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Joshua Cockayne
University of St. Andrews
  1. Shattered Faith: The Social Epistemology of Deconversion by Spiritually Violent Religious Trauma.David Efird, Joshua Cockayne & Jack Warman - 2020 - In Michelle Panchuk & Michael C. Rea (eds.), Voices from the Edge: Centering Marginalized Perspectives in Analytic Theology.
    In this chapter, we argue that it’s possible to lose your faith in God by the actions of other people. In particular, we argue that spiritually violent religious trauma, where religious texts are used to shame a person into thinking themselves unworthy of God’s love, can cause a person to stop engaging in activities that sustain their faith in God, such as engaging in the worship of God. To do this, we provide an analysis of faith, worship, and love on (...)
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  2. The Will Not to Believe.Joshua Cockayne & Jack Warman - 2019 - Sophia 58 (3):511-523.
    Is it permissible to believe that God does not exist if the evidence is inconclusive? In this paper, we give a new argument in support of atheistic belief modelled on William James’s The Will to Believe. According to James, if the evidence for a proposition, p, is ambiguous, and believing that p is a genuine option, then it can be permissible to let your passions decide. Typically, James’s argument has been used as a defence of passionally caused theistic belief. However, (...)
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  3. Experiencing the Real Presence of Christ in the Eucharist.Joshua Cockayne, David Efird, Gordon Haynes, Daniel Molto, Richard Tamburro, Jack Warman & August Ludwigs - 2017 - Journal of Analytic Theology 5:175-196.
    We present a new understanding of Christ’s real presence in the Eucharist on the model of Stump’s account of God’s omnipresence and Green and Quan’s account of experiencing God in Scripture. On this understanding, Christ is derivatively, rather than fundamentally, located in the consecrated bread and wine, such that Christ is present to the believer through the consecrated bread and wine, thereby making available to the believer a second-person experience of Christ, where the consecrated bread and wine are the way (...)
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  4.  38
    We Believe: Group Belief and the Liturgical Use of Creeds.Joshua Cockayne - 2021 - European Journal for Philosophy of Religion 13 (3).
    The recitation of creeds in corporate worship is widespread in the Christian tradition. Intuitively, the use of creeds captures the belief not only of the individuals reciting it, but of the Church as a whole. This paper seeks to provide a philosophical analysis of the meaning of the words, ‘We believe…’, in the context of the liturgical recitation of the Creed. Drawing from recent work in group ontology, I explore three recent accounts of group belief and consider the potential of (...)
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