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    Retributive Justice in the Breivik Case: Exploring the Rationale for Punitive Restraint in Response to the Worst Crimes.David Chelsom Vogt - 2024 - Retfaerd - Nordic Journal of Law and Justice 1:25-43.
    The article discusses retributive justice and punitive restraint in response to the worst types of crime. I take the Breivik Case as a starting point. Anders Behring Breivik was sentenced to 21 years of preventive detention for killing 69 people, mainly youths, at Utøya and 8 people in Oslo on July 22nd, 2011. Retributivist theories as well as commonly held retributive intuitions suggest that much harsher punishment is required for such crimes. According to some retributivist theories, most notably on the (...)
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  2. Med rett til å bli straffet: om Kant og Hegels teorier om straff som respekt for forbryteren.David Chelsom Vogt - 2016 - Norsk Filosofisk Tidsskrift 51 (3-4):148-162.
    English title: The Right to be Punished: On Kant and Hegel's theories of punishment as respect for the criminal -/- The article discusses Kant and Hegel's theories of punishment in light of their broader legal philosophies. The purpose of punishment, and law in general, is to secure mutual freedom and mutual recognition. Punishment is a way of expressing respect for the freedom of the criminal, as well as the freedom of victims and all members of society. Though it might seem (...)
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  3. The Aims of Restorative Justice.David Chelsom Vogt - 2012 - In Jørn Jacobsen and Linda Gröning (ed.), Restorative Justice and Criminal Law.
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  4. Kant og stemmeretten.David Chelsom Vogt - 2020 - Norsk Filosofisk Tidsskrift 55 (4):242-252.
    English title: Kant and the Right to Vote The article is a contribution to the ongoing debate in NFT about the moral responsibility of voters. Kristian Skagen Ekeli has argued that politically ignorant citizens have a duty to abstain from voting. He argues that such a duty fol- lows from Kant’s duty to respect other persons. I analyze Ekeli’s proposed duties by considering how they might fit into Kant’s system of duties. I conclude, contra Ekeli, that the Kantian duty to (...)
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