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  1. Articulating Reasons: An Introduction to Inferentialism.Steven Gross - 2002 - Philosophical Review 111 (2):284.
    This is a book review of: Robert B. Brandom, Articulating Reasons: An Introduction to Inferentialism. Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 2000. Pp. 230.
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  • Die Realisierung des Begriffs: Eine Untersuchung Zu Hegels Schlusslehre.Georg Sans - 2004 - De Gruyter.
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  • Collected Papers of Charles Sanders Peirce.Charles S. Peirce - 1931 - Cambridge: Harvard University Press.
    PRINCIPLES OF PHILOSOPHY" CHAPTER 1 LESSONS FROM THE HISTORY OF PHILOSOPHY §1. NOMINALISM* 15. Very early in my studies of logic, before I had really been ...
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  • Two Dogmas of Empiricism.Willard V. O. Quine - 1951 - Philosophical Review 60 (1):20–43.
    Modern empiricism has been conditioned in large part by two dogmas. One is a belief in some fundamental cleavage between truths which are analytic, or grounded in meanings independently of matters of fact, and truth which are synthetic, or grounded in fact. The other dogma is reductionism: the belief that each meaningful statement is equivalent to some logical construct upon terms which refer to immediate experience. Both dogmas, I shall argue, are ill founded. One effect of abandoning them is, as (...)
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  • Studies in the Hegelian Dialectic.Josiah Royce & John Ellis McTaggart - 1897 - Philosophical Review 6 (1):69.
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  • A Commentary on Hegel's Logic.John Grier Hibben, John McTaggart & Ellis McTaggart - 1910 - Philosophical Review 19 (6):639.
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  • John Watson, The Philosophy of Kant Explained. [REVIEW]Norman Smith - 1909 - Philosophical Review 18 (6):646.
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  • Mind, Self and Society.George H. Mead - 1934 - Chicago, Il.
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  • Sein und Schein. Die kritische Funktion der Hegelschen Logik.M. Theunissen - 1980 - Tijdschrift Voor Filosofie 42 (4):823-824.
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  • Knowledge and the Flow of Information.F. Dretske - 1989 - Trans/Form/Ação 12:133-139.
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  • If You Can't Make One, You Don't Know How It Works.Fred Dretske - 1994 - Midwest Studies in Philosophy 19 (1):468-482.
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  • Conventionalism and the Impoverishment of the Space of Reasons: Carnap, Quine and Sellars.Kenneth R. Westphal - 2015 - Journal for the History of Analytical Philosophy 3 (8).
    This article examines how Quine and Sellars develop informatively contrasting responses to a fundamental tension in Carnap’s semantics ca. 1950. Quine’s philosophy could well be styled ‘Essays in Radical Empiricism’; his assay of radical empiricism is invaluable for what it reveals about the inherent limits of empiricism. Careful examination shows that Quine’s criticism of Carnap’s semantics in ‘Two Dogmas of Empiricism’ fails, that at its core Quine’s semantics is for two key reasons incoherent and that his hallmark Thesis of Extensionalism (...)
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  • An Hegelian Solution to a Tangle of Problems Facing Brandom'S Analytic Pragmatism.Paul Redding - 2015 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 23 (4):657-680.
    In his program of analytic pragmatism, Robert Brandom has presented a thoroughgoing reinterpretation of the place of analytic philosophy in the history of philosophy by linking his own non-representational ‘inferentialist’ approach to semantics to the rationalist – idealist tradition, and in particular, to Hegel. Brandom, however, has not been without his critics in regard to both his approach to semantics and his interpretation of Hegel. Here I single out four interlinked problematic areas facing Brandom's inferentialist semantics – his approach of (...)
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  • Hegel and the Identity of Indiscernibles.Henry Southgate - 2014 - Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 96 (1):71-103.
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  • The World Well Lost.Richard Rorty - 1972 - Journal of Philosophy 69 (19):649-665.
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  • Logical Foundations of Probability.Arthur W. Burks - 1951 - Journal of Philosophy 48 (17):524-535.
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  • Mind and the World-Order: Outline of a Theory of Knowledge.Charles A. Baylis - 1930 - Journal of Philosophy 27 (12):320-327.
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  • ‘Analytic Philosophy and the Long Tail of Scientia: Hegel and the Historicity of Philosophy’.Kenneth R. Westphal - 2010 - The Owl of Minerva 42 (1/2):1–18.
