Results for 'Classical Greek Philosophy'

1000+ found
Order:
  1. On the transmission of Greek philosophy to medieval Muslim philosophers.Ishraq Ali - 2022 - HTS Theological Studies 78 (4):8.
    There are two dominant approaches towards understanding medieval Muslim philosophy: Greek ancestry approach and religiopolitical context approach. In the Greek ancestry approach, medieval Muslim philosophy is interpreted in terms of its relation to classical Greek philosophy, particularly to the philosophy of Plato and Aristotle. The religiopolitical context approach, however, views a thorough understanding of the religious and political situation of that time as the key to the proper understanding of medieval Muslim (...). Notwithstanding the immense significance of the two approaches for understanding medieval Muslim philosophy, the question on the reason behind medieval Muslim philosophers’ preference for Plato’s Republic over Aristotle’s Politics in political philosophy is not accurately answered. This preference is usually attributed either to the availability or unavailability of the text or to the suitability or unsuitability of the text for Islamic theological views. However, this article shows that neither the availability or unavailability of text nor its suitability or unsuitability for Islamic religious and theological views can appropriately explain medieval Muslim philosophers’ preference for Plato’s Republic over Aristotle’s Politics in their political thought. This article proposes that the key to understand this preference lies in understanding the transmission of Greek philosophy to medieval Muslim philosophers. Contribution: This study highlights the significance of the thorough understanding of the transmission of Greek philosophy to medieval Muslim world as one of the important approaches towards proper understanding of medieval Muslim philosophy, particularly medieval Muslim political philosophy. (shrink)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  2. Hope in Ancient Greek Philosophy.G. Scott Gravlee - 2020 - In Historical and Multidisciplinary Perspectives on Hope. Cham: pp. 3-23.
    This chapter aims to illuminate ways in which hope was significant in the philosophy of classical Greece. Although ancient Greek philosophies contain few dedicated and systematic expositions on the nature of hope, they nevertheless include important remarks relating hope to the good life, to reason and deliberation, and to psychological phenomena such as memory, imagination, fear, motivation, and pleasure. After an introductory discussion of Hesiod and Heraclitus, the chapter focuses on Plato and Aristotle. Consideration is given both (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  3. Kierkegaard and Greek philosophy.Rick Anthony Furtak - 2013 - In John Lippitt & George Pattison (eds.), The Oxford handbook of Kierkegaard. Oxford, U.K.: Oxford University Press. pp. 129-149.
    This chapter analyses Soren Kierkegaard's thoughts and opinions about ancient Greek philosophy. It examines the significance of Kierkegaard's references to Greek philosophy in his writings and suggests that his use of classical thought was part of his effort to define his own intellectual project. The chapter investigates how Greek philosophy influenced Kierkegaard's works and views about ethics, existential thought, Socratic faith, love, and virtue, and also considers what Kierkegaard believed was the legacy of (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  4. Skepticism in Classical Indian Philosophy.Matthew R. Dasti - forthcoming - In Diego Machuca & Baron Reed (eds.), Skepticism from Antiquity to the Present.
    There are some tantalizing suggestions that Pyrrhonian skepticism has its roots in ancient India. Of them, the most important is Diogenes Laertius’s report that Pyrrho accompanied Alexander to India, where he was deeply impressed by the character of the “naked sophists” he encountered (DL IX 61). Influenced by these gymnosophists, Pyrrho is said to have adopted the practices of suspending judgment on matters of belief and cultivating an indifferent composure amid the vicissitudes of ordinary life. Such conduct, and the attitudes (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5. The Last Word in Greek Philosophy.David Kolb - 1990 - In Postmodern Sphistications: Philosophy, Architecture, and Tradition. Chicago: University of Chicago Press. pp. 17-25.
