative. However, contemporary philosophers commonly hold it to be a polysemous term, with several unrelated senses. This effectively eliminates this culturally important concept as an appropriate explanandum for science, and paves the way for a thoroughgoing eliminative materialism. White challenges both these views of imagination, arguing that ‘imagine’ never means ‘suppose,’ ‘believe,’ ‘pretend’ or ‘visualize,’ that imagery may occur without imagination, and that the true sense of ‘imagine’ is (...)
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  • Why We Should Give Up on the Imagination.Derek Matravers - 2010 - Midwest Studies in Philosophy 34 (1):190-199.
    This paper criticises the current orthodoxy that people who engage with fiction fils are exercising their imagination.
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  • Why Visual Attention and Awareness Are Different.Victor A. F. Lamme - 2003 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 7 (1):12-18.
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  • Mental Imagery: In Search of a Theory.Zenon W. Pylyshyn - 2002 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (2):157-182.
    It is generally accepted that there is something special about reasoning by using mental images. The question of how it is special, however, has never been satisfactorily spelled out, despite more than thirty years of research in the post-behaviorist tradition. This article considers some of the general motivation for the assumption that entertaining mental images involves inspecting a picture-like object. It sets out a distinction between phenomena attributable to the nature of mind to what is called the cognitive architecture, and (...)
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  • How the Mind Works.Steven Pinker - 1997 - Norton.
    A provocative assessment of human thought and behavior, reissued with a new afterword, explores a range of conundrums from the ability of the mind to perceive three dimensions to the nature of consciousness, in an account that draws on ...
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  • Imagination.Nigel J. T. Thomas - 1999 - Dictionary of Philosophy of Mind.
    A brief historical and conceptual account of the concept of imagination.
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  • Mental Imagery.Nigel J. T. Thomas - 2001 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Mental imagery (varieties of which are sometimes colloquially refered to as “visualizing,” “seeing in the mind's eye,” “hearing in the head,” “imagining the feel of,” etc.) is quasi-perceptual experience; it resembles perceptual experience, but occurs in the absence of the appropriate external stimuli. It is also generally understood to bear intentionality (i.e., mental images are always images of something or other), and thereby to function as a form of mental representation. Traditionally, visual mental imagery, the most discussed variety, was thought (...)
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  • A Sensorimotor Account of Vision and Visual Consciousness.J. Kevin O’Regan & Alva Noë - 2001 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (5):883-917.
    Many current neurophysiological, psychophysical, and psychological approaches to vision rest on the idea that when we see, the brain produces an internal representation of the world. The activation of this internal representation is assumed to give rise to the experience of seeing. The problem with this kind of approach is that it leaves unexplained how the existence of such a detailed internal representation might produce visual consciousness. An alternative proposal is made here. We propose that seeing is a way of (...)
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  • Color Realism and Color Science.Alex Byrne & David R. Hilbert - 2003 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (1):3-21.
    The target article is an attempt to make some progress on the problem of color realism. Are objects colored? And what is the nature of the color properties? We defend the view that physical objects (for instance, tomatoes, radishes, and rubies) are colored, and that colors are physical properties, specifically types of reflectance. This is probably a minority opinion, at least among color scientists. Textbooks frequently claim that physical objects are not colored, and that the colors are "subjective" or "in (...)
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  • The Immersive Spatiotemporal Hallucination Model of Dreaming.Jennifer M. Windt - 2010 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 9 (2):295-316.
    The paper proposes a minimal definition of dreaming in terms of immersive spatiotemporal hallucination (ISTH) occurring in sleep or during sleep–wake transitions and under the assumption of reportability. I take these conditions to be both necessary and sufficient for dreaming to arise. While empirical research results may, in the future, allow for an extension of the concept of dreaming beyond sleep and possibly even independently of reportability, ISTH is part of any possible extension of this definition and thus is a (...)
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  • Eye Movements in Natural Behavior.Mary Hayhoe & Dana Ballard - 2005 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 9 (4):188-194.
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  • The Ecological Approach to Visual Perception.James J. Gibson - 1979 - Houghton Mifflin.
    This is a book about how we see: the environment around us (its surfaces, their layout, and their colors and textures); where we are in the environment; whether or not we are moving and, if we are, where we are going; what things are good for; how to do things (to thread a needle or drive an automobile); or why things look as they do.The basic assumption is that vision depends on the eye which is connected to the brain. The (...)
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  • Furnishing the Mind: Concepts and Their Perceptual Basis.Jesse J. Prinz - 2002 - MIT Press.
