Results for 'Paradox of negative emotions in art'

1000+ found
Order:
  1. Emotion in the Appreciation of Fiction.Ingrid Vendrell Ferran - 2018 - Journal of Literary Theory 12.
    Why is it that we respond emotionally to plays, movies, and novels and feel moved by characters and situations that we know do not exist? This question, which constitutes the kernel of the debate on »the paradox of fiction«, speaks to the perennial themes of philosophy, and remains of interest to this day. But does this question entail a paradox? A significant group of analytic philosophers have indeed thought so. Since the publication of Colin Radford's celebrated paper »How (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  2. On the Value of Sad Music.Mario Attie-Picker, Tara Venkatesan, George E. Newman & Joshua Knobe - 2024 - The Journal of Aesthetic Education 58 (1):46-65.
    Many people appear to attach great value to sad music. But why? One way to gain insight into this question is to turn away from music and look instead at why people value sad conversations. In the case of conversations, the answer seems to be that expressing sadness creates a sense of genuine connection. We propose that sad music can also have this type of value. Listening to a sad song can give one a sense of genuine connection. We then (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  3. From the Sympathetic Principle to the Nerve Fibres and Back. Revisiting Edmund Burke’s Solutions to the ‘Paradox of Negative Emotions’.Botond Csuka - 2020 - In Piroska Balogh & Gergely Fórizs (eds.), Angewandte anthropologische Ästhetik. Konzepte und Praktiken 1700–1900/ Applied Anthropological Aesthetics. Concepts and Practices 1700–1900. (Bochumer Quellen und Forschungen zum achtzehnten Jahrhundert, 11). Wehrhahn Verlag. pp. 139–173.
    The paper explores Burke’s twofold solution to the paradox of negative emotions. His Philosophical Enquiry (1757/59) employs two models that stand on different anthropological principles: the Exercise Argument borrowed from authors like the Abbé Du Bos, guided by the principle of self-preservation, and the Sympathy Argument, propageted by notable men of lettres such as Lord Kames, ruled by the principle of sociability. Burke interlocks these two arguments through a teleologically-ordered physiology, in which the natural laws of the (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4. Art and negative affect.Aaron Smuts - 2009 - Philosophy Compass 4 (1):39-55.
    Why do people seemingly want to be scared by movies and feel pity for fictional characters when they avoid situations in real life that arouse these same negative emotions? Although the domain of relevant artworks encompasses far more than just tragedy, the general problem is typically called the paradox of tragedy. The paradox boils down to a simple question: If people avoid pain then why do people want to experience art that is painful? I discuss six (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   31 citations  
  5. Playing with Fire: Art and the Seductive Power of Pain.Iskra Fileva - 2013 - In Jerrold Levinson (ed.), Suffering Art Gladly: The Paradox of Negative Emotions in Art. Palgrave/Macmillan.
    I discuss the aesthetic power of painful art. I focus on artworks that occasion pain by “hitting too close to home,” i.e., by presenting narratives meant to be “about us.” I consider various reasons why such works may have aesthetic value for us, but I argue that the main reason has to do with the power of such works to transgress conversational boundaries. The discussion is meant as a contribution to the debate on the paradox of tragedy.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  6. Painful Art and the Limits of Well-Being.Aaron Smuts - 2013 - In Jerrold Levinson (ed.), Suffering Art Gladly: The Paradox of Negative Emotions in Art. Palgrave/Macmillan.
    In this chapter I explore what painful art can tell us about the nature and importance of human welfare. My goal is not so much to defend a new solution to the paradox of tragedy, as it is to explore the implications of the kinds of solutions that I find attractive. Both nonhedonic compensatory theories and constitutive theories explain why people seek out painful art, but they have troublesome implications. On some narrow theories of well-being, they imply that painful (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  7. That Obscure Object of Desire: Pleasure in Painful Art.Jonathan Gilmore - 2013 - In Jerrold Levinson (ed.), Suffering Art Gladly: The Paradox of Negative Emotions in Art. Palgrave/Macmillan.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  8. 4E cognition and the mind-expanding arts.Miranda Anderson - 2022 - European Journal of Philosophy in Arts Education 1 (7):7-64.
