Results for 'Polish women’s writing'

996 found
Order:
  1. Conceptualizing Generation and Transformation in Women’s Writing.Urszula Chowaniec & Marzenna Jakubczak - 2012 - Argument: Biannual Philosophical Journal 2 (1):5-16.
    The main objective of this collection of papers is to explore ideas of generation and transformation in the context of postdependency discourse as it may be traced in women’s writing published in Bengali, Polish, Czech, Russian and English. As we believe, literature does not have merely a descriptive function or a purely visionary quality but serves also as a discursive medium, which is rhetorically sophisticated, imaginatively influential and stimulates cultural dynamics. It is an essential carrier of collective (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2. Diverse Voices: Czech Women’s Writing in the Post-Communist Era.Elena Sokol - 2012 - Argument: Biannual Philosophical Journal 2 (1):37-58.
    This essay offers an overview of the diversity of women’s prose writing that emerged on the Czech cultural scene in the post-communist era. To that end it briefly characterizes the work of eight Czech women authors who were born within the first two decades after World War II and began to create during the post-1968 era of ‘normalization’. In this broad sense they belong to a single generation. With rare exception their work was not officially published in their (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3. Memorable Fiction. Evoking Emotions and Family Bonds in Post-Soviet Russian Women’s Writing.Marja Rytkӧnen - 2012 - Argument: Biannual Philosophical Journal 2 (1):59-74.
    This article deals with women-centred prose texts of the 1990s and 2000s in Russia written by women, and focuses especially on generation narratives. By this term the author means fictional texts that explore generational relations within families, from the perspective of repressed experiences, feelings and attitudes in the Soviet period. The selected texts are interpreted as narrating and conceptualizing the consequences of patriarchal ideology for relations between mothers and daughters and for reconstructing connections between Soviet and post-Soviet by revisiting and (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4. Similarities and Differences in Postcolonial Bengali Women’s Writings: The Case of Mahasweta Debi and Mallika Sengupta.Blanka Knotková-Čapková - 2012 - Argument: Biannual Philosophical Journal 2 (1):97-116.
    The emancipation of women has become a strong critical discourse in Bengali literature since the 19th century. Only since the second half of the 20th century, however, have female writers markedly stepped out of the shadow of their male colleagues, and the writings on women become more and more often articulated by women themselves. In this article, I focus on particular concepts of femininity in selected texts of two outstanding writers of different generations, a prose writer, and a woman poet: (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5.  35
    Selfhood and Self-Government in Women’s Religious Writings of the Early Modern Period.Jacqueline Broad - 2019 - International Journal of Philosophical Studies 27 (5):713-730.
    Some scholars have identified a puzzle in the writings of Mary Astell (1666–1731), a deeply religious feminist thinker of the early modern period. On the one hand, Astell strongly urges her fellow women to preserve their independence of judgement from men; yet, on the other, she insists upon those same women maintaining a submissive deference to the Anglican church. These two positions appear to be incompatible. In this paper, I propose a historical-contextualist solution to the puzzle: I argue that the (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  6. Generation, Transformation and Place in Inga Iwasiów’s Novels Bambino (2008) and Ku Słońcu (2010).Ursula Phillips - 2012 - Argument: Biannual Philosophical Journal 2 (1):17-36.
    This paper discusses two novels by contemporary writer Inga Iwasiów (b. 1963), Bambino (2008) and Ku słońcu [Towards the Sun] (2010), in the context of geopolitical, ideological, social and psycho-cultural transformations as they specifically affect different generations of inhabitants of the Polish city of Szczecin (pre-1945 German Stettin) from 1945 until the first decade of the 21st century. Bambino covers the years 1945–1981, but also contains flashbacks to pre-war memory of Stettin and to the suppressed experiences of the new (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7. Liberty and the Right of Resistance: Women's Political Writings of the English Civil War Era.Jacqueline Broad - 2007 - In Jacqueline Broad & Karen Green (eds.), Virtue, Liberty, and Toleration: Political Ideas of European Women, 1400-1800. Springer. pp. 77-94.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  8. Ashapurna Devi’s “Women” – Emerging Identities in Colonial and Postcolonial Bengal.Suchorita Chattopadhyay - 2012 - Argument: Biannual Philosophical Journal 2 (1):75-96.