    In Furnishing the Mind, Jesse Prinz attempts to swing the pendulum back toward empiricism.
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  • Imagination: A Study in the History of Ideas.Mary Warnock - 1993 - Philosophical Quarterly 43 (171):248-250.
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  • Putting the Image Back in Imagination.Amy Kind - 2001 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 62 (1):85-110.
    Despite their intuitive appeal and a long philosophical history, imagery-based accounts of the imagination have fallen into disfavor in contemporary discussions. The philosophical pressure to reject such accounts seems to derive from two distinct sources. First, the fact that mental images have proved difficult to accommodate within a scientific conception of mind has led to numerous attempts to explain away their existence, and this in turn has led to attempts to explain the phenomenon of imagining without reference to such ontologically (...)
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  • Downcast Eyes: The Denigration of Vision in Twentieth-Century French Thought.Martin Jay - 1993 - University of California Press.
    Long considered "the noblest of the senses," vision has increasingly come under critical scrutiny by a wide range of thinkers who question its dominance in Western culture. These critics of vision, especially prominent in twentieth-century France, have challenged its allegedly superior capacity to provide access to the world. They have also criticized its supposed complicity with political and social oppression through the promulgation of spectacle and surveillance. Martin Jay turns to this discourse surrounding vision and explores its often contradictory implications (...)
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  • Pictures and Spoken Descriptions Elicit Similar Eye Movements During Mental Imagery, Both in Light and in Complete Darkness.Roger Johansson, Jana Holsanova & Kenneth Holmqvist - 2006 - Cognitive Science 30 (6):1053-1079.
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  • Dreaming and Imagination.Jonathan Ichikawa - 2009 - Mind and Language 24 (1):103-121.
    What is it like to dream? On an orthodox view, dreams involve misleading sensations and false beliefs. I argue, on philosophical, psychological, and neurophysiological grounds, that orthodoxy about dreaming should be rejected in favor of an imagination model of dreaming. I am thus in partial agreement with Colin McGinn, who has argued that we do not have misleading sensory experiences while dreaming, and partially in agreement with Ernest Sosa, who has argued that we do not form false beliefs while dreaming. (...)
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  • Orienting of Attention.M. I. Posner - 1980 - Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology 32 (1):3-25.
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  • The Attentional Cost of Inattentional Blindness.Paola Bressan & Silvia Pizzighello - 2008 - Cognition 106 (1):370-383.
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  • An Inquiry Into the Human Mind, on the Principles of Common Sense.Thomas Reid - 1997 - Cambridge University Press.
    Thomas Reid, the Scottish natural and moral philosopher, was one of the founding members of the Aberdeen Philosophical Society and a significant figure in the Scottish Enlightenment. Reid believed that common sense should form the foundation of all philosophical inquiry. He criticised the sceptical philosophy propagated by his fellow Scot David Hume and the Anglo-Irish bishop George Berkeley, who asserted that the external world did not exist outside the human mind. Reid was also critical of the theory of ideas propagated (...)
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  • On Propositions: What They Are and How They Mean.Bertrand Russell - 1919 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 2 (1):1-43.
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  • Experience and Theory as Determinants of Attitudes Toward Mental Representation: The Case of Knight Dunlap and the Vanishing Images of J.B. Watson.Nigel J. T. Thomas - 1989 - American Journal of Psychology 102:395-412.
    Galton and subsequent investigators find wide divergences in people's subjective reports of mental imagery. Such individual differences might be taken to explain the peculiarly irreconcilable disputes over the nature and cognitive significance of imagery which have periodically broken out among psychologists and philosophers. However, to so explain these disputes is itself to take a substantive and questionable position on the cognitive role of imagery. This article distinguishes three separable issues over which people can be "for" or "against" mental images. Conflation (...)
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  • Intrusive Images in Psychological Disorders: Characteristics, Neural Mechanisms, and Treatment Implications.Chris R. Brewin, James D. Gregory, Michelle Lipton & Neil Burgess - 2010 - Psychological Review 117 (1):210-232.
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  • How Images Creates Us: Imagination and the Unity of Self-Consciousness.Paul Crowther - 2013 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 20 (11-12):101-123.
    This paper offers a phenomenology of the structure and scope of imagination's cognitive significance. It does so through discussing the unifying role of imagination in self-consciousness, and then the way in which this role is continued through the making of pictures in physical media such as drawing and painting. The study begins with discussion of four key features in terms of which imagination is often characterized. Particular emphasis is assigned to the quasi-sensory aspect. Part one then explains imagination as a (...)
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  • An Inquiry Into the Human Mind on the Principles of Common Sense.Thomas Reid - 1997 - In Elizabeth Schmidt Radcliffe, Richard McCarty, Fritz Allhoff & Anand Vaidya (eds.), Late Modern Philosophy: Essential Readings with Commentary. Blackwell.
    Thomas Reid , the Scottish natural and moral philosopher, was one of the founding members of the Aberdeen Philosophical Society and a significant figure in the Scottish Enlightenment. Reid believed that common sense should form the foundation of all philosophical inquiry. He criticised the sceptical philosophy propagated by his fellow Scot David Hume and the Anglo-Irish bishop George Berkeley, who asserted that the external world did not exist outside the human mind. Reid was also critical of the theory of ideas (...)
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  • Perception & Reality: A History From Descartes to Kant.John W. Yolton - 1996 - Cornell University Press.
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  • Imagination and Perception.P. F. Strawson - 1982 - In Ralph Charles Sutherland Walker (ed.), Kant on Pure Reason. Oxford University Press.
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  • Democritus on Visual Perception: Two Theories or One?Richard W. Baldes - 1975 - Phronesis 20 (2):93-105.
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  • A Theory of Visual Stability Across Saccadic Eye Movements.Bruce Bridgeman, A. H. C. Van der Heijden & Boris M. Velichkovsky - 1994 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 17 (2):247-258.
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  • Can We Change Our Vantage Point to Explore Imaginal Neglect?Paolo Bartolomeo & Sylvie Chokron - 2002 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (2):184-185.
    Right brain-damaged patients with unilateral neglect, who ignore left-sided visual events, may also omit left-sided details when describing known places from memory. Modulating the orienting of visual attention may ameliorate imaginal neglect. A first step toward explaining these phenomena might be to postulate that space-related imagery is a cognitive activity involving attentional and intentional aspects.
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  • Visual Routines.Shimon Ullman - 1984 - Cognition 18 (1-3):97-159.
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  • Eye Scanpaths During Visual Imagery Reenact Those of Perception of the Same Visual Scene.Bruno Laeng & Dinu-Stefan Teodorescu - 2002 - Cognitive Science 26 (2):207-231.
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  • How Visual Imagery Interferes with Vision.Catherine Craver-Lemley & Adam Reeves - 1992 - Psychological Review 99 (4):633-649.
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  • Mapping the Visual Field in Mental Imagery.Ronald A. Finke & Howard S. Kurtzman - 1981 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 110 (4):501-517.
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  • Some Demonstrations of the Effects of Structural Descriptions in Mental Imagery.Geoffrey Hinton - 1979 - Cognitive Science 3 (3):231-250.
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  • Elemental Operations in Vision.P. Roelfsema - 2005 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 9 (5):226-233.
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  • The Sensory Component of Imagination: The Motor Theory of Imagination as a Present-Day Solution to Sartre's Critique.Helena De Preester - 2012 - Philosophical Psychology 25 (4):1-18.
    Several recent accounts claim that imagination is a matter of simulating perceptual acts. Although this point of view receives support from both phenomenological and empirical research, I claim that Jean-Paul Sartre's worry formulated in L'imagination (1936) still holds. For a number of reasons, Sartre heavily criticizes theories in which the sensory material of imaginative acts consists in reviving sensory impressions. Based on empirical and philosophical insights, this article explains how simulation theories of imagination can overcome Sartre's critique by paying attention (...)
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  • The Imagery Debate: Analog Media Vs. Tacit Knowledge.Zenon W. Pylyshyn - 1981 - Psychological Review 88 (December):16-45.
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  • Imagination and Power.A. O. Rorty - 1983 - Social Science Information 22 (6):801-816.
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  • Return of the Mental Image: Are There Really Pictures in the Brain?Zenon W. Pylyshyn - 2003 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 7 (3):113-118.
    In the past decade there has been renewed interest in the study of mental imagery. Emboldened by new findings from neuroscience, many people have revived the idea that mental imagery involves a special format of thought, one that is pictorial in nature. But the evidence and the arguments that exposed deep conceptual and empirical problems in the picture theory over the past 300 years have not gone away. I argue that the new evidence from neural imaging and clinical neuropsychology does (...)
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  • Can We Solve the Mind-Body Problem?Colin McGinn - 1989 - Mind 98 (July):349-66.
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  • The Cartesian Theory of Vision.John Hyman - 1986 - Ratio (Misc.) 28 (December):149-167.
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  • Imagination: The Very Idea.Francis Sparshott - 1990 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 48 (1):1-8.
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