Switch to: Citations

Add references

You must login to add references.
  1. From Impossible Words to Conceptual Structure: The Role of Structure and Processes in the Lexicon.Kent Johnson - 2004 - Mind and Language 19 (3):334-358.
    The structure of words is often thought to provide important evidence regarding the structure of concepts. At the same time, most contemporary linguists posit a great deal of structure in words. Such a trend makes some atomists about concepts uncomfortable. The details of linguistic methodology undermine several strategies for avoiding positing structure in words. I conclude by arguing that there is insufficient evidence to hold that word-structure bears any interesting relation to the structure of concepts.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
  • The Origins of Concepts.Daniel A. Weiskopf - 2008 - Philosophical Studies 140 (3):359 - 384.
    Certain of our concepts are innate, but many others are learned. Despite the plausibility of this claim, some have argued that the very idea of concept learning is incoherent. I present a conception of learning that sidesteps the arguments against the possibility of concept learning, and sketch several mechanisms that result in the generation of new primitive concepts. Given the rational considerations that motivate their deployment, I argue that these deserve to be called learning mechanisms. I conclude by replying to (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
  • Meaning's Role in Truth.Charles Travis - 1996 - Mind 105 (419):451-466.
    What words mean plays a role in determining when they would be true; but not an exhaustive one. For that role leaves room for variation in truth conditions, with meanings fixed, from one speaking of words to another. What role meaning plays depends on what truth is; on what words, by virtue of meaning what they do are requied to have done (as spoken) in order to have said what is true. There is a deflationist position on what truth is: (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   33 citations  
  • How to Blunt the Sword of Compositionality.Philip Robbins - 2002 - Noûs 36 (2):313-334.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  • What is Said.François Recanati - 2001 - Synthese 128 (1-2):75--91.
    A critique of the purely semantic, minimalist notion of 'what is said'.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   25 citations  
  • Compositionality, Flexibility, and Context-Dependence.François Recanati - 2012 - In Wolfram Hinzen, Edouard Machery & Markus Werning (eds.), Oxford Handbook of Compositionality. Oxford University Press. pp. 175-191.
    It has often been observed that the meaning of a word may be affected by the other words which occur in the same sentence. How are we to account for this phenomenon of 'semantic flexibility'? It is argued that semantic flexibility reduces to context-sensitivity and does not raise unsurmountable problems for standard compositional accounts. On the other hand, it would be a mistake to assume too simple a view of context-sensitivity. Two basic forms of context-sensitivity are distinguished in the paper. (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  • Semantic Underdetermination and the Cognitive Uses of Language.Agustin Vicente & Fernando Martinez-Manrique - 2005 - Mind and Language 20 (5):537–558.
    According to the thesis of semantic underdetermination, most sentences of a natural language lack a definite semantic interpretation. This thesis supports an argument against the use of natural language as an instrument of thought, based on the premise that cognition requires a semantically precise and compositional instrument. In this paper we examine several ways to construe this argument, as well as possible ways out for the cognitive view of natural language in the introspectivist version defended by Carruthers. Finally, we sketch (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • Thought, Language, and the Argument From Explicitness.Agustín Vicente & Fernando Martínez-Manrique - 2008 - Metaphilosophy 39 (3):381–401.
    This article deals with the relationship between language and thought, focusing on the question of whether language can be a vehicle of thought, as, for example, Peter Carruthers has claimed. We develop and examine a powerful argument—the "argument from explicitness"—against this cognitive role of language. The premises of the argument are just two: (1) the vehicle of thought has to be explicit, and (2) natural languages are not explicit. We explain what these simple premises mean and why we should believe (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • Family Resemblances: Studies in the Internal Structure of Categories.Eleanor Rosch & Carolyn B. Mervis - 1975 - Cognitive Psychology 7 (4):573--605.
    Six experiments explored the hypothesis that the members of categories which are considered most prototypical are those with most attributes in common with other members of the category and least attributes in common with other categories. In probabilistic terms, the hypothesis is that prototypicality is a function of the total cue validity of the attributes of items. In Experiments 1 and 3, subjects listed attributes for members of semantic categories which had been previously rated for degree of prototypicality. High positive (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   176 citations  
  • The Big Book of Concepts.Gregory L. Murphy - 2004 - MIT Press.