    Ashapurna Devi, a prominent Bengali woman novelist (1909–1995) focused on women’s creativity and enlightenment during the colonial and postcolonial period in Bengal, India. She herself displayed immense will power, tenacity and an indomitable spirit which enabled her to eke out a prominent place for herself in the world of creative writing. Her life spanned both colonial India and independent India and these diverse experiences shaped her mind and persona and helped her to portray the emerging face of the (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  9. Women and Liberty, 1600-1800: Philosophical Essays.Jacqueline Broad & Karen Detlefsen - 2018 - Oxford University Press.
    There have been many different historical-intellectual accounts of the shaping and development of concepts of liberty in pre-Enlightenment Europe. This volume is unique for addressing the subject of liberty principally as it is discussed in the writings of women philosophers, and as it is theorized with respect to women and their lives, during this period. The volume covers ethical, political, metaphysical, and religious notions of liberty, with some chapters discussing women's ideas about the metaphysics of free will, and others examining (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  10.  41
    Women Academe and Criticism of Nigerian Culture: The Input of Mabel Evwierhoma Through Theatre Scholarship.O. B. I. Nwagbo Pat & Fidelis Chukwujekwu Ndigwe - manuscript
    The giant strides to be taken in becoming an academic do not just entail acquiring knowledge through formal education but demand further steps to master, philosophize and profess knowledge. Apart from the credentials to show that quality conditions were fulfilled in a higher education, volumes of well researched publications in peer review academic journals are vital. In Nigeria, when this form of learning came through colonial education women were not as privileged as men to acquire it immediately. So, men become (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  11. Reclamation From Absence? Luce Irigaray and Women in the History of Philosophy.Sarah Tyson - 2013 - Hypatia 28 (3):483-498.
    Luce Irigaray's work does not present an obvious resource for projects seeking to reclaim women in the history of philosophy. Indeed, many authors introduce their reclamation project with an argument against conceptions, attributed to Irigaray or “French feminists” more generally, that the feminine is the excluded other of discourse. These authors claim that if the feminine is the excluded other of discourse, then we must conclude that even if women have written philosophy they have not given voice to feminine subjectivity; (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  12. Revolutionizing Agency: Sameness and Difference in the Representation of Women by Rokeya Sakhawat Hossain and Mahasweta Devi.Prasita Mukherjee - 2012 - Argument: Biannual Philosophical Journal 2 (1):117-128.
    In this paper the sameness and difference between two distinguished Indian authors, Rokeya Sakhawat Hossain (1880–1932) and Mahasweta Devi (b. 1926), representing two generations almost a century apart, will be under analysis in order to trace the generational transformation in women’s writing in India, especially Bengal. Situated in the colonial and postcolonial frames of history, Hossain and Mahasweta Devi may be contextualized differently. At the same time their subjects are also differently categorized; the former is not particularly concerned (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  13. Impressions in the Brain: Malebranche on Women, and Women on Malebranche.Jacqueline Broad - 2012 - Intellectual History Review 22 (3):373-389.
    In his De la recherche de la vérité (The Search after Truth) of 1674-75, Nicolas Malebranche makes a number of apparently contradictory remarks about women and their capacity for pure intellectual thought. On the one hand, he seems to espouse a negative biological determinism about women’s minds, and on the other, he suggests that women have the free capacity to attain truth and happiness, regardless of their physiology. In the early eighteenth-century, four English women thinkers – Anne Docwra (c. (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  14. Historiography After Revisionism. Remarks on Pomian’s Idea of Writing History.Marcin Leszczyński - 2017 - Hybris. Internetowy Magazyn Filozoficzny 37:103-113.
    Krzysztof Pomian’s works on history are one of the most interesting theoretical achievements of contemporary humanities. Being one of the prominent revisionists, Pomian took part in an important period of Polish history. Revisionist movement has also played an important role in shaping some basic ideas of Pomian’s later work. Article shows the meaning of revisionism in Polish tradition concerning historiography, and more specifically the meaning of Pomian’s ideas on historiography.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  15. Mary Astell's Machiavellian Moment? Politics and Feminism in Moderation Truly Stated.Jacqueline Broad - 2011 - In Jo Wallwork & Paul Salzman (eds.), Early Modern Englishwomen Testing Ideas. Ashgate. pp. 9-23.
