Results for 'Nishida Kitar��'

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  1.  21
    Nishida and Merleau-Ponty: Art, “Depth,” and “Seeing Without a Seer”.Adam Loughnane - 2016 - European Journal of Japanese Philosophy 1:47-74.
    This paper sets Maurice Merleau-Ponty and Nishida Kitarō in dialogue and explore the interpretations of artistic expression, which inform their similar phenomenological accounts of perception. I discuss how both philosophers look to artistic practice to reveal multi-perspectival aspects of vision. They do so, I argue, by going beyond a “positivist” representational under-standing of perception and by including negative aspects of visual experience as constitutive of vision. Following this account, I interpret artworks by Cézanne, Guo Xi, Rodin, and Hasegawa according (...)
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  2. Thinking in Transition: Nishida Kitaro and Martin Heidegger.Elmar Weinmayr, tr Krummel, John W. M. & Douglas Ltr Berger - 2005 - Philosophy East and West 55 (2):232-256.
    : Two major philosophers of the twentieth century, the German existential phenomenologist Martin Heidegger and the seminal Japanese Kyoto School philosopher Nishida Kitarō are examined here in an attempt to discern to what extent their ideas may converge. Both are viewed as expressing, each through the lens of his own tradition, a world in transition with the rise of modernity in the West and its subsequent globalization. The popularity of Heidegger's thought among Japanese philosophers, despite its own admitted limitation (...)
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  3. Nishida, Agency, and the 'Self-Contradictory' Body.Joel W. Krueger - 2008 - Asian Philosophy 18 (3):213 – 229.
    In this essay, I investigate Kitarō Nishida's characterization of what he refers to as the 'self-contradictory' body. First, I clarify the conceptual relation between the self-contradictory body and Nishida's notion of 'acting-intuition'. I next look at Nishida's analysis of acting-intuition and the self-contradictory body as it pertains to our personal, sensorimotor engagement with the world and things in it, as well as to our bodily immersion within the intersubjective and social world. Along the way, I argue that (...)
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  4. The Unsolved Issue of Consciousness.Nishida Kitarō & John W. M. Krummel - 2012 - Philosophy East and West 62 (1):44-51.
    This essay by Nishida Kitarō from 1927, translated into English here for the first time, is from the initial period of what has come to be called “Nishida philosophy” (Nishida tetsugaku), when Nishida was first developing his conception of “place” (basho). Nishida here inquires into the relationship between logic and consciousness in terms of place and implacement in order to overcome the shortcomings of previous philosophical attempts—from the ancient Greeks to the moderns—to dualistically conceive the (...)
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  5.  85
    The Idea of the Mirror in Dōgen and Nishida.Michel Dalissier - 2006 - In James W. Heisig (ed.), Frontiers of Japanese Philosophy Vol.1. Nagoya: Nanzan Institute for Religion & Culture. pp. 99-142.
    The image of the “mirror” (鏡kagami) appears frequently in the philosophical texts of Nishida Kitaro (西田幾多郎1870-1945), where it assumes various functions. Mirror references first occur in meditations on the philosophies of Josiah Royce (1855-1916) and Henri Bergson (1859-1941). The most fascinating evocation here corresponds to the idea of a “self-enlightening mirror”, used to probe the philosophical ground for self-illumination. This idea seems to point back to Buddhist meaning that intervenes in Japanese intellectual history. We take this as our warrant (...)
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  6. World, Nothing, and Globalization in Nishida and Nancy.John Krummel - 2014 - In Leah Kalmanson James Mark Shields (ed.), Buddhist Responses to Globalization. pp. 107-129.
    The “shrinking” of the globe in the last few centuries has made explicit that the world is a tense unity of many: the many worlds are forced to contend with one another. Nishida Kitarō, the founder of the Kyoto school, once stated that to be is to be implaced. We exist by partaking in “the socio-historical world.” More recently, Jean-luc Nancy has conceived of the world in terms of sense. What is striking in both is that the world emerges (...)
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  7. William James and Kitaro Nishida on “Pure Experience”, Consciousness, and Moral Psychology.Joel Krueger - 2007 - Dissertation, Purdue University
    The question “What is the nature of experience?” is of perennial philosophical concern. It deals not only with the nature of experience qua experience, but additionally with related questions about the experiencing subject and that which is experienced. In other words, to speak of the philosophical problem of experience, one must also address questions about mind, world, and the various relations that link them together. Both William James and Kitarō Nishida were deeply concerned with these issues. Their shared notion (...)
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  8.  71
    Nishida Kitarō: “Der Geschichtliche Leib”.Leon Krings - 2016 - European Journal of Japanese Philosophy 1:217-246.
    Original title : 「歴史的身体」『西田幾多郎全集』[Nishida Kitarō Gesamtausgabe], 3. Auflage, Tokyo, Iwanami Shoten, Bd. 14: 265–92.
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  9. Nishida Kitarō’s Kōiteki Chokkan: Active Intuition and Contemporary Metaethics.Laura Specker Sullivan - forthcoming - In Colin Marshall (ed.), Comparative Metaethics: Neglected Perspectives on the Foundations of Morality. Routledge.
    I characterize Nishida Kitarō’s metaethical perspective throughout his work but focus especially on his later papers, most notably his writings on kōiteki chokkan, or active intuition. These include Kōiteki Chokkan no Tachiba (published in 1935), Kōiteki Chokkan (published in 1937), as well as Nothingness and the Religious Worldview (Bashoteki Ronri to Shūkyōteki Sekaikan, published in 1945, and widely available in translation). I explore affinities between Nishida’s approach to ethics and metaethical intuitionism and sensibility theory. I then use this (...)
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  10. Anontology and the Issue of Being and Nothing in Nishida Kitarō.John Krummel - 2014 - In JeeLoo Liu Douglas L. Berger (ed.), Nothingness in Asian Philosophy. pp. 263-283.
    This chapter will explicate what Nishida means by “nothing” (mu, 無), as well as “being” (yū, 有), through an exposition of his concept of the “place of nothing” (mu no basho). We do so through an investigation of his exposition of “the place of nothing” vis-àvis the self, the world, and God, as it shows up in his epistemology, metaphysics, theology and religious ethics during the various periods of his oeuvre – in other words, his understanding of nothingness that (...)
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  11. The Originary Wherein: Heidegger and Nishida on the Sacred and the Religious.John W. M. Krummel - 2010 - Research in Phenomenology 40 (3):378-407.
    In this paper, I explore a possible convergence between two great twentieth century thinkers, Nishida Kitarō of Japan and Martin Heidegger of Germany. The focus is on the quasi-religious language they employ in discussing the grounding of human existence in terms of an encompassing Wherein for our being. Heidegger speaks of “the sacred” and “the passing of the last god” that mark an empty clearing wherein all metaphysical absolutes or gods have withdrawn but are simultaneously indicative of an opening (...)
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  12.  12
    Lieu de Médiation: Nishida, Tanabe, Simondon.Akinobu Kuroda - 2017 - European Journal of Japanese Philosophy 2:209-228.
    Nous nous proposons dans cette intervention de structurer synchroniquement trois moments philosophiques d’origines differentes : l’intuition agissante chez Kitarō Nishida, la dialectique de la mediation absolue chez Hajime Tanabe et la philosophie de l’individuation chez Gilbert Simondon, dans un contexte de reflexion philosophique sur la nature de la vie humaine. Les trois moments semblent susceptibles de se croiser, se critiquer et se completer dans un terrain transductif au sens ou l’entend Simondon. C’est ce nouveau terrain que nous entendons defricher (...)
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  13. The Unsolved Issue of ConsciousnessThe Unsolved Issue of Consciousness.Nishida Kitarō & John W. M. Krummel - 2012 - Philosophy East and West 62 (1).
    The following essay, “The Unsolved Issue of Consciousness” (Torinokosaretaru ishiki no mondai 取残されたる意識の問題), by Nishida Kitarō 西田幾多郎 from 1927 is significant in regard to the development of what has come to be called “Nishida philosophy” (Nishida tetsugaku 西田哲学). In what follows, in addition to providing some commentary on the important points of his essay, I would like to show its relevance or significance not only for those who would like to study Nishida’s thought but also for (...)
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  14.  80
    Anselms Proslogion, “nichts” gegen Nishida und Heidegger.Manfred Gawlina - 2013 - Argument: Biannual Philosophical Journal 3 (2):285-300.
    Co jest większe, bycie czy nic? Anzelm dowodzi istnienia Boga przy pomocy nihil. Bóg jako to, od czego nic większego nie może zostać pomyślane przez skończony umysł. Właściwe dla Anzelma logiczne – i być może mistyczne – użycie słowa „nic” domaga się porównania z negatywną ontologią Heideggera i jej recepcją w ramach tzw. Szkoły z Kioto założonej przez Nishidę. Czyż jednak pustka buddyzmu zen nie odsyła nas do – niewypowiedzianej – boskiej obecności?
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  15.  16
    The Dialectic of Hegel and Nishida: How to Deal with Modernity.Harumi Ōsaki - 2017 - European Journal of Japanese Philosophy 2:85-112.
    This essay discerns in Nishida’s later work lines of thought that could constitute a project of overcoming modernity, and explores its potentials and problems. My guiding thread is a comparison between Nishida’s philosophy and that of Hegel, who, according to Habermas, first developed a clear concept of modernity through his idea of dialectic. Nishida perceived the Hegelian dialectic as conceptually endorsing Western colonialism, one of the ill effects of modernity. I argue Nishida’s philosophy, which puts forward (...)
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  16. The Varieties of Pure Experience: William James and Kitaro Nishida on Consciousness and Embodiment.Joel Krueger - 2006 - William James Studies 1.
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  17.  86
    Relocating the Figure of Jikaku (Self-Consciousness) in Nishida’s Intuition and Reflection in Self-Consciousness (1917).Montserrat Crespin Perales - 2012 - In Toru Arakawa (ed.), Practicing Japanese Philosophy. Mind and Activity. Tokio, Japón: pp. 34-57.
    Relocating the figure of Jikaku (Self-Consciousness) in Nishida’s Intuition and Reflection in Self-consciousness.
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  18.  13
    HEIDEGGER E KITARÔ NISHIDA: o nada pensado através do intercâmbio entre ocidente e oriente.Maria Isabel do Couto Soares - 2020 - Dissertation, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco
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  19.  42
    Die Individuelle Selbsterschaffung der Geschichtlichen Welt Und der Staat: “Staat” Und “Volk” in der Philosophie Nishida Kitarōs.Yūjin Itabashi & Leon Krings - 2016 - European Journal of Japanese Philosophy 1:75-106.
    Originally published as「歴史的世界の個性的な自己創造と国家:西田哲学における〈国家〉と〈民族〉」, in「西田哲学会年報第七号」[ Jahrbuch der Nishida-Gesellschaft] 7 : 55–76. Übersetzt von Leon Krings. In diesem Aufsatz wird der Frage nachgegangen, in welcher Weise der „Staat“ im späten Denken des Philosophen Nishida Kitarō thematisiert wird. Dies geschieht anhand der Staatstheorie Nishidas, wie sie sich in seinen Aufsätzen Das Problem der Staatsraison und Das Problem der japanischen Kultur sowie im Anhang zur Philosophischen Aufsatzsammlung iv darstellt. Zusätzlich werden Nishidas Schriften, die nach den Grundproblemen der Philosophie geschrieben wurden und den (...)
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  20.  51
    Los deseos del yo. Un acercamiento a la teoría ética de Nishida Kitarô.Montserrat Crespin Perales - 2010 - EuskadiaAsia.
    Conferencia Festival Internacional de Japón (Bilbao, Noviembre de 2010) .
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  21.  17
    Logik der Grenze: Räume des Übergehens im Anschluss an Nishida Kitarō.Francesca Greco & Leon Krings - 2021 - In Leon Krings, Francesca Greco & Yukiko Kuwayama (eds.), Transitions: Crossing Boundaries in Japanese Philosophy. Chisokudō. pp. 122-172.
    The aim of this paper is to investigate Nishida Kitarō’s way of philosophizing in the light of the concept of “transition” in order to deepen our understanding of both Nishida’s philosophy and our thinking about and in transitions, using the concept of “boundary” or “border” (Grenze) as a catalyst. For that purpose, we focus on Nishida’s essay “Place” (「場所」), passing through different parts of the text as if through successive gates on a path of transition between one (...)
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  22. The "Place of Nothing" in Nishida as Chiasma and Chōra.John Krummel - 2015 - Diaphany 1 (1):203-240.
    The paper will explicate the Sache or matter of the dialectic of the founder of Kyoto School philosophy, Nishida Kitarō (1870-1945), from the standpoint of his mature thought, especially from the 1930s and 40s. Rather than providing a simple exposition of his thought I will engage in a creative reading of his concept of basho (place) in terms of chiasma and chōra, or a chiasmatic chōra. I argue that Nishida’s appropriation of nineteenth century German, especially Hegelian, terminology was (...)
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  23.  14
    Über die Philosophie des Lebens, Nishida Kitarō 西田幾多郎.Ralf Müller - 2017 - European Journal of Japanese Philosophy 2:295-315.
    Original title: 「生の哲學について」『西田幾多郎全集』旧版 [Alte Ausgabe: Gesammelte Werke Nishida Kitarōs]. Tokyo, Iwanami Shoten, 1978, 6: 428–51; 新版 [Neue Ausgabe]. Tokyo, Iwanami Shoten, 2009, 5: 335–53.
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  24. Maraldo, John: "Japanese Philosophy in the Making 1: Crossing Paths with Nishida". [REVIEW]Leon Krings - 2019 - 西田哲学会年報 16:153-145.
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  25.  7
    Review of Much Ado About Nothingness: Essays on Nishida and Tanabe. [REVIEW]Gereon Kopf - 2016 - European Journal of Japanese Philosophy 1:371-374.
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  26.  85
    Takeuti's Proof Theory in the Context of the Kyoto School.Andrew Arana - 2019 - Jahrbuch Für Philosophie Das Tetsugaku-Ronso 46:1-17.
    Gaisi Takeuti (1926–2017) is one of the most distinguished logicians in proof theory after Hilbert and Gentzen. He extensively extended Hilbert's program in the sense that he formulated Gentzen's sequent calculus, conjectured that cut-elimination holds for it (Takeuti's conjecture), and obtained several stunning results in the 1950–60s towards the solution of his conjecture. Though he has been known chiefly as a great mathematician, he wrote many papers in English and Japanese where he expressed his philosophical thoughts. In particular, he used (...)
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  27.  83
    Takeuti's well-ordering proofs revisited.Andrew Arana & Ryota Akiyoshi - 2021 - Mita Philosophy Society 3 (146):83-110.
    Gaisi Takeuti extended Gentzen's work to higher-order case in 1950's–1960's and proved the consistency of impredicative subsystems of analysis. He has been chiefly known as a successor of Hilbert's school, but we pointed out in the previous paper that Takeuti's aimed to investigate the relationships between "minds" by carrying out his proof-theoretic project rather than proving the "reliability" of such impredicative subsystems of analysis. Moreover, as briefly explained there, his philosophical ideas can be traced back to Nishida's philosophy in (...)
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  28. "The Logic of Place" and Common Sense.Yūjirō Nakamura & John Krummel - 2015 - Social Imaginaries 1 (1):71-82.
    The essay is a written version of a talk Nakamura Yūjirō gave at the Collège international de philosophie in Paris in 1983. In the talk Nakamura connects the issue of common sense in his own work to that of place in Nishida Kitarō and the creative imagination in Miki Kiyoshi. He presents this connection between the notions of common sense, imagination, and place as constituting one important thread in contemporary Japanese philosophy. He begins by discussing the significance of place (...)
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  29. Comparative Metaethics: Neglected Perspectives on the Foundations of Morality.Colin Marshall (ed.) - 2019 - Routledge.
    This collection of new essays focuses on metaethical views from outside the mainstream European tradition. The guiding motivation is that important discussions about the ultimate nature of morality can be found far beyond ancient Greece and modern Europe. The volume’s aim is to show how rich the possibilities are for comparative metaethics, and how much these comparisons can add to contemporary discussions of the foundations of morality. Representing five continents, the thinkers discussed range from ancient Egyptian, ancient Chinese, and the (...)
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  30. Absolute Present, Zen and Schrödinger’s One Mind.Brentyn Ramm & Peter Bruza - 2019 - In J. De Barros & Carlos Montemayor (eds.), Quanta and Mind: Essays on the Connection between Quantum Mechanics and Consciousness. Cham: Springer Verlag. pp. 189-200.