    A comprehensive introduction to current research on the psychology of concept formation and use.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   119 citations  
  • The Language of Thought.J. A. Fodor - 1978 - Critica 10 (28):140-143.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   197 citations  
  • Impossible Words: A Reply to Kent Johnson.Jerry Fodor & Ernie LePore - 2005 - Mind and Language 20 (3):353–356.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • How to Acquire a Concept.Eric Margolis - 1998 - Mind and Language 13 (3):347-369.
    In this paper, I develop a novel account of concept acquisition for an atomistic theory of concepts. Conceptual atomism is rarely explored in cognitive science because of the feeling that atomistic treatments of concepts are inherently nativistic. My model illustrates, on the contrary, that atomism does not preclude the learning of a concept.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   33 citations  
  • Unshadowed Thought: Representation in Thought and Language.Charles Travis - 2000 - Cambridge: Harvard University Press.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   27 citations  
  • Unshadowed Thought: Representations in Thought and Language.R. Elugardo & R. J. Stainton - 2002 - Philosophical Review 111 (3):470-473.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
  • The Language of Thought.Jerry A. Fodor - 1975 - Harvard University Press.
    INTRODUCTION: TWO KINDS OF RLDUCTIONISM The man who laughs is the one who has not yet heard the terrible news. BERTHOLD BRECHT I propose, in this book, ...
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1482 citations  
  • Concepts: Where Cognitive Science Went Wrong.Jerry A. Fodor - 1998 - Oxford University Press.
    The renowned philosopher Jerry Fodor, a leading figure in the study of the mind for more than twenty years, presents a strikingly original theory on the basic constituents of thought. He suggests that the heart of cognitive science is its theory of concepts, and that cognitive scientists have gone badly wrong in many areas because their assumptions about concepts have been mistaken. Fodor argues compellingly for an atomistic theory of concepts, deals out witty and pugnacious demolitions of rival theories, and (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   249 citations  
  • What is a Concept, That a Person May Grasp It?Ray S. Jackendoff - 1989 - Mind and Language 4 (1-2):68-102.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   13 citations  
  • Thoughts and Utterances: The Pragmatics of Explicit Communication.Robyn Carston - 2002 - Oxford: Blackwell.
    _Thoughts and Utterances_ is the first sustained investigation of two distinctions which are fundamental to all theories of utterance understanding: the semantics/pragmatics distinction and the distinction between what is explicitly communicated and what is implicitly communicated.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   161 citations  
  • Concepts and Cognitive Science.Stephen Laurence & Eric Margolis - 1999 - In Eric Margolis & Stephen Laurence (eds.), Concepts: Core Readings. MIT Press. pp. 3-81.
    Given the fundamental role that concepts play in theories of cognition, philosophers and cognitive scientists have a common interest in concepts. Nonetheless, there is a great deal of controversy regarding what kinds of things concepts are, how they are structured, and how they are acquired. This chapter offers a detailed high-level overview and critical evaluation of the main theories of concepts and their motivations. Taking into account the various challenges that each theory faces, the chapter also presents a novel approach (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   65 citations  
  • The Mapping Between the Mental and the Public Lexicon.Dan Sperber & Deirdre Wilson - 1998 - In Peter Carruthers & Jill Boucher (eds.), [Book Chapter]. Cambridge University Press. pp. 184-200.
    We argue that the presence of a word in an utterance serves as starting point for a relevance guided inferential process that results in the construction of a contextually appropriate sense. The linguistically encoded sense of a word does not serve as its default interpretation. The cases where the contextually appropriate sense happens to be identical to this linguistic sense have no particular theoretical significance. We explore some of the consequences of this view. One of these consequences is that there (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   13 citations  
  • Representations: Philosophical Essays on the Foundations of Cognitive Science.Jerry A. Fodor - 1981 - MIT Press.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   570 citations  
  • Hume Variations.Jerry A. Fodor - 2005 - Mind 114 (453):141-145.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   15 citations  
  • Literal Meaning.François Recanati - 2007 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 75 (2):487-492.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   120 citations  
  • Literal Meaning.François Recanati - 2002 - Cambridge University Press.
    According to the dominant position among philosophers of language today, we can legitimately ascribe determinate contents to natural language sentences, independently of what the speaker actually means. This view contrasts with that held by ordinary language philosophers fifty years ago: according to them, speech acts, not sentences, are the primary bearers of content. François Recanati argues for the relevance of this controversy to the current debate about semantics and pragmatics. Is 'what is said' determined by linguistic conventions, or is it (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   185 citations  
  • Hume Variations.Jerry A. Fodor - 2003 - Oxford University Press UK.