    In The Women of Grub Street (1998), Paula McDowell highlighted the fact that the overwhelming majority of women’s texts in early modern England were polemical or religio-political in nature rather than literary in content. Since that time, the study of early modern women’s political ideas has dramatically increased, and there have been a number of recent anthologies, modern editions, and critical analyses of female political writings. As a result of Patricia Springborg’s research, Mary Astell (1668-1731) has risen to (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  16. Virginity Bias Against Women is Not From The Torah. [REVIEW]Ruth BatYah - manuscript
    This writing is a review of the 3rd chapter of Katherine E. Southwood's "Marriage by Capture in the Book of Judges".
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  17.  32
    Reflections of a Zen Buddhist Nun by Kim Iryŏp. [REVIEW]Eric S. Nelson - 2016 - Philosophy East and West 66 (3):1049-1051.
    Kim Iryŏp was raised and initially educated in a devout Methodist Christian environment under the strict guidance of her fideistic pastor father and her mother, who believed in female education. Both parents died while she was in her teens, and she questioned her Christian faith at an early age. She was one of the first Korean women to pursue higher education in Korea and Japan. Kim became a prolific poet and essayist, her writings engaging cultural and social issues, and a (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  18. Islamist Women's Agency and Relational Autonomy.Ranjoo Seodu Herr - 2018 - Hypatia 33 (2):195-215.
    Mainstream conceptions of autonomy have been surreptitiously gender-specific and masculinist. Feminist philosophers have reclaimed autonomy as a feminist value, while retaining its core ideal as self-government, by reconceptualizing it as “relational autonomy.” This article examines whether feminist theories of relational autonomy can adequately illuminate the agency of Islamist women who defend their nonliberal religious values and practices and assiduously attempt to enact them in their daily lives. I focus on two notable feminist theories of relational autonomy advanced by Marina Oshana (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  19. Nietzsche’s Notebook of 1881: The Eternal Return of the Same.Daniel Fidel Ferrer & Friedrich Nietzsche - 2021 - Verden, Germany: Kuhn von Verden Verlag..
    This book first published in the year 2021 June. Paperback: 240 pages Publisher: Kuhn von Verden Verlag. Includes bibliographical references. 1). Philosophy. 2). Metaphysics. 3). Philosophy, German. 4). Philosophy, German -- 19th century. 5). Philosophy, German and Greek Influences Metaphysics. 6). Nihilism (Philosophy). 7). Eternal return. I. Nietzsche, Friedrich Wilhelm, 1844-1900. II. Ferrer, Daniel Fidel, 1952-.[Translation from German into English of Friedrich Nietzsche’s notes of 1881]. New Translation and Notes by Daniel Fidel Ferrer. Many of the notes have never been (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  20. Kraus on Weininger, Kraus on Women, Kraus on Serbia.Barry Smith - 2003 - In Wolfgang Huemer & Marc-Oliver Schuster (eds.), Writing the Austrian Traditions: Relations Between Philosophy and Literature. Edmonton: University of Alberta Press. pp. 81-100.
    Otto Weininger’s Sex and Character interprets Kant’s categorical imperative in a way which takes it to imply that all human relations, including human sexual relations, are immoral; it is thus in a certain sense impossible to lead a moral life on this earth. We discuss Weininger’s ideas on man, woman, value and intellect, and describe their influence among the Central European intellectuals of his day, including Wittgenstein, and also including Karl Kraus.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  21. Women's Empowerment: The Insights of Wangari Maathai.Gail M. Presbey - 2013 - Journal of Global Ethics 9 (3):277-292.
    This paper will highlight Maathai’s insights regarding empowerment, tracing several important themes in her approach, namely, empowerment’s relationship to self esteem, teamwork, and political action, its ambivalent relationship to formal education, and the role of cultural traditions in providing alternatives to colonial-era cultural impositions and current exploitative effects of neo-liberal capitalism. After reviewing Maathai’s thoughts on each of these topics, I will briefly draw upon other East African thinkers and Africanists’ studies of East African communities to present corroborating evidence for (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  22.  82
    Beyond Adaptive Preferences: Rethinking Women's Complicity in Their Own Subordination.Charlotte Knowles - forthcoming - European Journal of Philosophy.
