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Bruce Reichenbach [6]Bruce R. Reichenbach [2]
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Bruce Reichenbach
Augsburg College
  1. God, Evil, and Meticulous Providence.Bruce Reichenbach - 2022 - Religions 13.
    James Sterba has constructed a powerful argument for there being a conflict between the presence of evil in the world and the existence of God. I contend that Sterba’s argument depends on a crucial assumption, namely, that God has an obligation to act according to the principle of meticulous providence. I suggest that two of his analogies confirm his dependence on this requirement. Of course, his argument does not rest on either of these analogies, but they are illustrative of the (...)
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  2. Christianity, science, and three phases of being human.Bruce R. Reichenbach - 2021 - Zygon 56 (1):96-117.
    The alleged conflict between religion and science most pointedly focuses on what it is to be human. Western philosophical thought regarding this has progressed through three broad stages: mind/body dualism, Neo-Darwinism, and most recently strong artificial intelligence (AI). I trace these views with respect to their relation to Christian views of humans, suggesting that while the first two might be compatible with Christian thought, strong AI presents serious challenges to a Christian understanding of personhood, including our freedom to choose, moral (...)
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  3. Defending Compatibilism.Bruce Reichenbach - 2017 - Science, Religion, and Culture 2 (4):63-71.
    It is a truism that where one starts from and the direction one goes determines where one ends up. This is no less true in philosophy than elsewhere, and certainly no less true in matters dealing with the relationship between God’s foreknowledge and human free actions. In what follows I will argue that the incompatibilist view that Fischer and others stalwartly defend results from the particular starting point they choose, and that if one adopts a different starting point about divine (...)
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  4. Is the Cosmological Argument a Good Argument?Bruce Reichenbach - 2022 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 92 (3):129-145.
    Over the course of his work, Graham Oppy developed numerous important criticisms of versions of the cosmological argument. In this article I am not concerned with his specific criticisms of cosmological arguments but rather with his claim that the cosmological arguments per se are not good arguments, for they provide no persuasive or convincing reason for believing the conclusion that God exists and are embedded in theories that already affirm the conclusion. I want to explore what he believes makes an (...)
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  5.  92
    The divine command theory and objective good.Bruce R. Reichenbach - 1984 - In Rocco Porreco (ed.), Georgetown Symposium on Ethics. Washington DC: University Press of America. pp. 219-233.
    I reply to criticisms of the divine command theory with an eye to noting the relation of ethics to an ontological ground. The criticisms include: the theory makes the standard of right and wrong arbitrary, it traps the defender of the theory in a vicious circle, it violates moral autonomy, it is a relic of our early deontological state of moral development. I then suggest how Henry Veatch's view of good as an ontological feature of the world provides a context (...)
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  6.  84
    On James Sterba’s Refutation of Theistic Arguments to Justify Suffering.Bruce Reichenbach - 2021 - Religions 12 (1).
    In his recent book Is a Good God Logically Possible? and article by the same name, James Sterba argued that the existence of significant and horrendous evils, both moral and natural, is incompatible with the existence of God. He advances the discussion by invoking three moral requirements and by creating an analogy with how the just state would address such evils, while protecting significant freedoms and rights to which all are entitled. I respond that his argument has important ambiguities and (...)
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  7.  89
    Assessing a Revised Compensation Theodicy.Bruce Reichenbach - 2022 - Religions 13.
    Attempts to resolve the problem of evil often appeal to a greater good, according to which God’s permission of moral and natural evil is justified because (and just in case) the evil that is permitted is necessary for the realization of some greater good. In the extensive litany of greater good theodicies and defenses, the appeal to the greater good of an afterlife of infinite reward or pleasure has played a minor role in Christian thought but a more important role (...)
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  8. On Being a Professor: The Case of Socrates.Bruce Reichenbach - 1997 - In David W. Gill (ed.), SHOULD GOD GET TENURE? ESSAYS ON RELIGION AND HIGHER EDUCATION. Grand Rapids, MI: Wiiliam B. Eerdmans Publishers. pp. 8-26.
    It is commonly held that professors in university communities should not profess but should uphold the ideals of presuppositionless investigation, unbiased presentation of materials, and open dialogue. In particular it is believed that professors professing in the classroom is inconsistent with being a truly Socratic professor. I argue that this is a misreading of Socrates' claim not to know (be barren), but rather is a result of three myths: the myths of neutrality, of expressionism, and of denigration, and that when (...)
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