    Rejection of the philosophical relevance of history of philosophy remains pronounced within contemporary analytic philosophy. The two main reasons for this rejection presuppose that strict deduction is both necessary and sufficient for rational justification. However, this justificatory ideal of scientia holds only within strictly formal domains. This is confirmed by a neglected non-sequitur in van Fraassen’s original defence of ‘Constructive Empiricism’. Conversely, strict deduction is insufficient for rational justification in non-formal, substantive domains of inquiry. In non-formal, substantive domains, rational justification (...)
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  • The Dialectic of Teleology.Willem A. deVries - 1991 - Philosophical Topics 19 (2):51-70.
    An analysis of Hegel's chapter on teleology in the Science of Logic. Hegel argues that the 'intentional model' of teleology assumed by Kant actually presupposes a natural or organic teleology more like along Aristotelian lines.
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  • Philosophy and the Mirror of Nature.Harry Ruja - 1981 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 42 (2):299-300.
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  • From a Logical Point of View.Richard M. Martin - 1955 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 15 (4):574-575.
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  • The Fixation of Belief.C. S. Peirce - 1877 - Popular Science Monthly 12 (1):1--15.
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  • The Role of Logic "Commonly So Called" in Hegel's Science of Logic.Paul Redding - 2014 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 22 (2):281-301.
    This paper examines Hegel’s accounts of the nature of judgements and inferences in the ‘subjective logic’ of the Science of Logic, and does so in light of the history of the tradition of formal logic to his time. It is argued that, contrary to the attitude often displayed by interpreters of Hegel’s logic, it is important to understand the positive role played by formal logic, ‘logic commonly so called’, in Hegel’s own conception of logic. It is argued that Hegel’s own (...)
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  • Constructions of Reason: Explorations of Kant's Practical Philosophy.Stephen Engstrom - 1989 - Ethics 102 (3):653-655.
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  • Hegel, Hume und die Identität wahrnehmbarer Dinge. Historisch-kritische Analyse zum Kapitel 'Wahrnehmung' in der Phänomenologie von 1807.[author unknown] - 1999 - Tijdschrift Voor Filosofie 61 (1):171-172.
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  • The Ontology of Complex Systems: Levels of Organization, Perspectives, and Causal Thickets.William C. Wimsatt - 1994 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy, Supplementary Volume 20:207-274.
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  • Consequences of Pragmatism.Richard Rorty - 1984 - Erkenntnis 21 (3):423-431.
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  • On Taking the Transcendental Turn.Klaus Hartmann - 1966 - Review of Metaphysics 20 (2):223 - 249.
    THIS PAPER is not a piece of "research"; it simply offers a series of reflections on the transcendental method. It is occasioned by the realization that, while this method is interesting and important in the opinion of some, it can count on little familiarity in the United States. And where philosophers and students of philosophy make the effort, they have great difficulty appreciating transcendental philosophy or understanding its proposals. This difficulty is, as I say, largely circumstantial and due to a (...)
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  • Emergence as Non-Aggregativity and the Biases of Reductionisms.William C. Wimsatt - 2000 - Foundations of Science 5 (3):269-297.
    Most philosophical accounts of emergence are incompatible with reduction. Most scientists regard a system property as emergent relative to properties of its parts if it depends upon their mode of organization-a view consistent with reduction. Emergence is a failure of aggregativity, in which ``the whole is nothing more than the sum of its parts''. Aggregativity requires four conditions, giving powerful tools for analyzing modes of organization. Differently met for different decompositions of the system, and in different degrees, the structural conditions (...)
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  • Ontology and Ideology.W. V. Quine - 1951 - Philosophical Studies 2 (1):11 - 15.
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  • Conceptual Pragmatism.Peter Carruthers - 1987 - Synthese 73 (2):205 - 224.
    The paper puts forward the thesis of conceptual pragmatism: that there are pragmatic choices to be made between distinct but similar concepts within various contexts. It is argued that this thesis should be acceptable to all who believe in concepts, whether the believers are platonists, realists or anti-realists. It is argued that the truth of the thesis may help to resolve many long-standing debates, and that in any case it will lead to an extension of philosophical method. The paper then (...)
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  • Epistemic Circularity.William P. Alston - 1986 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 47 (1):1-30.
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  • Hegel's Pragmatic Critique and Reconstruction of Kant's System of Principles in the 1807 Phenomenology of Spirit.Kenneth R. Westphal - 2015 - Hegel Bulletin 36 (2):159-183.