    An important question confronting feminist philosophers is why women are sometimes complicit in their own subordination. The dominant view holds that complicity is best understood in terms of adaptive preferences. This view assumes that agents will naturally gravitate away from subordination and towards flourishing, as long as they do not have things imposed on them that disrupt this trajectory. However, there is reason to believe that ‘impositions’ do not explain all of the ways in which complicity can arise. This paper (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  23. Kant on Moral Agency and Women's Nature.Mari Mikkola - 2011 - Kantian Review 16 (1):89-111.
    Some commentators have condemned Kant’s moral project from a feminist perspective based on Kant’s apparently dim view of women as being innately morally deficient. Here I will argue that although his remarks concerning women are unsettling at first glance, a more detailed and closer examination shows that Kant’s view of women is actually far more complex and less unsettling than that attributed to him by various feminist critics. My argument, then, undercuts the justification for the severe feminist critique of Kant’s (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   21 citations  
  24. Feminism and Women’s Autonomy: The Challenge of Female Genital Cutting.Diana Tietjens Meyers - 2000 - Metaphilosophy 31 (5):469-491.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  25. Women and the Knife: Cosmetic Surgery and the Colonization of Women's Bodies.Kathryn Pauly Morgan - 1991 - Hypatia 6 (3):25 - 53.
    The paper identifies the phenomenal rise of increasingly invasive forms of elective cosmetic surgery targeted primarily at women and explores its significance in the context of contemporary biotechnology. A Foucauldian analysis of the significance of the normalization of technologized women's bodies is argued for. Three "Paradoxes of Choice" affecting women who "elect" cosmetic surgery are examined. Finally, two utopian feminist political responses are discussed: a Response of Refusal and a Response of Appropriation.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   33 citations  
  26. Mendelssohnian Enlightenment and Women’s Contributions to Philosophy in the Late Eighteenth Century.Corey W. Dyck - manuscript
    When attempting to capture the concept of enlightenment that underlies and motivates philosophical (and political and scientific) developments in the 18th century, historians of philosophy frequently rely upon a needlessly but intentionally exclusive account. This, namely, is the conception of enlightenment first proposed by Kant in his famous essay of 1784, which takes enlightenment to consist in the “emergence from the self-imposed state of minority” and which is only possible for a “public” to attain as a result of the public (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  27.  70
    The Transient Suppression of the Worst Devils of Our Nature—a Review of Steven Pinker’s ‘The Better Angels of Our Nature: Why Violence Has Declined’(2012)(Review Revised 2019).Michael Starks - 2019 - In Suicidal Utopian Delusions in the 21st Century -- Philosophy, Human Nature and the Collapse of Civilization -- Articles and Reviews 2006-2019 4th Edition Michael Starks. pp. 358-363.
    This is not a perfect book, but it is unique, and if you skim the first 400 or so pages, the last 300 (of some 700) are a pretty good attempt to apply what's known about behavior to social changes in violence and manners over time. The basic topic is: how does our genetics control and limit social change? Surprisingly he fails to describe the nature of kin selection (inclusive fitness) which explains much of animal and human social life. He (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  28.  68
    The Passions and Self-Esteem in Mary Astell's Early Feminist Prose.Kathleen Ann Ahearn - unknown
    This dissertation examines the influence of Cambridge Platonism and materialist philosophy on Mary Astell's early feminism. More specifically, I argue that Astell co-opts Descartes's theory of regulating the passions in his final publication, The Passions of the Soul, to articulate a comprehensive, Enlightenment and body friendly theory of feminine self-esteem that renders her feminism modern. My analysis of Astell's theory of feminine self-esteem follows both textual and contextual cues, thus allowing for a reorientation of her early feminism vis-a-vis contemporary feminist (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  29.  32
    Beyond Adaptive Preferences: Rethinking Women's Complicity in Their Own Subordination.Charlotte Knowles - forthcoming - Wiley: European Journal of Philosophy.