    What does it take to settle an argument or debate, for the classical Greek philosophers, and how does this compare with our modern ideas about resolving disputes? Plato and Aristotle are not quite what they been reputed to be.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6. Dewey and “the Greeks:” Inquiry and the Organic Spirit of Greek Philosophy.Christopher Kirby - 2014 - In Christopher C. Kirby (ed.), Dewey and the Ancients: Essays on Hellenic and Hellenistic Themes in the Philosophy of John Dewey. London, UK: pp. 47-76.
    Those who have considered the connection between Dewey’s theory of inquiry and Greek thought have mostly situated their remarks within larger points, regarding either teaching and learning (Garrison, 1997; Johnston, 2006b; Cahn, 2007) or aesthetics and craft (Alexander, 1987; Hickman, 1990). The fact that this area remains somewhat underexplored could be chalked up to several factors: 1) Dewey was often quite critical of the classical tradition, particularly when it came to theories of knowledge, 2) Dewey was not a (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  7. The Cambridge Companion to Early Greek Philosophy[REVIEW]Monte Johnson - 2000 - Bryn Mawr Classical Review 2000 (03.12).
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  8. Rez. „Adam Drozdek: In the Beginning Was the Apeiron: Infinity in Greek Philosophy, Stuttgart: Steiner, 2008“. [REVIEW]Sergiusz Kazmierski - 2010 - Bryn Mawr Classical Review 2010.
    Es ist das Verdienst der Arbeit von Adam Drozdek, in einem noch grösseren historischen Umfang sowie mit einer noch stärkeren thematischen Gewichtung und Stringenz als dies bereits Sinnige getan hat, nicht nur die entscheidendste Phase der griechischen Philosophie, sondern auch der Mathematik, ausgehend vom physikalischen und mathematischen Infinitätsgedanken dargestellt zu haben.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  9.  20
    Greek Schools, Roman Heirs, and Unhappy Consciousness in Cicero's Academica.George Saad - 2021 - Borderless Philosophy 4:244-263.
    Cicero’s "Academica" offers a particularly rich demonstration of how the unhappy dialectic between stoicism and skepticism engages Roman historical self-consciousness. The Hegelian thesis of philosophy as mediated through historical development is given a clear articulation in the “derivative” Romans, precisely through their reception of a tradition, their experience of philosophy as inseparable from the self-consciousness of historical relation. The dispute happening in the "Academica" between a dogmatic stoicism and academic skepticism thus directly echoes the problems of contemporary 21st (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  10. Review of Harte and Lane, eds., Politeia in Greek and Roman Philosophy[REVIEW]Thornton Lockwood - 2014 - Bryn Mawr Classical Review 8:48.
    Malcolm Schofield, the honorand of this Festschrift, needs no introduction to scholars working in classics and ancient philosophy. The volume includes a six and a half page bibliography of his works over the last 30 years, and his books, translations, edited collections, and articles range over all subsections and periods of ancient philosophy, from the pre-Socratics through Hellenistic Greek and Roman philosophy. His two most recent books--<i>Plato: Political Philosophy</i> (Oxford, 2006) and an edited volume of (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  11. From Conceivability to Existence and then to Ethics: Parmenides' Being, Anselm's God and Spinoza's Rejection of Evil.Evangelos D. Protopapadakis - 2013 - Journal of Classical Studies MS 15:149-156.
    Classical Greek philosophy in its struggle to grasp the material world from its very beginning has been marked by the – sometimes undercurrent, some others overt and even intense, but never idle – juxtaposition between the mind and the senses, logos and perception or, if the anachronism is allowed, between realism and idealism. Parmenides is reportedly the first philosopher to insistently assert that thought and being are the same by his famous aphorism τὸ γὰρ αὐτὸ νοεῖν ἐστί (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  12. The Problem of Modern Greek Identity: from the Εcumene to the Nation-State.Georgios Steiris, Sotiris Mitralexis & George Arabatzis - 2016 - Cambridge Scholars Press.
    The question of Modern Greek identity is certainly timely. The political events of the previous years have once more brought up such questions as: What does it actually mean to be a Greek today? What is Modern Greece, apart from and beyond the bulk of information that one would find in an encyclopaedia and the established stereotypes? This volume delves into the timely nature of these questions and provides answers not by referring to often-cited classical Antiquity, nor (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  13. Greek and Roman Logic.Robby Finley, Justin Vlasits & Katja Maria Vogt - 2019 - Oxford Bibliographies in Classics.
    In ancient philosophy, there is no discipline called “logic” in the contemporary sense of “the study of formally valid arguments.” Rather, once a subfield of philosophy comes to be called “logic,” namely in Hellenistic philosophy, the field includes (among other things) epistemology, normative epistemology, philosophy of language, the theory of truth, and what we call logic today. This entry aims to examine ancient theorizing that makes contact with the contemporary conception. Thus, we will here emphasize the (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  14. Classical Thought in Newton's General Scholium.Karin Verelst - forthcoming - In Stephen Snobelen, Scott Mandelbrote & Stephen Ducheyne (eds.), Isaac Newton's General Scholium: science, religion, metaphysics.
    Isaac Newton, in popular imagination the Ur-scientist, was an outstanding humanist scholar. His researches on, among others, ancient philosophy, are thorough and appear to be connected to and fit within his larger philosophical and theological agenda. It is therefore relevant to take a closer look at Newton’s intellectual choices, at how and why precisely he would occupy himself with specific text-sources, and how this interest fits into the larger picture of his scientific and intellectual endeavours. In what follows, we (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  15. Moral Archetypes - Ethics in Prehistory.Roberto Arruda - 2019 - Terra à Vista - ISBN-10: 1698168292 ISBN-13: 978-1698168296.
    ABSTRACT The philosophical tradition approaches to morals have their grounds predominantly on metaphysical and theological concepts and theories. Among the traditional ethics concepts, the most prominent is the Divine Command Theory (DCT). As per the DCT, God gives moral foundations to the humankind by its creation and through Revelation. Morality and Divinity are inseparable since the most remote civilization. These concepts submerge in a theological framework and are largely accepted by most followers of the three Abrahamic traditions: Judaism, Christianity, and (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  16. Aristotle and the Classical Paradigm of Wisdom.Jason Costanzo - 2021 - Philosophy International Journal 4 (3).
    The essay examines the ancient Greek origin of philosophy relative to the concept of wisdom. The nature of the sage is first considered. The sage is one who is deemed wise in his or her performances. But what is ‘wise’ about such performances? The Socratic denial of sage status is considered in reference to this. Socrates concludes that he is not wise as the gods are wise, but that he is wise insofar as he knows that he is (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  17. Metaphysical and Postmetaphysical Relationships of Humans with Nature and Life.Guenther Witzany - 2010 - In Biocommunication and Natural Genome Editing. Dordrecht: Springer. pp. 01-26.
    First, I offer a short overview on the classical occidental philosophy as propounded by the ancient Greeks and the natural philosophies of the last 2000 years until the dawn of the empiricist logic of science in the twentieth century, which wanted to delimitate classical metaphysics from empirical sciences. In contrast to metaphysical concepts which didn’t reflect on the language with which they tried to explain the whole realm of entities empiricist logic of science initiated the end of (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
  18. Essentialism in Biology.John S. Wilkins - manuscript
    Essentialism in philosophy is the position that things, especially kinds of things, have essences, or sets of properties, that all members of the kind must have, and the combination of which only members of the kind do, in fact, have. It is usually thought to derive from classical Greek philosophy and in particular from Aristotle’s notion of “what it is to be” something. In biology, it has been claimed that pre-evolutionary views of living kinds, or as (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  19. Restorative Pain: A new vision of punishment.Theo Gavrielides (ed.) - 2013 - Furnham: Ashgate.
