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Giuseppina D'Oro
Keele University
  1. Imagination and Revision.Giuseppina D'Oro & Jonas Ahlskog - 2021 - In C. M. van den Akker (ed.), The Routledge Companion to History and Theory. Routledge. pp. 215-232.
    In this contribution we explore revisionists and anti-revisionists conceptions of the historical imagination. The focus will be on how these conceptions of the historical imagination determine how one ought to answer the question of whether or not it is in principle possible to know the past in its own terms rather than from the perspective of the present. The contrast that we are seeking to draw is that between a conception of the historical imagination which is revisionist in the sense (...)
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    To reply or not to reply, that is the question: descriptive metaphysics and the sceptical challenge.Giuseppina D'Oro - 2023 - In Benjamin De Mesel and Sybren Heyndels Audun Bengtson (ed.), P.F. Strawson and His Philosophical Legacy. Oxford University Press. pp. 192-211.
    How should one respond to scepticism? Should one seek to refute it? Or should scepticism be ignored? This paper argues that descriptive metaphysics occupies an intermediate logical space between truth-directed transcendental arguments aimed at refuting the sceptic and the quietist stance of the Humean naturalist who declines to take up the sceptical challenge. Descriptive metaphysics is neither quietist nor confrontational. It seeks to show, rather, that the sceptic is not a genuine partner in conversation.
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  3. The leopard does not change its spots: naturalism and the argument against methodological pluralism in the sciences.Jonas Ahlskog & Giuseppina D'Oro - 2022 - In Adam Tuboli & Ákos Sivadó (eds.), The History of Understanding in Analytic Philosophy: Before and After Logical Empiricism. Bloomsbury. pp. 185-208.
    This paper sets out to undermine the view that a commitment to the early modern conception of the mind as immortalized in Ryle’s metaphor of the (Cartesian) ghost in the machine and in Quine’s metaphor of the (Lockean) myth of the museum is required to articulate a defence of the sui generis character of humanistic explanations. These powerful metaphors have not only contributed to undermining the claim for methodological pluralism by caricaturizing the arguments for disunity in the sciences; they have (...)
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  4. In defence of a humanistically oriented historiography: the nature/culture distinction at the time of the Anthropocene.Giuseppina D'Oro - 2020 - In Jouni Matt-Kuukkanen (ed.), Philosophy of History: Twenty-First-Century Perspectives. Bloomsbury. Bloomsbury. pp. 216-236.
    “Do Anthropocene narratives confuse an important distinction between the natural and the historical past?” asks Giuseppina D’Oro. D’Oro defends the view that the concept of the historical past is sui generis and distinct from that of the geological past against a new, Anthropocene-inspired challenge to the possibility of a humanistically oriented historiography. She argues that the historical past is not a short segment of geological time, the time of the human species on Earth, but the past investigated from the perspective (...)
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  5. Human History in the Age of the Anthropocene: A Defence of the Nature/Culture Distinction.Giuseppina D'Oro - 2021 - Iai News.
    A legacy of Enlightenment thought was to see the human as separate from nature. Human history was neatly distinguished from natural history. The age of Anthropocene has now put all that into question. This human exceptionalism is seen by some as responsible for the devastating impact humans have had on the planet. But if we give up on the nature / culture distinction and see human activity as just another type of natural process, we risk losing our ability to attribute (...)
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  6. How to (and not to) Defend the Manifest Image.Giuseppina D'Oro - 2019 - In Paul Giladi (ed.), Responses to Naturalism: From Idealism and Pragmatism. Routledge. pp. 144-164.
    Claims such as ‘there are no tables and chairs’ have become increasingly common in the philosophical context, and eliminativism is now a fairly well-established position in contemporary debates in analytic metaphysics. This outbreak of eliminativism has prompted a number of responses aimed at saving the manifest image of reality. Prominent amongst the attempts to save the manifest image is a view, powerfully articulated by Frank Jackson in From Metaphysics to Ethics , according to which the manifest properties of objects, properties (...)
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  7. Why Collingwood Matters: A Defence of Humanistic Understanding.Giuseppina D'Oro - 2023 - Bloomsbury.
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