    An important question confronting feminist philosophers is why women are sometimes complicit in their own subordination. The dominant view holds that complicity is best understood in terms of adaptive preferences. This view assumes that agents will naturally gravitate away from subordination and towards flourishing, as long as they do not have things imposed on them that disrupt this trajectory. However, there is reason to believe that ‘impositions’ do not explain all of the ways in which complicity can arise. This paper (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  30. Ownership, Property and Women's Bodies.Donna Dickenson - 2006 - In Heather Widdows, Aitsiber Emaldi Cirion & Itziar Alkorta Idiakez (eds.), Women's Reproductive Rights. Basingstoke, UK: Palgrave Macmillan. pp. 188-198.
    Does advocating women's reproductive rights require us to believe that women own property in their bodies? In this chapter I conclude that it does not. Although the concept of owning our own bodies — ‘whose body is it anyway?’ — has polemical and political utility, it is incoherent in philosophy and law. Rather than conflate the entirely plausible concept of women’s reproductive rights and the implausible notion of property in the body, we should keep them separate, so that the (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  31. Caste, Gender and Resistance: A Critical Study of Bama’s Sangathi.K. Navya V. - 2014 - SOCRATES 2 (1):20-27.
    Dalit literature articulates the oppressions and exploitations faced by Dalits in a caste ridden society. Dalit writing as a political form of writing records the cultural and social lives of Dalits and ideologically the writing offers a call for resistance. Bama is a Tamil Christian Dalit writer who writes about the lives of Dalit Women in Tamil Nadu. This paper attempts a look at Bama’s novel Sangathi as a site representing Dalit women and analyses how caste and (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  32.  22
    Review of Mayhew, The Female in Aristotle's Biology. [REVIEW]Thornton Lockwood - 2004 - Bryn Mawr Classical Review 9:19.
    Natural philosophers make mistakes. Descartes got the laws of inertia wrong, Kant misunderstood the primacy of Euclidian geometry, and almost everyone (except perhaps Aristarchus of Samos) prior to the discovery of the telescope mistakenly thought that the solar system was geocentric. That we find Aristotle mistaken on questions in the life sciences — questions which required advances such as the microscope to even articulate — should come as little surprise. There seems nothing remarkable in the fact that Aristotle mistakenly thought (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  33. Women's Pictures: Feminism and Cinema.Annette Kuhn - 1982 - Routledge & Kegan Paul.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  34.  72
    Southern Black Women's Canebrake Gardens: Responding to Taylor's Call for Aesthetic Reconstruction.Joshua M. Hall - 2020 - Debates in Aesthetics 15 (2).
    In this response, I suggest that Black southern women in the U.S. have always been central to the “reconstruction” that Taylor identifies as a central theme of Black aesthetics. Building on his allusions to Alice Walker and Jean Toomer, I explore Walker’s tearful response (in In Search of Our Mothers’ Gardens: Womanist Prose (1983) to Toomer’s Cane (2011). Walker identifies their mothers’ and grandmothers’ informal arts of storytelling and gardening as the hidden roots of both her and Toomer’s work. I (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  35. Reading Transgender, Rethinking Women's Studies.Cressida J. Heyes - 2000 - National Women's Studies Association Journal 12 (2):170-180.
    Representing the best popular and scholarly contributions to transgender/ sex studies, and with their mutual concern with female-to-male sex and gender crossing (among other topics), these three books mark an important shift in scholarship on gender and sexuality. Trans studies has reached a level of autonomy and sophistication that firmly establishes it as a field with its own theoretical and political questions. Of course, connections to feminist and queer theory are still very apparent in these texts, and all three authors (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  36. Postcolonial Ambivalence and Phenomenological Ambiguity: Towards Recognizing Asian American Women's Agency.Emily S. Lee - 2016 - Critical Philosophy of Race 4 (1):56.
    Homi Bhabha brings attention to the figure of the post-colonial metropolitan subject—a third world subject who resides in the first world. Bhabha describes the experiences of the “colonial” subject as ambivalently split. As much as I find his work insightful, I find problematic Bhabha’s descriptions of the daily life of post-colonial metropolitan subjects as split and doubled. His analysis lends only to the possibility of these splittings/doublings as schizophrenically wholly arising. His analysis cannot account for the agonistic moments when the (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  37. Custom Freedom and Equality: Mary Astell on Marriage and Women's Education.Karen Detlefsen - 2016 - In Penny Weiss & Alice Sowaal (eds.), Feminist Interpretations of Mary Astell. Pennsylvania State University Press. pp. 74-92.