    The chapter revisits the relationship between restorative justice and punishment through the eyes of Classical Greek philosophy and tragedy, the School of Collectivists, and contemporary thinkers. The extant literature sees restorative justice either as alternative punishment or an alternative to punishment. This chapter puts forward the notion of restorative punishment by deconstructing the concept of pain, and by reconstructing a new vision through the notion of catharsis. The chapter then takes a bold step in proposing a philosophical (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  20. The Significance of "kata pant a<s>tê" [Greek] in Parmenides Fr. 1.3.J. H. Lesher - 1994 - Ancient Philosophy 14 (1):1-20.
    Fragment B 1 of Parmenides describes a youth's journey to the house of a goddess who enlightens him as to the nature of all things. The task of translating Parmenides' Greek text is beset with many difficulties, most notably the phrase kata pant' atê at B 1.3. There, the neuter accusative plural panta ('all things') combines with the feminine nominative singular atê (heavenly sent blindness') to render translation impossible. Some have proposed emending the text to read a<s>tê ('down to (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  21. Theophrast: Metaphysik.Gregor Damschen, Dominic Kaegi & Enno Rudolph - 2012 - Hamburg: Meiner.
    Theophrastus' treatise "Metaphysics" contains a compact and critical reconstruction of unsolved systematic problems of classical Greek philosophy. It is primarily about fundamental problems of ontology and natural philosophy, such as the question of the interdependence of principles and perceptible phenomena or the plausibility of teleology as a methodical principle of the explanation of nature. The aim of the critical Greek-German edition (with introduction and commentary) is to make visible the systematic significance of Theophrastus' critique of (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  22. On the practice of integrated STEM education as “poiesis”.Sarıtaş Davut, Özcan Hasan & Adúriz-Bravo Agustín - 2023 - Stem Education Review 1:1-15.
    The value of science partly lies on the development of useful products for humanity’s needs, but basic sciences cannot be said the “protagonists” of their obtention. Human history shows that these processes occur as a result of interactions between science and technology, mathematics, and engineering, as well as ethics and aesthetics. This network of disciplinary relationships facilitating the impact of scientific knowledge on human lives is at the center of discussions in the field of Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  23. The Organic Roots of Conatus in Early Greek Thought.Christopher Kirby - 2021 - Conatus 6 (2).
    The focus of this paper will be on the earliest Greek treatments of impulse, motivation, and self-animation – a cluster of concepts tied to the hormē-conatus concept. I hope to offer a plausible account of how the earliest recorded views on this subject in mythological, pre-Socratic, and Classical writings might have inspired later philosophical developments by establishing the foundations for an organic, wholly naturalized approach to human inquiry. Three pillars of that approach which I wish to emphasize are: (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  24. The development of dialectic and argumentation theory in post-classical Islamic intellectual history.Mehmet Karabela - 2011 - Dissertation, Mcgill University
    This dissertation is an analysis of the development of dialectic and argumentation theory in post-classical Islamic intellectual history. The central concerns of the thesis are; treatises on the theoretical understanding of the concept of dialectic and argumentation theory, and how, in practice, the concept of dialectic, as expressed in the Greek classical tradition, was received and used by five communities in the Islamic intellectual camp. It shows how dialectic as an argumentative discourse diffused into five communities (theologicians, (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  25. Recentring Africa in the Study of Ancient Philosophy: The Legacy of Ancient Egyptian Philosophy.Nicholas Chukwudike Anakwue - 2023 - In Mathura Umachandran & Marchella Ward (eds.), Critical Ancient World Studies: The Case for Forgetting Classics. Routledge. pp. 63-76.
    Ancient philosophy has, for the most part, focused particularly around the history and philosophies of the Pre-Socratics, Socrates, Plato and Aristotle, with broader representations of some other non-Greek philosophical traditions such as the Chinese, Indian and Iranian philosophies. However, a distinctive Eurocentric bias towards ancient Egypt, to which many ancient Greek philosophers looked to as the cradle of wisdom and philosophy, has blatantly disregarded the poignant place of African philosophy in the pedagogy of ancient (...). Thus, this paper argues for re-centering ancient Egyptian philosophy, and by extension, African philosophy in the study of ancient philosophy. The paper, firstly, traces the historical originality and rich elements of philosophy that ancient Egypt possesses, and then, identifies how these served as the theoretical springboard for the emergence of Greek philosophy. Any comprehensive study of ancient philosophy should not deliberately exclude this important aspect of development in philosophical thought. The paper, therefore, concludes with recommendations on repositioning African philosophy within the pedagogical context of ancient philosophy. (shrink)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  26. Corrupting the youth: a history of philosophy in Australia.James Franklin - 2003 - Sydney, Australia: Macleay Press.
    A polemical account of Australian philosophy up to 2003, emphasising its unique aspects (such as commitment to realism) and the connections between philosophers' views and their lives. Topics include early idealism, the dominance of John Anderson in Sydney, the Orr case, Catholic scholasticism, Melbourne Wittgensteinianism, philosophy of science, the Sydney disturbances of the 1970s, Francofeminism, environmental philosophy, the philosophy of law and Mabo, ethics and Peter Singer. Realist theories especially praised are David Armstrong's on universals, David (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   32 citations  
  27. Feminizing the City: Plato on Women, Masculinity, and Thumos.Kirsty Ironside & Joshua Wilburn - 2024 - Hypatia:1-24.
    This paper responds to two trends in debates about Plato's view of women in the Republic. First, many scholars argue or assume that Plato seeks to minimize the influence of femininity in the ideal city, and to make guardian women themselves as “masculine” as possible. Second, scholars who address the relationship between Plato's views of women and his psychological theory tend to focus on the reasoning and appetitive parts of the tripartite soul. In response to the first point, we argue (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  28. Who Mourns for Adonais? Or, Where Have All the Gods Gone?Necip Fikri Alican - 2018 - Analysis and Metaphysics 17:38–94.
    Belief in God is a steady epistemic state sustaining an ancient social institution. Not only is it still with us, it is still the same as it ever was. It rests on the same inspiration it did thousands of years ago, commanding the same attention with the same motivation. Deities come and go but the belief stays the same. That is the thesis of this paper. It is more specifically a study of classical Greek polytheism as a paradigm (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  29.  10
    Xenophon.Carol Atack - 2024 - Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
    Introduction to Xenophon's work and overview of his philosophy. _Greece and Rome_ New Surveys in the Classics Vol 48.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  30. Relativistic Language and the Natural Philosophy Big-Bang.Heitor Matallo Junior - manuscript
    This article aims to show the emergence of Pre-Socratic Natural Philosophy using the cosmological Big-Bang analogy, where from a certain moment in time and space a universe appears, first in its "inflationary" moment and, soon, in constant expansion. In the case of natural philosophy, it arose with Thales at a certain moment in space and time. It also had its “inflationary” period marked by a large number of philoso-phers and a profound change in the understanding of nature. This (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  31. Lucretius’ On the Nature of Things.Irfan Ajvazi - manuscript
    Lucretius On the Nature of Things draws heavily on Epicurus’s ideas, translating them from Greek into Latin and putting them into his own poetic voice. It is therefore the best source we have for the ideas of [classical Epicurean philosophy]. The atomic model is not more than a representational model of the physical universe up to a certain level of magnification. Modern science dives much deeper than atoms and ends up with no matter at all.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  32. Scholia in scholia: su una nuova edizione di Hermias di Alessandria.Domenico Cufalo - 2017 - Exemplaria Classica. Journal of Classical Philology 21:227–242.
    Review of Carlo M. Lucarini et Claudio Moreschini, Hermias Alexandrinus, In Platonis Phaedrum scholia, Berlin – Boston: De Gruyter, 2012, lxiv+293 pp., ISBN 978-3-11-020115-4.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  33. Myth, Music, and Science: Teaching the Philosophy of Science through the Use of Non-Scientific Examples.Edward Slowik - 2003 - Science & Education 12 (3):289-302.
    This essay explores the benefits of utilizing non-scientific examples and analogies in teaching philosophy of science courses. These examples can help resolve two basic difficulties faced by most instructors, especially when teaching lower-level courses: first, they can prompt students to take an active interest in the class material, since the examples will involve aspects of the culture well-known, or at least more interesting, to the students; and second, these familiar, less-threatening examples will lessen the students' collective anxieties and open (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  34. The end of the Western Civilization? The Intellectual Journey of Humanity to Adulthood.Hippokratis Kiaris - 2023 - Wilmington, DE: Vernon Press.
    Civilizations can be perceived as living human beings that are born, mature, age, and ultimately die and disappear, passing their legacy to the future generations. These transitions may be projected to the different stages of cognitive development of children. The Western Civilization, which embodies our current state of cultural advancement from the Classic Greek to the modern period, can be paralleled by the gradual transitions of human beings toward adulthood. From this perspective, the ancient Greek era resembles the (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  35. An Interpersonal-Epistemic Account of Intellectual Autonomy: Questioning, Responsibility, and Vulnerability.Kunimasa Sato - 2018 - Tetsugaku: International Journal of the Philosophical Association of Japan 2:65-82.
    The nature and value of autonomy has long been debated in diverse philosophical traditions, including moral and political philosophy. Although the notion dates back to ancient Greek philosophy, it was during the Age of Enlightenment that autonomy drew much attention. Thus, as may be known, moral philosophers tended to emphasize self-regulation, particularly one’s own will to abide by universal moral laws, as the term “autonomy” originates from the Greek words “self” (auto) and “rule” (nomos). In parallel, (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  36. Al-Kindi and Nietzsche on the Stoic Art of Banishing Sorrow.Peter S. Groff - 2004 - Journal of Nietzsche Studies 28 (1):139-173.
    This comparative examination of Nietzsche and the Islamic philosopher al-Kindi emphasizes their mutual commitment to the recovery of classical Greek and Hellenistic thought and the idea of philosophy as a way of life. Affiliating both thinkers with the Stoic lineage in particular, I examine the ways in which they appropriate common themes such as fatalism, self-cultivation via spiritual exercises, and the banishing of sorrow. Focusing primarily on their respective conceptions of self and nature, I argue that the (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  37. Leaving the Garden: Al-Rāzī and Nietzsche as Wayward Epicureans.Peter S. Groff - 2014 - Philosophy East and West 64 (4):983-1017.
    This paper initiates a dialogue between classical Islamic philosophy and late modern European thought, by focusing on two peripheral, ‘heretical’ figures within these traditions: Abū Bakr Muḥammad ibn Zakariyāʾ al-Rāzī and Friedrich Nietzsche. What affiliates these thinkers across the cultural and historical chasm that separates them is their mutual fascination with, and profound indebtedness to, ancient Greek and Hellenistic philosophy. Given the specific themes, concerns and doctrines that they appropriate from this common source, I argue that (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  38. Nietzsche and the Falāsifa.Peter S. Groff - 2020 - In Marco Brusotti, Michael J. McNeal, Corinna Schubert & Herman Siemens (eds.), European/Supra-European: Cultural Encounters in Nietzsche's Philosophy. Boston: De Gruyter. pp. 333-348.
    The last twenty-five years or so have seen the emergence of exciting comparative work on Nietzsche and various philosophical traditions beyond the bounds of Europe. So far, however, the emphasis has been primarily on the cultures of India, China and Japan, with an almost exclusive focus on Buddhist, Hindu, Daoist, and Confucian traditions. Surprisingly, little work has been done on Nietzsche and the Islamic tradition. In this paper, I sketch out Nietzsche’s understanding of Islam, the ways in which he uses (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  39. Caos e ordine: genesi e sviluppo dello stile deduttivo nell’Antica Grecia.Luca Sciortino - 2021 - Informazione Filosofica 3 (2):6-24.
    ABSTRACT (ENG) One of the concerns of Greek philosophy centred on the question of how a manifold and ordered universe arose out of the primitive state of things. From the mythical accounts dating around the seventh century B.C. to the cosmologies of the Classical period in Ancient Greece, many theories have been proposed in order to answer to this question. How these theories differ in positing a “something” that pre-existed the ordered cosmos has been widely discussed. However, (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  40. New Readings in Philosophical Issues.Abduljaleel Alwali - 2011 - Cairo, Cairo Governorate, Egypt: Dar Al-Anglo.
    Classically, most philosophers asked philosophical questions without answering them. In this book, the author follows Bertrand Russel’s approach in his book The Problems of Philosophy , by offering possible answers to philosophical questions. The book consists eight chapters that aim to offer answers to eight questions, namely: Sources of Islamic Civilization, Achievements of Muslim Philosophers, Falsification of the Sudden Light, Aristotle’s Categories, Zaki Nageeb’s Criticism of Greek Philosophy, The Natural Terms, Comparative Study between Avicenna and Al-Ghazzali, Despotism (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  41. Is the Achievement of Moral Character the Ultimate Goal of Higher Education?Lee Jeong-Kyu - 2022 - Eric.
    This article is to explore whether the achievement of moral character is the ultimate goal of higher education from a cross cultural approach. To discuss this study logically, three major research questions are addressed. First, what are the concepts of moral, ethics, and character? Second, what is the achievement of moral character from the Eastern and the Western perspectives? Third, what is the role of higher education for the achievement of moral character? To defend these research questions, the author uses (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  42. Abordaje Académico de la Lógica en la India, las escuelas Nyaya-Vaisesica contra el nihilismo budista.Alexander Valdenegro - 2010 - Dissertation, Universidad de la República
    "In the programs of Logic and History of Philosophy in the FHUCE study and introduction to logic is always done on the basis of Western classical Greek tradition, and its development is still exclusively through Western culture. This presentation aims to provide a path parallel to the West is the tradition of Nyaya-Vaisesika schools, which arise in the S. V B.C. like a response to the anti-Vedic Buddhist nihilism, and reached an important technical development at the beginning (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  43. Zeno’s Paradoxes. A Cardinal Problem. I. On Zenonian Plurality.Karin Verelst - 2005 - The Baltic International Yearbook of Cognition, Logic and Communication 1.
    It will be shown in this article that an ontological approach for some problems related to the interpretation of Quantum Mechanics (QM) could emerge from a re-evaluation of the main paradox of early Greek thought: the paradox of Being and non-Being, and the solutions presented to it by Plato and Aristotle. More well known are the derivative paradoxes of Zeno: the paradox of motion and the paradox of the One and the Many. They stem from what was perceived by (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  44. Starting from the Muses: Engaging Moral Imagination through Memory’s Many Gifts.Guy Axtell - 2021 - In Brian Robinson (ed.), The Moral Psychology of Amusement. Lanham, Maryland: Moral Psychology of the Emotio.
    In Greek mythology the Muses –patron goddesses of fine arts, history, humanities, and sciences– are tellingly portrayed as the daughters of Zeus and Mnemosyne, the goddess Memory, who is of the race of Titans, older still than Zeus and other Olympian deities. The relationship between memory and such fields as epic poetry, history, music and dance is easily recognizable to moderns. But bards/poets like Homer and Hesiod, who began oral storytelling by “invoking the Muses” with their audience, knew well (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  45. Reading nature through culture in Plato and Aristotle's works on law.Kirk W. Junker - 1999 - Phronimon - Journal of the South African Society of Greek Philosophy and the Humanities 7 (I):61-72.