    Peirce's study of Kant, and later of Hegel, and Dewey's retention of much of Hegel's social philosophy are recognised idealist sources of pragmatism. Here I argue that the transition from idealism to pragmatic realism was already achieved by Hegel. Hegel's ‘Objective Logic’ corresponds in part to Kant's ‘Transcendental Logic’. Hegel faults Kant for relegating concepts of reflection to an Appendix to his Transcendental Logic, and for treating reason as ‘only dialectical’ and as ‘merely regulative’. I present three important yet neglected (...)
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  • Autonomy, Freedom & Embodiment: Hegel's Critique of Contemporary Biologism.Kenneth R. Westphal - 2014 - Hegel Bulletin 35 (1):56-83.
    The apparent implications of the latest findings of the life sciences for our freedom and autonomy are both exciting and controversial: They undermine a common view of human freedom: a fundamentally Cartesian view. A superior account of our freedom was developed by Kant and Hegel. Key features of Hegel's account show that we can expect from the life sciences further insights into the biological basis of our freedom and autonomy, but not their repudiation. I begin with basic features of Cartesian (...)
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  • Farewell to Objectivity: A Critique of Brandom.Sven Rosenkranz - 2001 - Philosophical Quarterly 51 (203):232-237.
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  • On the Relation Between “Mode” and “Measure” in Hegel’s Science of Logic: Some Introductory Remarks.Cinzia Ferrini - 1988 - The Owl of Minerva 20 (1):21-49.
    To readers of the Science of Logic, “mode” signifies the externality of the absolute, and its proper place within the text is at the level of the determinations of reflection, within the Doctrine of Essence. Let us take a look at the third section of the Doctrine of Essence: “Actuality”. In its broadest meaning, this signifies “reflected absoluteness,” that is to say, the unity of essence and existence; therefore, it is not a purely immediate existence, but “the immediate unity of (...)
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  • From Geological to Animal Nature in Hegel's Idea of Life.Cinzia Ferrini - 2009 - Hegel-Studien 44:45-93.
    My aim in this essay is to lead the reader through the complexity of Hegel’s philosophical understanding of organic nature by highlighting its distinctive theoretical features and by examining these historically, both against the background of the approaches, achievements and trends of the empirical sciences of his time and in light of their scholarly reception.1 First, I focuss on Hegel’s definition of the ‘universal form’ of life, pointing to what the connection is, in his philosophy of nature, between the structure (...)
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  • Logica e filosofia della natura nella 'dottrina dell'essere' hegeliana.Cinzia Ferrini - 1991 - Rivista di Storia Della Filosofia 46 (4):701.
    Any historical and critical appreciation of Hegel's basic thesis of the identity of metaphysics with logic cannot fail to compare it with his charging Kant and Fichte with attaching a merely subjective meaning to logical determinations, as well as Schelling with spinozism and extrinsicalness in conceiving the absolute indifference of subject with object. This paper aims to give an account of Hegel's notion of nature as it arises from the fulfillment of the logical idea (as the Anderssein of the idea (...)
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  • The Philosophy of Hegel: A Systematic Exposition.W. T. STACE - 1925 - Philosophical Review 34:521.
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  • Philosophy and the Mirror of Nature.Richard Rorty - 1979 - Revue Philosophique de la France Et de l'Etranger 170 (4):463-464.
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  • Modality, Normativity, and Intentionality.Robert Brandom - 2001 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 63 (3):611-23.
    A striking feature of the contemporary philosophical scene is the flourishing of a number of research programs aimed in one way or another at making intentional soup out of nonintentional bones—more carefully, specifying in a resolutely nonintentional, nonsemantic vocabulary, sufficient conditions for states of an organism or other system to qualify as contentful representations. This is a movement with a number of players, but for my purposes here, the work of Dretske, Fodor, and Millikan can serve as paradigms. The enterprise (...)
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  • Intelligenz and the Interpretation of Hegel’s Idealism: Some Hermeneutic Pointers.Kenneth R. Westphal - 2007 - The Owl of Minerva 39 (1/2):95-134.
    Hegel’s idealism and his epistemology have been seriously misunderstood due to various deep-set preconceptions of Hegel’s expositors. Thesepreconceptions include: Idealism is inherently subjective; Hegel’s epistemology invokes intellectual intuition; Hegel was not much concerned with natural science; Natural science has no basic role to play in Hegel’s Logic. In criticizing these notions, I highlight four key features of Hegel’s account of intelligence: Human cognition is active, and forges genuine cognitive links to objects that exist and have intrinsic characteristics, regardless of what (...)
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  • Practical Reason: Categorical Imperative, Maxims, Laws.Kenneth R. Westphal - 2010 - In W. Dudley & K. Engelhard (eds.), Kant: Key Concepts. Acumen Publishing.
    This chapter considers the centrality of principles in Kant’s moral philosophy, their distinctively ‘Kantian’ character, why Kant presents a ‘metaphysical’ system of moral principles and how these ‘formal’ principles are to be used in practice. These points are central to how Kant thinks pure reason can be practical. These features have often puzzled Anglophone readers, in part due to focusing on Kant’s Groundwork, to the neglect of his later works in moral philosophy, in which the theoretical preliminaries of that first (...)
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  • Hegel, Peirce, and Royce on the Concept of Essence.John Kaag - 2011 - Dialogue 50 (3):557-575.
    ABSTRACT: This article focuses on the role that Hegels discussion of Hegel and Peirce by claiming that the second book of HegelThe Doctrine of Essence,s attempt to account for the experimental and turbulent character of human experience, a character that Peirce would term While Pierce remained dissatisfied with Hegels detailed understanding of Hegel.
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  • Hume, Empiricism and the Generality of Thought.Kenneth R. Westphal - 2013 - Dialogue 52 (2):233-270.
    Hume sought to analyse our propositionally-structured thought in terms of our ultimate awareness of nothing but objects, sensory impressions or their imagistic copies, The ideas of space and time are often regarded as exceptions to his Copy Theory of impressions and ideas. On grounds strictly internal to Humes account of the generality of thought. This ultimately reveals the limits of the Copy Theory and of Concept Empiricism. The key is to recognise how very capacious is our (Humean) imaginative capacity to (...)
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  • Kant, Hegel, and the Transcendental Material Conditions of Possible Experience.Kenneth R. Westphal - 1996 - Hegel Bulletin 17 (1):23-41.
    I argue that Hegel is aware of a crucial problem in Kant’s transcendental account of the conditions of human knowledge. Unless the matter of sensation is sufficiently ordered (and sufficiently varied) we could not make any cognitive judgments. In that case we could not distinguish ourselves from objects we know, and so could not be self-conscious. This is a necessary, formal and transcendental condition of possible human experience. However, it is also (as Kant acknowledged) a material – not a conceptual (...)
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  • German Idealism. The Struggle against Subjectivism, 1781-1801.Frederick Beiser - 2002 - Filosoficky Casopis 51 (449):338-344.
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  • Robert Brandom Über Singuläre Termini.Daniel Dohrn - 2009 - Zeitschrift für Philosophische Forschung 63 (3):453-465.
    Robert Brandom charakterisiert singuläre Termini durch ihre symmetrische substitutionsinferentielle Rolle. Er entwickelt ein transzendentales Argument, wonach solche Termini notwendig für jede Sprache sind, welche die üblichen logischen Ausdrucksressourcen wie Negation und Konditional besitzt. Verschiedene Einwände werden diskutiert. Brandom kann die Forderung erfüllen, dass die Semantik einer Sprache kompositional sein muss. Er kann auch mit der asymmetrischen inferentiellen Rolle bestimmter singulärer Termini umgehen, sofern diese nicht systematisch ist. Aber er kann der Möglichkeit nicht gerecht werden, singuläre Termini einzuführen, die nicht durch (...)
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  • Response to Pinkard.Frederick C. Beiser - 1996 - Hegel Bulletin 17 (2):21-26.
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  • ‘Consciousness, Scepticism and the Critique of Categorial Concepts in Hegel’s 1807 Phenomenology of Spirit’.Kenneth R. Westphal - 2009 - In M. Bykova & M. Solopova (eds.), Сущность и Слово. Сборник научных статей к юбилею профессора Н.В.Мотрошиловой. Phenomenology & Hermeneutics Press.
    This paper (in English) highlights a hitherto neglected feature of Hegel’s 1807 Phenomenology of Spirit: its critique of the content of our basic categorial concepts. It focusses on Hegel’s semantics of cognitive reference in ‘Sense Certainty’ and his use of this semantics also in ‘Perception’ and ‘Force and Understanding’. Explicating these points enables us to understand how Hegel criticizes Pyrrhonian Scepticism on internal grounds.
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