    Examining imagination, 4E cognition and the arts together expands our understanding of them all. 4E cognition is a framework that comprises the theories separately known as embodied, enactive, embedded, and extended cognition. This paper draws on research in cognitive science (including 4E and recent predictive processing approaches), ideas in phenomenology, and artworks from The Extended Mind exhibition (2019–20). The artworks offer diverse reflections on 4E cognition, as well as revealing personal, political and ethical benefits and issues predicated on a 4E (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  9. The Paradox of Suspense Realism.Christy Mag Uidhir - 2011 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 69 (2):161-171.
    Most theories of suspense implicitly or explicitly have as a background assumption what I call suspense realism, i.e., that suspense is itself a genuine, distinct emotion. I claim that for a theory of suspense to entail suspense realism is for that theory to entail a contradiction, and so, we ought instead assume a background of suspense eliminativism, i.e., that there is no such genuine, distinct emotion that is the emotion of suspense. More precisely, I argue that i) any suspense realist (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  10. Touching the Earth: Buddhist (and Kierkegaardian) Reflections on and of the ‘NegativeEmotions.Rupert Read - 2023 - Religions 14 (12):1451.
    This article develops the philosophical work of Joanna Macy. It argues that ecological grief is a fitting response to our ecological predicament and that much of the ‘mental ill health’ that we are now seeing is, in fact, a perfectly sane response to our ecological reality. This paper claims that all ecological emotions are grounded in love/compassion. Acceptance of these emotions reveals that everything is fine in the world as it is, providing that we accept our ecological (...) as part of what is ‘in the world’. This is non-dualistic acceptance or ‘fierce’ acceptance. This paper focuses primarily on the revolutionary qualities of ecological grief: a paradoxical revolution, coming as it does from a profound process of acceptance. (shrink)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  11. 4E Cognition and the Mind-Expanding Arts.Miranda Anderson - 2022 - European Journal of Philosophy in Arts Education 1 (7):7-64.
    Examining imagination, 4E cognition and the arts together expands our understanding of them all. 4E cognition is a framework that comprises the theories separately known as embodied, enactive, embedded, and extended cognition. This paper draws on research in cognitive science (including 4E and recent predictive processing approaches), ideas in phenomenology, and artworks from The Extended Mind exhibition (2019–20). The artworks offer diverse reflections on 4E cognition, as well as revealing personal, political and ethical benefits and issues predicated on a 4E (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  12. The phenomenon of negative emotions in the social existence of human.Tatyana Pavlova & V. V. Bobyl - 2018 - Anthropological Measurements of Philosophical Research 14:94-93.
    Purpose. The research is aimed at determining the influence of negative ethical emotions on social life and the activity of the individual, which involves solving the following problems: a) to find out approaches to the typology of ethical emotions, b) to highlight individual negative ethical emotions and to determine their ability to influence human behaviour. Theoretical basis. The theoretical and methodological basis of the research is the recognition of the significant influence of negative (...) on human activity in society. In this regard, it is proposed to consider them as a complex multidisciplinary phenomenon, which is predetermined by both social and personal factors of origin and has a certain specificity of objectification. Originality. The authors determined that in addition to destructive effects on a person of negative emotions, they can also have a constructive effect on person’s behaviour, due primarily to the fact that a person does not want to experience these emotions and therefore tries to avoid situations they cause. Conclusions. The ethical emotions of guilt, embarrassment, anger, disgust and contempt can affect, through the cognitive aspect of the emotional process, the decision-making process of people when they predict situations in which they risk to feel such emotions. So the emotion of guilt creates a constructive setup aimed at correcting inappropriate social norms of human behaviour. The emotion of embarrassment motivates a person to behave more benevolently in society in order to integrate in it and get its approval, thus encouraging the person to adhere to social and moral agreements and norms. The emotion of anger motivates a person to act to eliminate injustice, herewith not only in relation to himself, but also in relation to others. Rejecting those people who cause moral and social aversion, society creates a system of punishments and rewards that acts as a strong deterrent to the socio-cultural behaviour. The emotion of contempt performs the function of preventing punishment in relation to the despised individual. (shrink)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  13. Thoughts on the 'paradox' of fiction.Kathleen Stock - 2006 - Postgraduate Journal of Aesthetics 3 (2):59-65.