    Hume? Yes, David Hume, that's who Jerry Fodor looks to for help in advancing our understanding of the mind. Fodor claims his Treatise of Human Nature as the foundational document of cognitive science: it launched the project of constructing an empirical psychology on the basis of a representational theory of mind. Going back to this work after more than 250 years we find that Hume is remarkably perceptive about the components and structure that a theory of mind requires. Careful study (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   40 citations  
  • On Relevance Theory's Atomistic Commitments.Agustin Vicente & Fernando Martinez-Manrique - 2010 - In Belen Soria & Esther Romero (eds.), Explicit Communication: Essays on Robyn Carston’s Pragmatics. Palgrave McMillan.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • Logic, Meaning, and Conversation: Semantical Underdeterminacy, Implicature, and Their Interface.Jay David Atlas - 2005 - Oxford University Press.
    This fresh look at the philosophy of language focuses on the interface between a theory of literal meaning and pragmatics--a philosophical examination of the relationship between meaning and language use and its contexts. Here, Atlas develops the contrast between verbal ambiguity and verbal generality, works out a detailed theory of conversational inference using the work of Paul Grice on Implicature as a starting point, and gives an account of their interface as an example of the relationship between Chomsky's Internalist Semantics (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   15 citations  
  • The Perception of Causality.A. Michotte, T. R. Miles & Elaine Miles - 1963 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 15 (59):254-259.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   166 citations  
  • The Case for Case, Dins.Charles J. Fillmore - 1968 - In Emmon Bach & R. Harms (eds.), Universals in Linguistic Theory. Holt, Rinehart, and Winston.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   93 citations  
  • Principles of Categorization [Електронний Ресурс]/Eleonora Rosch.E. Rosch - 1978 - In Eleanor Rosch & Barbara Lloyd (eds.), Cognition and Categorization. Lawrence Elbaum Associates.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   52 citations  
  • Cognition and Categorization.Eleanor Rosch & Barbara Lloyd (eds.) - 1978 - Lawrence Elbaum Associates.
    Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   356 citations  
  • The Generative Lexicon.James Pustejovsky - 1995 - MIT Press.
    The Generative Lexicon presents a novel and exciting theory of lexical semantics that addresses the problem of the "multiplicity of word meaning" - that is, how ...
    Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   64 citations  
  • Foundations of Language: Brain, Meaning, Grammar, Evolution.Ray Jackendoff - 2002 - Oxford University Press UK.
    Already hailed as a masterpiece, Foundations of Language offers a brilliant overhaul of the last thirty-five years of research in generative linguistics and related fields. "Few books really deserve the cliché 'this should be read by every researcher in the field'," writes Steven Pinker, author of The Language Instinct, "but Ray Jackendoff's Foundations of Language does." Foundations of Language offers a radically new understanding of how language, the brain, and perception intermesh. The book renews the promise of early generative linguistics: (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   94 citations  
  • Procedural Meaning and the Semantics/Pragmatics Interface.Anne Bezuidenhout - 2004 - In Claudia Bianchi (ed.), The Semantics/Pragmatics Distinction. CSLI Publications. pp. 101--131.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Concepts: Core Readings.Eric Margolis & Stephen Laurence (eds.) - 1999 - MIT Press.
    The first part of the book centers around the fall of the Classical Theory of Concepts in the face of attacks by W. V. O. Quine, Ludwig Wittgenstein, Eleanor..
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   79 citations  
  • Replies to the Papers in the Issue "Recanati on Mental Files".François Recanati - 2015 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 58 (4):408-437.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   15 citations  
  • Proper Names.John R. Searle - 1958 - Mind 67 (266):166-173.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   89 citations  
  • The Compositionality Papers.Jerry A. Fodor & Ernest Lepore - 2002 - Oxford University Press.
    Ernie Lepore and Jerry Fodor have published a series of original and controversial essays on issues relating to compositionality in language and mind; they have...
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   47 citations  
  • Impossible Words?Jerry Fodor & Ernest Lepore - 1999 - Linguistic Inquiry 30:445-453.
    The idea that quotidian, middle-level concepts typically have internal structure-definitional, statistical, or whatever—plays a central role in practically every current approach to cognition. Correspondingly, the idea that words that express quotidian, middle-level concepts have complex representations "at the semantic level" is recurrent in linguistics; it is the defining thesis of what is often called "lexical semantics," and it unites the generative and interpretive traditions of grammatical analysis. Hale and Keyser (HK) (1993) have endorsed a version of lexical decomposition according to (...)
    Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations