Switch to: Citations

Add references

You must login to add references.
  1. Reasons and Persons.Derek Parfit - 1984 - Oxford University Press.
    Challenging, with several powerful arguments, some of our deepest beliefs about rationality, morality, and personal identity, Parfit claims that we have a false view about our own nature. It is often rational to act against our own best interersts, he argues, and most of us have moral views that are self-defeating. We often act wrongly, although we know there will be no one with serious grounds for complaint, and when we consider future generations it is very hard to avoid conclusions (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1801 citations  
  • Reasons and Persons.Joseph Margolis - 1986 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 47 (2):311-327.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1630 citations  
  • Response to Commentaries.Julian Savulescu, Thomas Douglas & Ingmar Persson - 2014 - In Akira Akabayashi (ed.), The Future of Bioethics: International Dialogues. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Should We Replace Disabled Newborn Infants?Dominic Wilkinson - 2011 - Journal of Moral Philosophy 8 (3):390-414.
    If a disabled newborn infant dies, her parents may be able to conceive another child without impairment. This is sometimes referred to as 'replacement'. Some philosophers have argued that replacement provides a strong reason for disabled newborns to be killed or allowed to die. In this paper I focus on the case for replacement as it relates to decisions about life support in newborn intensive care. I argue (following Jeff McMahan) that the impersonal reason to replace is weak and easily (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Bodies for Sale: Ethics and Exploitation in the Human Body Trade.James Taylor - 2005 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 8 (5):579-581.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   27 citations  
  • Bodies for Sale: Ethics and Exploitation in the Human Body Trade.Stephen Wilkinson - 2003 - Routledge.
    _Bodies for Sale: Ethics and Exploitation in the Human Body Trade _explores the philosophical and practical issues raised by activities such as surrogacy and organ trafficking. Stephen Wilkinson asks what is it that makes some commercial uses of the body controversial, whether the arguments against commercial exploitation stand up, and whether legislation outlawing such practices is really justified. In Part One Wilkinson explains and analyses some of the notoriously slippery concepts used in the body commodification debate, including exploitation, harm and (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   32 citations  
  • Causing People to Exist and Saving People’s Lives.Jeff McMahan - 2013 - Journal of Ethics 17 (1-2):5-35.
    Most people are skeptical of the claim that the expectation that a person would have a life that would be well worth living provides a reason to cause that person to exist. In this essay I argue that to cause such a person to exist would be to confer a benefit of a noncomparative kind and that there is a moral reason to bestow benefits of this kind. But this conclusion raises many problems, among which is that it must be (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   19 citations  
  • Parental Refusals of Medical Treatment: The Harm Principle as Threshold for State Intervention.Douglas Diekema - 2004 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 25 (4):243-264.
    Minors are generally considered incompetent to provide legally binding decisions regarding their health care, and parents or guardians are empowered to make those decisions on their behalf. Parental authority is not absolute, however, and when a parent acts contrary to the best interests of a child, the state may intervene. The best interests standard is the threshold most frequently employed in challenging a parent''s refusal to provide consent for a child''s medical care. In this paper, I will argue that the (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   78 citations  
  • Why Does It Matter How We Regulate the Use of Human Body Parts?Imogen Goold - 2014 - Journal of Medical Ethics 40 (1):3-9.
    Human tissue and body parts have been used in one way or another for millennia. They have been preserved and displayed, both in museums and public shows. Real human hair is used for wigs, while some artists even use human tissue in their works. Blood, bone marrow, whole organs and a host of other structures and human substances are all transplanted into living persons to treat illness. New life can be created from gametes through in vitro fertilisation , while the (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Parental, Medical, and Sociological Responsibilities: “Octomom” as a Case Study in the Ethics of Fertility Treatments.Bertha Alvarez Manninen - 2011 - Journal of Clinical Research and Bioethics 2 (1).
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • On Liberty.JOHN STUART MILL - 1956 - In Steven M. Cahn (ed.), Exploring Philosophy: An Introductory Anthology. Oxford University Press. pp. 519-522.