    This paper concerns the familiar topic of whether we can have genuinely emotional responses such as pity and fear to characters and situations we believe to be fictional1. As is well known, Kendall Walton responds in the negative (Walton (1978); (1990): 195-204 and Chapter 7; (1997)). That is, he is an ‘irrealist’ about emotional responses to fiction (the term is Gaut’s (2003): 15), arguing that such responses should be construed as quasiemotions (Walton (1990): 245), of which their possessor imagines (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  14. Pleased and Afflicted: Hume on the Paradox of Tragic Pleasure.Eva M. Dadlez - 2004 - Hume Studies 30 (2):213-236.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:Hume Studies Volume 30, Number 2, November 2004, pp. 213-236 Pleased and Afflicted: Hume on the Paradox of Tragic Pleasure E. M. DADLEZ How fast can you run? As fast as a leopard. How fast are you going to run? A whistle sounds the order that sends Archie Hamilton and his comrades over the top of the trench to certain death. Racing to circumvent that order and arriving (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  15. Sailing the Seas of Cheese.Erik Anderson - 2010 - Contemporary Aesthetics 8.
    Memphis Elvis is cool; Vegas Elvis is cheesy. How come? To call something cheesy is, ostensibly, to disparage it, and yet cheesy acts are some of the most popular in popular culture today. How is this possible? The concepts of cheese, cheesy, and cheesiness play an important and increasingly ubiquitous role in popular culture today. I offer an analysis of these concepts, distinguishing them from nearby concepts like kitchy and campy. Along the way I draw attention to the important roles (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  16. Is the Paradox of Fiction Soluble in Psychology?Florian Cova & Fabrice Teroni - 2016 - Philosophical Psychology 29 (6):930-942.
    If feeling a genuine emotion requires believing that its object actually exists, and if this is a belief we are unlikely to have about fictional entities, then how could we feel genuine emotions towards these entities? This question lies at the core of the paradox of fiction. Since its original formulation, this paradox has generated a substantial literature. Until recently, the dominant strategy had consisted in trying to solve it. Yet, it is more and more frequent for (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  17. Emoções Musicais.Federico Lauria - 2023 - Compêndio Em Linha de Problemas de Filosofia Analítica, Ricardo Santos e David Yates (Eds.), Lisboa: Centro de Filosofia da Universidade de Lisboa.
    A música pode causar emoções fortes. Como havemos de compreender as respostas afetivas à música? Este artigo apresenta os principais enigmas filosóficos atinentes às emoções musicais. O problema principal diz respeito ao chamado "contágio": os ouvintes percebem a música como sendo expressiva de uma certa emoção (por exemplo, tristeza) e a música suscita neles essa mesma emoção. O contágio é desconcertante, pois entra em conflito com a principal teoria da emoção, de acordo com a qual as emoções são experiências de (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  18. Ugliness Is in the Gut of the Beholder.Ryan P. Doran - 2022 - Ergo: An Open Access Journal of Philosophy 9 (5):88-146.
    I offer the first sustained defence of the claim that ugliness is constituted by the disposition to disgust. I advance three main lines of argument in support of this thesis. First, ugliness and disgustingness tend to lie in the same kinds of things and properties (the argument from ostensions). Second, the thesis is better placed than all existing accounts to accommodate the following facts: ugliness is narrowly and systematically distributed in a heterogenous set of things, ugliness is sometimes enjoyed, and (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  19. Anxiety: A Case Study on the Value of Negative Emotions.Charlie Kurth - 2011 - In Christine Tappolet, Fabrice Teroni & Anita Konzelman Ziv (eds.), Philosophical Perspectives on Negative Emotions: Shadows of the Soul. New York: Routledge. pp. 95-104.
    Negative emotions are often thought to lack value—they’re pernicious, inherently unpleasant, and inconsistent with human virtue. Taking anxiety as a case study, I argue that this assessment is mistaken. I begin with an account of what anxiety is: a response to uncertainty about a possible threat or challenge that brings thoughts about one’s predicament (‘I’m worried,’ ‘What should I do?’), negatively valenced feelings of concern, and a motivational tendency toward caution regarding the potential threat one faces. Given this (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  20.  84
    The paradox of tragedy, or why (almost) all emotions can be enjoyed.Mathilde Cappelli & Benoit Gaultier - forthcoming - American Philosophical Quarterly.
    We regularly intentionally expose ourselves to fictions we take to be likely to elicit in us emotions we generally find unpleasant when prompted by actual states of affairs. This is the so-called “paradox of tragedy”. We contribute to solving the paradox of tragedy by denying that, when fiction-directed, most of these emotions are in themselves unpleasant. We first provide strong evidence that these emotions, such as fear, sadness, or pity, are often enjoyed when fiction-directed. We (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  21. Negative emotions towards others are diminished in remitted major depression.Roland Zahn, Karen Lythe, Jennifer Gethin, Sophie Green, J. F. William Deakin, Clifford Ian Workman & Jorge Moll - 2015 - European Psychiatry 30 (4):448-453.
    Background: -/- One influential view is that vulnerability to major depressive disorder (MDD) is associated with a proneness to experience negative emotions in general. In contrast, blame attribution theories emphasise the importance of blaming oneself rather than others for negative events. Our previous exploratory study provided support for the attributional hypothesis that patients with remitted MDD show no overall bias towards negative emotions, but a selective bias towards emotions entailing self-blame relative to emotions (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  22. Emotions in the Listener: A Criterion of Artistic Relevance.Matteo Ravasio - 2017 - American Society for Aesthetics Graduate E-Journal 9 (1).
    Philosophers of music and psychologists have examined the various ways in which music is capable of arousing emotions in a listener. Among philosophers, opinions diverge as to the different types of music-induced emotions and as to their relevance to music listening. A somewhat neglected question concerns the possibility of developing a general criterion for the artistic relevance of music-induced emotions. In this paper, I will try to formulate such a criterion. In whatever way music may induce (...) and regardless of the sorts of emotion music is taken to arouse, a given emotion will qualify as artistically relevant if and only if it is caused by appropriate listening, it is dependent on features of the piece of music as a work of art and is capable of further directing our attention to such features. (shrink)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  23. Art as a Form of Negative Dialectics: 'Theory' in Adorno's Aesthetic Theory.William D. Melaney - 1997 - Journal of Speculative Philosophy 11 (1):40 - 52.
    Adorno’s dialectical approach to aesthetics is perhaps understood better in terms of his monumental work, 'Aesthetic Theory,' which attempts to relate the speculative tradition in philosophical aesthetics to the situation of art in twentieth-century society, than in terms of purely theoretical claims. This paper demonstrates that Adorno embraces the Kantian thesis concerning art’s autonomy and that he criticizes transcendental philosophy. It also discusses how Adorno provides the outlines for a dialectical conception of artistic truth in relation to his argument with (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  24. The Paradox of Fear in Classical Indian Buddhism.Bronwyn Finnigan - 2021 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 49 (5):913-929.
    The Buddhist Nikāya Suttas frequently mention the concept of fear (bhaya) and related synonyms. This concept does not receive much scholarly attention by subsequent Buddhist philosophers. Recent scholars identify a ‘paradox of fear’ in several traditions of classical Indian Buddhism (Brekke 1999, Finnigan 2019, Giustarini 2012). Each scholar points out, in their respective textual contexts, that fear is evaluated in two ways; one positive and the other negative. Brekke calls this the “double role” of fear (1999: 443). Each (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  25. Paradoxes of Emotional Life: Second-Order Emotions.Antonio de Castro Caeiro - 2022 - Philosophies 7 (5):109.
    Heidegger tries to explain our emotional life applying three schemes: causal explanation, mental internalisation of emotions and metaphorical expression. None of the three schemes explains emotion though. Either because the causal nexus does not always occur or because objects and people in the external world are carriers of emotional agents or because language is already on a metaphorical level. Moreover, how is it possible that there are presently emotions constituting our life without our being aware of their existence? (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  26. Consuming Fictions Part III: Immersion, Emotion, and the Paradox of Fiction.Peter Langland-Hassan - 2020 - In Explaining Imagination. Oxford: Oxford University Press. pp. 234-261.
    The chapter considers the “paradox of fiction,” understood as the claim that it is in some sense irrational or inappropriate to respond emotionally to mere fictions. Several theorists have held that special features of imagination, or other “arational” mental reflexes, play a role in its resolution. I argue, to the contrary, that imagination need not enter into the solution, and that the paradox can be resolved in a way that shows our responses to fictions to be reasonable and (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  27. Music, emotion and metaphor.Nick Zangwill - 2007 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 65 (4):391-400.
    We describe music in terms of emotion. How should we understand this? Some say that emotion descriptions should be understood literally. Let us call those views “literalist.” By contrast “nonliteralists” deny this and say that such descriptions are typically metaphorical.1 This issue about the linguistic description of music is connected with a central issue about the na- ture of music. That issue is whether there is any essential connection between music and emotion. According to what we can call “emotion theories,” (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  28. Art, Metaphysics, & the Paradox of Standards.Christy Mag Uidhir - 2013 - In Art & Abstract Objects. Oxford University Press.
    I consider the field of aesthetics to be at its most productive and engaging when adopting a broadly philosophically informative approach to its core issues (e.g., shaping and testing putative art theoretic commitments against the relevant standard models employed in philosophy of language, metaphysics, and philosophy of mind) and to be at its most impotent and bewildering when cultivating a philosophically insular character (e.g., selecting interpretative, ontological, or conceptual models solely for fit with pre-fixed art theoretic commitments). For example, when (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  29. The Dark Side of the Exceptional: On Moral Exemplars, Character Education, and Negative Emotions.Maria Silvia Vaccarezza & Ariele Niccoli - 2019 - Journal of Moral Education 48 (3):332-345.
    This paper focuses on negative exemplarity-related emotions (NEREs) and on their educational implications. In this paper, we will first argue for the nonexpendability of negative emotions broadly conceived (section 2) by defending their instrumental and intrinsic role in a good and flourishing life. In section 3, we will make the claim more specific by focusing on the narrower domain of NEREs and argue for their moral and educational significance by evaluating whether they fit the arguments provided (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  30. Really Boring Art.Andreas Elpidorou & John Gibson - 2022 - Ergo: An Open Access Journal of Philosophy 8 (30):190-218.
    There is little question as to whether there is good boring art, though its existence raises a number of questions for both the philosophy of art and the philosophy of emotions. How can boredom ever be a desideratum of art? How can our standing commitments concerning the nature of aesthetic experience and artistic value accommodate the existence of boring art? How can being bored constitute an appropriate mode of engagement with a work of art as a work of art? (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  31. Negative Emotions.Steven M. Duncan - manuscript
    I have a theory of the emotions that many people find unflattering. I contend that all emotions, as such, are negative and neither life-enhancing nor truth-connected. In this essay, I present this theory and my reasons for it.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  32. Collaboration in the Third Culture.Stacie Friend - 2018 - Projections: The Journal for Movies and Mind 12 (2):39-49.
    In Film, Art and the Third Culture, Murray Smith articulates and defends a naturalized aesthetics of film that exemplifies a “third culture,” integrating the insights and methods of the natural sciences with those of the arts and humanities. By contrast with skeptics who reject the relevance of psychology or neuroscience to the study of film and art, I agree with Smith that we should embrace the third-cultural project. However, I argue that Smith does not go far enough in in developing (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  33. The role of emotions in complex problem solving.Miriam Spering, Dietrich Wagener & Joachim Funke - 2005 - Cognition and Emotion 19 (8):1252-1261.
    The assumption that positive affect leads to a better performance in simple cognitive tasks has become well established. We address the question whether positive and negative emotions differentially influence performance in complex problem-solving in the same way. Emotions were induced by positive or negative feedback in 74 participants who had to manage a computer-simulated complex problem-solving scenario. Results show that overall scenario performance is not affected, but positive and negative emotions elicit distinguishable problem-solving strategies: (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  34. Exemplification, Knowledge, and Education of the Emotions through Conceptual Art.Elisa Caldarola - 2021 - Discipline Filosofiche (1).
    In this paper, with reference to Vito Acconci’s Following Piece (1969) and Sophie Calle’s Take care of yourself (2007), I show that some works of conceptual art rely on exemplification to convey ideas, and I defend the following claims about those works. In the first place, I argue that the kinds of events and of objects they present us with are relevant for appreciating the views the works convey. In the second place, siding with Elisabeth Schellekens (2007) and Peter Goldie (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  35. The role of emotions in complex problem-solving.Miriam Spering, Daniel Wagener & Joachim Funke - 2005 - Cognition and Emotion 19:1252-1261.
    The assumption that positive affect leads to a better performance in simple cognitive tasks has become well established. We address the question whether positive and negative emotions differentially influence performance in complex problem-solving in the same way. Emotions were induced by positive or negative feedback in 74 participants who had to manage a computer-simulated complex problem-solving scenario. Results show that overall scenario performance is not affected, but positive and negative emotions elicit distinguishable problem-solving strategies: (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  36. Rubber Ring: Why do we listen to sad songs?Aaron Smuts - 2011 - In Noël Carroll & John Gibson (eds.), Narrative, Emotion, and Insight. Pennsylvania State University Press. pp. 131.
    In this essay, I discuss a few ways in which songs are used, ways in which listeners engage with and find meaning in music. I am most interested in sad songs—those that typically feature narratives about lost love, separation, missed opportunity, regret, hardship, and all manner of heartache. Many of us are drawn to sad songs in moments of emotional distress. The problem is that sad songs do not always make us feel better; to the contrary, they often make us (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  37. The Affective Nature of Horror.Filippo Contesi - 2022 - In Max Ryynänen, Heidi Kosonen & Susanne Ylönen (eds.), Cultural Approaches to Disgust and the Visceral. Routledge. pp. 31-43.
    The horror genre (in film, literature etc.) has, for its seemingly paradoxical aesthetic appeal, been the subject of much debate in contemporary, analytic philosophy of art. At the same time, however, the nature of horror as an affective phenomenon has been largely neglected by both aestheticians and philosophers of mind. The standard view of the affective nature of horror in contemporary philosophy follows Noël Carroll in holding that horror in art (or “art-horror”) is an emotion resulting from the combination of (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  38. Enduring positivity: Children of incarcerated parents report more positive than negative emotions when thinking about close others.James Dunlea - 2020 - Journal of Cognition and Development 21:494-512.
    Millions of children in the United States experience parental incarcera- tion, yet it is unclear how this experience might shape social cognition. We asked children of incarcerated parents (N = 24) and children whose parents were not incarcerated (N = 58) to describe their parents. Both groups of children also rated the extent to which they agree that they feel positive and, separately, negative emotions when thinking about their parent and best friend. This approach allowed us to test (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  39. Twenty-first century perspectivism: The role of emotions in scientific inquiry.Mark Alfano - 2017 - Studi di Estetica 7 (1):65-79.
    How should emotions figure in scientific practice? I begin by distinguishing three broad answers to this question, ranging from pessimistic to optimistic. Confirmation bias and motivated numeracy lead us to cast a jaundiced eye on the role of emotions in scientific inquiry. However, reflection on the essential motivating role of emotions in geniuses makes it less clear that science should be evacuated of emotion. I then draw on Friedrich Nietzsche’s perspectivism to articulate a twenty-first century epistemology of (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  40. Boredom in art.Andreas Elpidorou - 2017 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 40.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  41. Explaining the Paradoxes of Logic – The Nub of the Matter and its Pragmatics.Dieter Wandschneider - 1993 - In PRAGMATIK, Vol. IV. Hamburg:
    [[[ (Here only the chapters 3 – 8, see *** ) First I argue that the prohibition of linguistic self-reference as a solution to the antinomy problem contains a pragmatic contradiction and is thus not only too restrictive, but just inconsistent (chap.1). Furthermore, the possibilities of non-restrictive strategies for antinomy avoidance are discussed, whereby the explicit inclusion of the – pragmatically presuposed – consistency requirement proves to be the optimal strategy (chap.2). ]]] The central question here is that about the (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  42. The Democratic Paradox of Duterte: Mapping the cognitive-affective ideological structure of leftist student organizations in Manila and Davao.Patricia Eunice Miraflores - 2021 - APCoRE Online Journal of Proceedings 1(1).
    The ongoing war on drugs in the Philippines has become the epicenter of discourse and concern regarding human rights, populism, and illiberal democracy. While most studies focus on President Duterte's controversial 'strongman' persona and mass appeal, very few have sought to analyze the locals' attitudes towards him as cognitive-affective phenomena. To address this gap, this paper provides an in-depth qualitative analysis of pre-selected subjects in Davao and Manila, two regions in the Philippines with arguably the most salient pro-and anti-Duterte populations, (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  43. Korsmeyer on Fiction and Disgust.Filippo Contesi - 2015 - British Journal of Aesthetics 55 (1):109-116.