    Erwin Schrödinger holds a prominent place in the history of science primarily due to his crucial role in the development of quantum physics. What is perhaps lesser known are his insights into subject-object duality, consciousness and mind. He documented himself that these were influenced by the Upanishads, a collection of ancient Hindu spiritual texts. Central to his thoughts in this area is that Mind is only One and there is no separation between subject and object. This chapter aims to bridge (...)
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  31.  8
    Verso L’Estetica Del Luogo: Per Una Monadologia Polifonica.Masaru Yoneyama - 2016 - European Journal of Japanese Philosophy 1:203-217.
    This paper aims to develop Nishida Kitarō’s “logic of place” into an “aesthetics of place.” While brilliantly fusing the Buddhist traditions of Japan with Western philosophy, in his later years, Nishida came up with his own unique philosophy, a “monadology with the concept of substance.” This is a concept anchored in mu or “emptiness.” From this standpoint, how is the individual understood and how does society take shape? The answers to these questions are fundamental keys to understanding Japanese (...)
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  32. Ecological Imagination and Aims of Moral Education Through the Kyoto School and American Pragmatism.Steven Fesmire - 2012 - In Paul Standish & Naoko Saito (eds.), Education and the Kyoto School of Philosophy. Dordrecht, Netherlands: pp. 109-130.
    Cross-cultural dialogue between the Kyoto School of modern Japanese philosophy and the classical pragmatist tradition in American philosophy can help educators to clarify aims for greater ecological responsiveness in moral education. This dialogue can contribute to meeting an urgent practical need to cultivate ecological imagination, and an equally practical need to make theoretical sense of the way in which ecological perception becomes relevant to moral deliberation. The first section of this chapter explores relational thinking in the Kyoto School and American (...)
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  33. Intercambios filosóficos entre Japón y Europa.Montserrat Crespin Perales - 2013 - Departamento Arte y Humanidades- Universitat Oberta de Catalunya.
    Cuestiones alrededor de los intercambios filosóficos entre Japón y Europa.
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  34.  11
    Modern Zen and Psychoanalysis: The Semantic Connection.Rossa Ó Muireartaigh - 2016 - European Journal of Japanese Philosophy 1:189-202.
    This paper attempts to locate modern Zen and psychoanalysis in terms of contemporary philosophy of mind, particularly in view of dominant theories of cognitivism that see the mind as informational and material, with meaning being mere information in disguise. Psychoanalysis and modern Zen hold to the contrary view that the mind is “semantic,” not “syntactic,” and that the meanings we have in our heads are not reducible to the physical informational processes from which they have emerged. Meaning, as non-reducible, is (...)
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  35.  15
    Sacred Appellations: Secular Zen, New Materialism, and D. T. Suzuki’s Soku-Hi Logic.Rossa Ó Muireartaigh - 2017 - European Journal of Japanese Philosophy 2:69-83.
    The logic of soku-hi is presented as an articulation of a post-Kantian view of reality that embraces the truths of science with the assumption of the transcendental subject. As such, soku-hi represents the philosophical posture of both the secular Zen of the Kyoto School and the new materialists of contemporary continental philosophy. It describes how material reality is not all even though there is nothing else.
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  36.  18
    An Apology for Philosophical Transgressions.James W. Heisig - 2017 - European Journal of Japanese Philosophy 2:43-67.
    The essay that follows is, in substance, a lecture delivered in Brussels on 7 December 2016 to the 2nd International Conference of the European Network of Japanese Philosophy. In it I argue that the strategy of qualifying nothingness as an “absolute,” which was adopted by Kyoto School thinkers as a way to come to grips with fundamental problems of Western philosophy, is inherently ambiguous and ultimately weakens the notion of nothingness itself. In its place, a proposal is made to define (...)
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  37. Leibliches Üben als Teil einer philosophischen Lebenskunst: Die Verkörperung von Kata in den japanischen Wegkünsten.Leon Krings - 2017 - European Journal of Japanese Philosophy 2:179-197.
    In this paper, I try to show how Japanese practices of self-cultivation found in the so-called “ways” can be interpreted as embodied forms of “caring for oneself ” and, therefore, as part of a philosophical Lebenskunst or art of living. To this end, I refer to phenomenological accounts of the body as well as to a unique notion of practice found in the writings of Dōgen Kigen, a thirteenth-century Japanese Zen master. Central to this essay is a concern with embodying (...)
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