    In the human and natural sciences there are many ways of examining nature. While archaeologists, anthropologists and other scientists prefer to examine nature empirically, philosophers and other humanists are more likely to examine texts in order to arrive at an idea of, for example, the Greek world's understanding of nature. Among the scholarly treatises that we typically consider to be sources for research into Greek philosophy of nature and the environment, I selected, for the purposes of this (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  46.  96
    Renaissance: Islamic or Italian Precedence?H. Matallo Junior - manuscript
    The paper seeks to show that the period between the years 756 and 1031, a period officially recognized as the domination of the Umayyad dynasty in the Iberian Peninsula, saw the emergence of the most important movement for the recovery of classical Greek works known, and offered the foundations for the second Renaissance, the Italian. It also shows that translation is a process that can fundamentally alter original works, as they depend on the translator's interpretation, as well as (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  47. Probems of Greek Philosophy.Mudasir Ahmad Tantray & Tariq Rafeeq Khan - 2021 - Bilaspur, Chhattisgarh 495001, India: Rudra Publications.
    This textbook has been written to discuss the fundamental problems of Greek Philosophy. There has been many philosophical Problems which Greek philosophers has discussed and examined with rational approach. The philosophical problems which we have mentioned in this book are: Greek Rationalism, Greek Naturalism, Greek Idealism, Greeks on human mind, Number theory and Greek Metaphysics. We have defined some significant issues like Greek atomism, Nihilism, Solipsism, Dogmatism, Sophism and Pluralism. Philosophy is (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  48. Review of Destrée and Giannopoulou, eds., Plato's Symposium: A Critical Guide. [REVIEW]Thornton Lockwood - 2018 - Classical Journal 10:03.
    Destrée and Giannopoulou have provided scholars with thirteen exegetically rich and philosophically sophisticated chapters on Plato’s Symposium, written for the most part by scholars with numerous publications (in several cases, numerous books) on Plato, classical Greek moral psychology, and ancient Greek philosophy. Many of the chapters warrant discussion at least to the length that I am allotted for my review of the entire volume, which alas I cannot provide here. Running through the volume is a commitment (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  49. Review of Jost and Shiner, eds. Eudaimonia and Well-Being. [REVIEW]Thornton Lockwood - 2004 - Bryn Mawr Classical Review 7:38.
    What is at stake in determining how to translate the central term of Greek ethical philosophy, that of eudaimonia? The volume Eudaimonia and Well-Being (a collection of ten papers presented at a conference at the University of Cincinnati in 1993) shows that English terms such as happiness, well-being, and flourishing can have significantly different connotations which complicate our understanding of the Greek term. The volume’s contributors work in both ancient Greek ethics and Anglophone contemporary moral (...), and although not all the papers bridged the divide between classics and philosophy, on the whole the volume succeeds in elucidating the different meanings “happiness” has for both contemporary and ancient Greek philosophers. The ten papers address five topics, in each case with one author presenting a thesis and another responding as discussant. Most of the papers were revised for publication, and many of the discussants’ papers can stand as independent contributions. Additionally, the editor (who was a participant at the conference) provides a helpful introduction which underscores key themes addressed by many of the papers. The topics examined were whether virtue is sufficient and necessary for happiness (Annas and Sumner); the relationship between fear of death and happiness in Epicurean philosophy (Mitsis and Lesses); the development of the concept of happiness amongst peripatoi in the Hellenistic Lyceum (White and Inwood); the nature of the ethical philosophizing in the sixth book of Polybius’ Histories (Hahm and Jost); and the neo-Aristotelian “capabilities” social philosophy espoused by Martha Nussbaum and Amartya Sen. The volume includes an index locurum, but no comprehensive bibliography. Let me first summarize the debate on the individual topics and then speak to a couple general themes. Given the richness of the papers, space constrains me to restate only the main arguments. (shrink)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  50. On the Blissful Islands with Nietzsche and Jung. [REVIEW]Peter Groff - 2019 - The Agonist : A Nietzsche Circle Journal 12 (2):53-59.
    The author of this unusual and fascinating monograph is an intellectual historian whose interests extend well beyond Nietzsche to encompass Weimar classicism, 20th century analytical psychology and classical Greek and Hellenistic philosophy. Although this may at first sound like a strange juxtaposition, Bishop’s previous studies have made a compelling case that vital aspects of Nietzsche’s thought come sharply into focus when he is read in relation to figures such as Goethe and Schiller on the one hand and (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
1 — 50 / 1000