    Whatever may be said about contemporary feminists’ evaluation of Descartes’ role in the history of feminism, Mary Astell herself believed that Descartes’ philosophy held tremendous promise for women. His urging all people to eschew the tyranny of custom and authority in order to uncover the knowledge that could be found in each one of our unsexed souls potentially offered women a great deal of intellectual and personal freedom and power. Certainly Astell often read Descartes in this way, and Astell herself (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  38. Rough, Foul-Mouthed Boys: Women’s Monstrous Laboring Bodies.Amy E. Wendling - 2007 - Radical Philosophy Today 5:49-67.
    Karl Marx claims that alienation inheres in all wage labor. I raise questions about the applicability of this claim to subjects of patriarchy. In the first section, I discuss industrial wage labor and its allure for women who were trying to escape the norms of familial patriarchy. In the second section, I extend this criticism of Marx’s claim by considering the racially enslaved subjects of the Antebellum American South, for whom economicallyrecognized wage labor was still a bloody political battle. Finally, (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  39. Against Raunchy Women's Art.Cynthia Freeland - 2009 - In Curtis Carter (ed.), Art and Social Change. International Association for Aesthetics. pp. 56-72.
    This article criticizes what I call "Raunchy" feminist art by employing discussions of pornography and objectification from Eaton and Nussbaum. Artists considered include Carolee Schneeman, Cindy Sherman, Lisa Yuskavage, and Jenny Saville. The article includes by citing examples of feminist art dealing with erotic material in a more productive manner: Eija-Liisa Ahtila, Kiki Smith, and Marlene Dumas.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  40.  43
    Thinking of Bhopal: Women’s Bodies as Waste-Sites.Jennifer Scuro - 2008 - International Studies in Philosophy 40 (2):93-105.
    If, as Vandana Shiva has argued it in Biopiracy: The Plunder of Nature and Knowledge (1997), that ‘the new colonies are to be found in the bodies of women, plants and animals,’ then what are the new and not yet evidenced consequences of the efforts to make women ‘a site of passivity and negotiation’? There are little to no intergenerational studies of the impact of the chemical load on reproduction and future generations. The erosion of regenerative power, through exhaustive practices (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  41. Rebuilding the Feminine in Levinas's Talmudic Readings.Hanoch Ben-Pazi - 2003 - Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy 12 (3):pp. 1–32.
    This study presents a reconsideration of Levinas’s concept of the feminine. This reconsideration facilitated by a philosophically informed analysis of Levinas’s Talmudic readings on that subject. The innovation of this research is based on the methodology which combined the two corpuses of Levinas’ writings as important parts of his thought. Two main phenomena are derived from Levinas’ Talmudic readings and arouse main principles of his ethics. In the hearth of the discussion on Eros stated the differentiation of feminine and masculine (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  42.  20
    Sexual Refusal: The Fragility of Women’s Authority.Elinor Mason - forthcoming - Hypatia.
    I expand on and defend a particular account of silencing that has been identified by Mary Kate McGowan. She suggests that one sort of silencing occurs when men do not think that women have the authority to refuse. I develop this proposal, arguing that it is usefully distinct from other forms of silencing, which attribute a radical misunderstanding to the perpetrator. Authority silencing, by contrast, allows that the perpetrator understands that the woman is trying to refuse. I examine the nature (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  43.  52
    Pre-College Causes of Women's Underrepresentation in Philosophy.Christopher Dobbs - 2015 - Dissertation, Georgia State University
    Recent work on women’s underrepresentation in philosophy has focused on a distinction between “in class” and “pre-university” effects as the primary cause of women’s underrepresentation in philosophy. This paper reports from a large dataset from the Cooperative Institutional Research Program that shows that, of the American students that intended to major in philosophy before they started college, about two-thirds are men. This lends credence to the pre-university effects explanation for women’s underrepresentation in philosophy. This paper will discuss (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  44.  26
    The Pattern of Women's Reliance on Family Planning Providers in Egypt.Hassan H. M. Zaky - manuscript
    Understanding choice of family planning provider is fundamental for policy makers and program managers as they seek ways to both improve the coverage and increase the sustainability and efficiency of family planning services for Egypt to achieve its population objectives. This study focuses first on providing a descriptive profile of the patterns of reliance on sources of family planning services during the early 2000s. Binomial logit models are then estimated to obtain a more in depth understanding of the determinants of (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  45.  57
    The Conflict of Interpretations as an Essential Epistemological Tool for Women’s Studies.Fernanda Henriques - 2019 - Critical Hermeneutics 3:109-134.
