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  1. A Tale of Two Thinkers, One Meeting, and Three Degrees of Infinity: Leibniz and Spinoza (1675–8).Ohad Nachtomy - 2011 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 19 (5):935-961.
    The article presents Leibniz's preoccupation (in 1675?6) with the difference between the notion of infinite number, which he regards as impossible, and that of the infinite being, which he regards as possible. I call this issue ?Leibniz's Problem? and examine Spinoza's solution to a similar problem that arises in the context of his philosophy. ?Spinoza's solution? is expounded in his letter on the infinite (Ep.12), which Leibniz read and annotated in April 1676. The gist of Spinoza's solution is to distinguish (...)
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  • Leibniz and the Possibility of God's Existence.David Werther - 1996 - Religious Studies 32 (1):37 - 48.
    Toward the end of 1676 Leibniz met Spinoza a number of times. In one of those meetings Leibniz presented a proof of the possibility of God's existence. In his proof Leibniz presupposed that a proposition is necessarily true only if its truth is either demonstrable or self-evident and that the divine perfections are simple and affirmative qualities. I contend that Leibniz's presuppositions undermine, rather than establish, the necessary existence of 'a God of the kind in whom the pious believe'. My (...)
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  • Leibniz and the Modal Argument for God’s Existence.Loren E. Lomasky - 1970 - The Monist 54 (2):250-269.
    In this paper I shall concern myself with the ontological argument as found in Leibniz. In recent years several authors, notable among them Charles Hartshorne and Norman Malcolm, have contended that to speak of the ontological argument or the Anselmian argument is ambiguous, as in Anselm are to be found two logically independent ontological arguments. The more well-known version is from Proslogion II, and it takes existence as a perfection. This is the form of the argument rejected by Gaunilo, Aquinas, (...)
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  • Leibniz, Spinoza, and Tschirnhaus. Metaphysics À Trois, 1675-1676.Mark Kulstad - 2002 - In Olli Koistinen & J. I. Biro (eds.), Spinoza: Metaphysical Themes. Oxford University Press. pp. 182--209.
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  • Leibniz and the Modal Argument for God’s Existence.Loren E. Lomasky - 1970 - The Monist 54 (2):250-269.
    In this paper I shall concern myself with the ontological argument as found in Leibniz. In recent years several authors, notable among them Charles Hartshorne and Norman Malcolm, have contended that to speak of the ontological argument or the Anselmian argument is ambiguous, as in Anselm are to be found two logically independent ontological arguments. The more well-known version is from Proslogion II, and it takes existence as a perfection. This is the form of the argument rejected by Gaunilo, Aquinas, (...)
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  • Leibniz's Ontological and Cosmological Arguments.David Blumenfeld - 1995 - In Nicholas Jolley (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Leibniz. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. pp. 353.
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  • Leibniz on Possible Worlds.Nicholas Rescher - 1996 - Studia Leibnitiana 28 (2):129-162.
    Leibniz' Theorie der möglichen Welten ist ein komplexes Ideengebäude, das er im Lauf der Jahre in verschiedenen Gelegenheitsschriften fortentwickelte. Hier wird diese Theorie systematisch dargestellt. Es werden sowohl die logischen Aspekte der Leibnizschen Möglichkeitstheorie erläutert als auch ihre Verbindungen mit Leibniz' Lehre von Raum und Zeit sowie ihre Beziehungen zu Leibniz' Theologie und insbesondere seiner Schöpfungslehre.
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  • Leibniz's Modal Proof of the Possibility of God.David Blumenfeld - 1972 - Studia Leibnitiana 4 (2):132 - 140.
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