Order:
See also
Nicola Polloni
Humboldt-University, Berlin
Nicola Polloni
Durham University
  1.  46
    Gundissalinus’s Application of Al-Farabi’s Metaphysical Programme. A Case of Epistemological Transfer.Nicola Polloni - 2016 - Mediterranea 1:69-106.
    This study deals with Dominicus Gundissalinus’s discussion on metaphysics as philosophical discipline. Gundissalinus’s translation and re-elaboration of al-Fārābī’s Iḥṣā’ al-ʿulūm furnish him, in the De scientiis, a specific and detailed procedure for metaphysical analysis articulated in two different stages, an ascending and a descending one. This very same procedure is presented by Gundissalinus also in his De divisione philosophiae, where the increased number of sources –in particular, Avicenna– does not prevent Gundissalinus to quote the entire passage on the methods of (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2.  15
    Gundissalinus on the Angelic Creation of the Human Soul: A Peculiar Example of Philosophical Appropriation.Nicola Polloni - 2019 - Oriens 47 (3-4):313–347.
    With his original reflection—deeply influenced by many important Arabic thinkers—Gundissalinus wanted to renovate the Latin debate concerning crucial aspects of the philosophical tradition. Among the innovative doctrines he elaborated, one appears to be particularly problematic, for it touches a very delicate point of Christian theology: the divine creation of the human soul, and thus, the most intimate bond connecting the human being and his Creator. Notwithstanding the relevance of this point, Gundissalinus ascribed the creation of the human soul to the (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3.  13
    Gundissalinus and Avicenna: Some Remarks on an Intricate Philosophical Connection.Nicola Polloni - 2017 - Documenti E Studi Sulla Tradizione Filosofica Medievale 28:515-552.
    This article analyses the peculiarities of Dominicus Gundissalinus’s reading and use of Avicenna’s writings in his original works. Gundissalinus (1120ca – post 1190) is the Latin translator of Avicenna’s De anima and Liber de philosophia prima, but also an original philosopher whose writings are precious witnesses of the very first reception of Avicennian philosophy in the Latin West. The article points out the structural bond with the Persian philosopher upon which Gundissalinus grounds his own speculation. This contribution stresses, in particular, (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark