Results for 'Dora Schöls'

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  1. "Ein radikaler Wandel unseres Lebens" - Interview in der BZ zu Corona, Solidarität und Ausgangssperren.Karsten Schubert & Dora Schöls - 2020 - Badische Zeitung Plus.
    Wie ein Mantra wird es wiederholt: Abstand halten, damit das neuartige Coronavirus sich nicht so schnell verbreitet. Gleichzeitig entstehen vielerorts Nachbarschaftshilfen. Dora Schöls hat den Freiburger Politikwissenschaftler Karsten Schubert gefragt, ob die Gesellschaft nun auseinanderdriftet oder zusammenrückt.
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  2. Ein Radikaler Wandel Unseres Lebens - BZ-Interview MIT Dem Politikwissenschaftler Karsten Schubert Darüber, Wie Sich Die Folgen der Coronakrise Auf den Gesellschaftlichen Zusammenhalt Auswirken: Freiburger Politologe Im Interview.Karsten Schubert & Dora Schöls - 2020 - Badische Zeitung 3.
    Wie ein Mantra wird es wiederholt: Abstand halten, damit das neuartige Coronavirus sich nicht so schnell verbreitet. Gleichzeitig entstehen vielerorts Nachbarschaftshilfen. Dora Schöls hat den Freiburger Politikwissenschaftler Karsten Schubert gefragt, ob die Gesellschaft nun auseinanderdriftet oder zusammenrückt.
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  3. Iris Murdoch’s The Bell: Tragedy, Love, and Religion.Kenneth Masong - 2008 - Kritike 2 (1):11-30.
    The novel begins as follows:"Dora Greenfield left her husband because she was afraid of him. She decided six months later to return to him for the same reason. The absent Paul, haunting her with letters and telephone bells and imagined footsteps on the stairs had begun to be the greater torment. Dora suffered from guilt, and with guilt came fear. She decided at last that the persecution of his presence was to be preferred to the persecution of his (...)
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  4. "Bertrand Russell 1921-1970: The Ghost of Madness" by Ray Monk. [REVIEW]Tim Crane - 2000 - The Economist 1.
    ‘Poor Bertie’ Beatrice Webb wrote after receiving a visit from Bertrand Russell in 1931, ‘he has made a mess of his life and he knows it’. In the 1931 version of his Autobiography, Russell himself seemed to share Webb’s estimate of his achievements. Emotionally, intellectually and politically, he wrote, his life had been a failure. This sense of failure pervades the second volume of Ray Monk’s engrossing and insightful biography. At its heart is the failure of Russell’s marriages to (...) Black and Patricia (Peter) Spence, his poor relationships with his children John and Kate, and the decline in his reputation as a philosopher. Russell, who had changed the direction of philosophy irrevocably, was in later years unable to find permanent academic employment in Britain, ousted from his professorship at the City College of New York because of his views on sex and marriage, and was reduced to giving nonspecialist lectures at a foundation established by the Philadelphia philanthropist Albert C. Barnes. Eventually in 1944 he returned to Cambridge, but by then the philosophical world was in the grip of Ludwig Wittgenstein’s ideas, and Russell was largely ignored. (shrink)
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