    This was scanned from the 1909 edition and mechanically checked against a commercial copy of the text from CDROM. Differences were corrected against the paper edition. The text itself is thus a highly accurate rendition. The footnotes were entered manually.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   174 citations  
  • On Liberty.John Stuart Mill - 1956 - Broadview Press.
    In this work, Mill reflects on the struggle between liberty and authority and defends the view that “the only purpose for which power can be rightfully exercised over any member of a civilized community, against his will, is to prevent harm to others.” He questions the justification for the limits of freedom of conscience and religion, freedom of speech, freedom of action, and the nature of liberalism itself. This new Broadview Edition demonstrates the ways in which Mill’s intellectual landscape differed (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   23 citations  
  • Comment on Narveson: In Defense of Equality: Ronald Dworkin.Ronald Dworkin - 1983 - Social Philosophy and Policy 1 (1):24-40.
    Professor Narveson's comments about my papers on equality are both penetrating and comprehensive. I cannot hope to discuss all the issues he raises in any detail. But there is a special problem: his main question is about what I have not said. He asks how I might defend equality of resources other than simply by describing a version of it, and of course this question will require some extended discussion. But he is right to say that this is his most (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   30 citations  
  • Is There a Coherent Social Conception of Disability?J. Harris - 2000 - Journal of Medical Ethics 26 (2):95-100.
    Is there such a thing as a social conception of disability? Recently two writers in this journal have suggested not only that there is a coherent social conception of disability but that all non-social conceptions, or “medical models” of disability are fatally flawed. One serious and worrying dimension of their claims is that once the social dimensions of disability have been resolved no seriously “disabling” features remain. This paper examines and rejects conceptions of disability based on social factors but notes (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   34 citations  
  • Liberal Rationalism And Medical Decision‐Making.Julian Savulescu - 1997 - Bioethics 11 (2):115–129.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  • When Intuition is Not Enough. Why the Principle of Procreative Beneficence Must Work Much Harder to Justify Its Eugenic Vision.Rebecca Bennett - 2014 - Bioethics 28 (9):447-455.
    The Principle of Procreative Beneficence claims that we have a moral obligation, where choice is possible, to choose to create the best child we can. The existence of this moral obligation has been proposed by John Harris and Julian Savulescu and has proved controversial on many levels, not least that it is eugenics, asking us to produce the best children we can, not for the sake of that child's welfare, but in order to make a better society. These are strong (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  • Procreative Beneficence: Why We Should Select the Best Children.Julian Savulescu - 2001 - Bioethics 15 (5-6):413-426.
    We have a reason to use information which is available about such genes in our reproductive decision-making; (3) couples should selec.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   181 citations  
  • The Determination of the Best Interests in Relation to Childhood Immunisation.Angus Dawson - 2005 - Bioethics 19 (1):72-89.
    ABSTRACTThere are many different ethical arguments that might be advanced for and against childhood vaccinations. In this paper I explore one particular argument that focuses on the idea that such vaccinations are justifiable because they are held to be in the best interests of a particular child. Two issues arise from this idea. The first issue is how best interests are to be determined in this case. The second issue is what follows from this to justify potential interventions within the (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
  • Autonomy Does Not Confer Sovereignty on the Patient: A Commentary on the Golubchuk Case.John J. Paris - 2010 - American Journal of Bioethics 10 (3):54-56.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  • Rational Non-Interventional Paternalism: Why Doctors Ought to Make Judgments of What is Best for Their Patients.J. Savulescu - 1995 - Journal of Medical Ethics 21 (6):327-331.
    This paper argues that doctors ought to make all things considered value judgments about what is best for their patients. It illustrates some of the shortcomings of the model of doctor as 'fact-provider'. The 'fact-provider' model fails to take account of the fact that practising medicine necessarily involves making value judgments; that medical practice is a moral practice and requires that doctors reflect on what ought to be done, and that patients can make choices which fail to express their autonomy (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   32 citations