    This paper aims to show how Paul Ricoeur's hermeneutics, namely in the specificity of the Conflict of interpretations category, is a fruitful resource in the constitution of Women's Studies as well as to legitimize the need for its full integration in the canons of humanistic knowledge. In general, they continue to ignore the immense body of knowledge and perspectives that Women's Studies have produced in recent decades. In this sense, it begins by presenting the general features of the hermeneutic problematic (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  46. Research, Teaching and Service: Why Shouldn't Women's Work Count?Shelley M. Park - 1996 - Journal of Higher Education 67 (1):46-84.
    This article examines one way institutionalized sexism operates in the university setting by examining the gender roles and gender hierarchies implicit in (allegedly gender-neutral) university tenure and promotion policies. Current working assumptions regarding (1) what constitutes good research, teaching, and service and (2) the relative importance of each of these endeavors reflect and perpetuate masculine values and practices, thus preventing the professional advancement of female faculty both individually and collectively. A gendered division of labor exists within (as outside) the contemporary (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  47.  38
    Intense Embodiment: Senses of Heat in Women’s Running and Boxing.Helen Owton & Jacquelyn Allen-Collinson - 2015 - Body and Society 21 (2):245-268.
    In recent years, calls have been made to address the relative dearth of qualitative sociological investigation into the sensory dimensions of embodiment, including within physical cultures. This article contributes to a small, innovative and developing literature utilizing sociological phenomenology to examine sensuous embodiment. Drawing upon data from three research projects, here we explore some of the ‘sensuousities’ of ‘intense embodiment’ experiences as a distance-running-woman and a boxing-woman, respectively. Our analysis addresses the relatively unexplored haptic senses, particularly the ‘touch’ of heat. (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  48. “Care Drain”. Explaining Bias in Theorizing Women’s Migration.Speranta Dumitru - 2016 - Romanian Journal of Society and Politics 11 (2):7-24.
    Migrant women are often stereotyped. Some scholars associate the feminization of migration with domestic work and criticize the “care drain” as a new form of imperialism that the First World imposes on the Third World. However, migrant women employed as domestic workers in Northern America and Europe represent only 2% of migrant women worldwide and cannot be seen as characterizing the “feminization of migration”. Why are migrant domestic workers overestimated? This paper explores two possible sources of bias. The first is (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  49. An ‘Anti-Utopian Age?’: Isaiah Berlin’s England, Hannah Arendt’s America, and Utopian Thinking in Dark Times.Kei Hiruta - 2017 - Journal of Political Ideologies 22 (1):12-29.
    This essay challenges the influential view that Isaiah Berlin and Hannah Arendt played a central role in inaugurating an ‘anti-utopian age’. While the two thinkers certainly did their share to discredit the radical utopian inclination to portray a political blueprint in the abstract, I show that neither was straightforwardly anti-utopian. On the contrary, both thinkers’ writings display a different kind of utopian thinking, consisting in an imaginative and idealized reconstruction of existing polities. Schematically put, Berlin’s utopia was England reconstructed as (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  50. Bodily Privacy, Toilets, and Sex Discrimination: The Problem of "Manhood" in a Women's Prison.Jami L. Anderson - 2009 - In Olga Gershenson Barbara Penner (ed.), Ladies and Gents. pp. 90.
    Unjustifiable assumptions about sex and gender roles, the untamable potency of maleness, and gynophobic notions about women's bodies inform and influence a broad range of policy-making institutions in this society. In December 2004, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit continued this ignoble cultural pastime when they decided Everson v. Michigan Department of Corrections. In this decision, the Everson Court accepted the Michigan Department of Correction's claim that “the very manhood” of male prison guards both threatens the safety (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
1 — 50 / 996