    In Savoring Disgust, Carolyn Korsmeyer argues that disgust is peculiar amongst emotions, for it does not need any of the standard solutions to the so-called paradox of fiction. I argue that Korsmeyer’s arguments in support of the peculiarity of disgust with respect to the paradox of fiction are not successful.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  44. Modern Paradoxes of Aristotle’s Logic.Jason Aleksander - 2004 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 9 (1):79-99.
    This paper intends to explain key differences between Aristotle’s understanding of the relationships between nous, epistêmê, and the art of syllogistic reasoning(both analytic and dialectical) and the corresponding modern conceptions of intuition, knowledge, and reason. By uncovering paradoxa that Aristotle’s understanding of syllogistic reasoning presents in relation to modern philosophical conceptions of logic and science, I highlight problems of a shift in modern philosophy—a shift that occurs most dramatically in the seventeenth century—toward a project of construction, a pervasive desire for (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  45. Self-Deception as Affective Coping. An Empirical Perspective on Philosophical Issues.Federico Lauria, Delphine Preissmann & Fabrice Clément - 2016 - Consciousness and Cognition 41:119-134.
    In the philosophical literature, self-deception is mainly approached through the analysis of paradoxes. Yet, it is agreed that self-deception is motivated by protection from distress. In this paper, we argue, with the help of findings from cognitive neuroscience and psychology, that self-deception is a type of affective coping. First, we criticize the main solutions to the paradoxes of self-deception. We then present a new approach to self-deception. Self-deception, we argue, involves three appraisals of the distressing evidence: (a) appraisal of the (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  46. Savoring Disgust: The Foul and the Fair in Aesthetics. [REVIEW]Filippo Contesi - 2012 - British Journal of Aesthetics 52 (1):113-116.
    Carolyn Korsmeyer’s Savoring Disgust is a book that, in spite of its seemingly unsavoury subject matter, deserves to be widely read. Written in an accessible yet richly suggestive prose, it is the first systematic investigation in English-speaking contemporary philosophy of the aesthetic and artistic significance of the emotion of disgust. Korsmeyer’s book discusses a wealth of issues that is difficult to match and presents a comprehensive and organic approach to a previously underexplored topic. The intelligence of its analysis and the (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  47. Expression And Expressiveness In Art.Jenefer Robinson - 2007 - Postgraduate Journal of Aesthetics 4 (2):19-41.
    The concept of expression in the arts is Janus-faced. On the one hand expression is an author-centered notion: many Romantic poets, painters, and musicians thought of themselves as pouring our or ex-pressing their own emotions in their artworks. And on the other hand, expression is an audience-centered notion, the communication of what is expressed by an author to members of an audience. Typically the word “expression” is used for the author-centered aspect of expression as a whole, and the word (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  48. The Emotional Response of Filipino Teachers-in-Training to Memes.Vemma Mae R. Guinto - 2022 - Universal Journal of Educational Research 1 (2):19-25.
    Memes on the internet are created content to express knowledge, entertain, ridicule, and self-actualize. The purpose of this study was to assess the emotional response to memes and their link to the profile of Filipino teachers-in-training. The descriptive-correlation research method was used in this study. A questionnaire-checklist was utilized to assess the effects of online memes on the emotions of teachers-in-training. The data was treated using frequency counts, percentages, and the average weighted mean. The association between profile and the (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  49. Mirrors of the soul and mirrors of the brain? The expression of emotions as the subject of art and science.Machiel Keestra - 2014 - In Gary Schwartz (ed.), Emotions. Pain and pleasure in Dutch painting of the Golden Age. nai010 publishers. pp. 81-92.
    Is it not surprising that we look with so much pleasure and emotion at works of art that were made thousands of years ago? Works depicting people we do not know, people whose backgrounds are usually a mystery to us, who lived in a very different society and time and who, moreover, have been ‘frozen’ by the artist in a very deliberate pose. It was the Classical Greek philosopher Aristotle who observed in his Poetics that people could apparently be moved (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  50. Art and Emotion.Filippo Contesi - 2018 - Oxford Bibliographies in Philosophy.
    The study of the arts in philosophy has often concentrated on the role that emotions (and affective responses more generally) play in art’s creation and value. Philosophical theories of art have sometimes even defined art in terms of its capacity to elicit or express emotions. Philosophers have debated such questions as what it is to express an emotion in art; whether emotions form part of the value of an artwork; whether the emotions involved in art appreciation (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
1 — 50 / 1000