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Rachel Singpurwalla [13]Rachel G. K. Singpurwalla [1]
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Rachel Singpurwalla
University of Maryland, College Park
  1.  75
    Why Spirit is the Natural Ally of Reason: Spirit, Reason, and the Fine in Plato's Republic.Rachel Singpurwalla - 2013 - Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 44:41-65.
    In the Republic, Plato argues that the soul has three distinct parts or elements, each an independent source of motivation: reason, spirit, and appetite. In this paper, I argue against a prevalent interpretation of the motivations of the spirited part and offer a new account. Numerous commentators argue that the spirited part motivates the individual to live up to the ideal of being fine and honorable, but they stress that the agent's conception of what is fine and honorable is determined (...)
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  2.  70
    Reasoning with the Irrational: Moral Psychology in the Protagoras.Rachel Singpurwalla - 2006 - Ancient Philosophy 26 (2):243-258.
    It is widely held by commentators that in the Protagoras, Socrates attempts to explain the experience of mental conflict and weakness of the will without positing the existence of irrational desires, or desires that arise independently of, and so can conflict with, our reasoned conception of the good. In this essay, I challenge this commonly held line of thought. I argue that Socrates has a unique conception of an irrational desire, one which allows him to explain the experience of mental (...)
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  3. The Tripartite Theory of Motivation in Plato’s Republic.Rachel Singpurwalla - 2010 - Philosophy Compass 5 (11):880-892.
    Many philosophers today approach important psychological phenomena, such as weakness of the will and moral motivation, using a broadly Humean distinction between beliefs, which aim to represent the world, and desires, which aim to change the world. On this picture, desires provide the ends or goals of action, while beliefs simply tell us how to achieve those ends. In the Republic, Socrates attempts to explain the phenomena using a different distinction: he argues that the human soul or psyche consists in (...)
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  4.  97
    Plato's Defense of Justice in the Republic.Rachel Singpurwalla - 2006 - In Gerasimos Xenophon Santas (ed.), The Blackwell Guide to Plato's Republic. Blackwell. pp. 263-282.
    Socrates' aim in the Republic is to show that being just is crucial for happiness. In Republic IV, Socrates argues that the just individual is one in whom each part of the soul or psyche performs its proper function, with the result that the individual attains psychic harmony. Commentators have worried, however, that this account of what it is to be just has little to do with being just in the ordinary sense of the term, which involves acting with regard (...)
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  5.  8
    Soul Division and Mimesis in Republic X.Rachel Singpurwalla - 2011 - In Pierre Destrée & Fritz Gregor Herrmann (eds.), Plato and the Poets. pp. 283-298.
    It is well known that in the Republic, Socrates presents a view of the soul or the psyche according to which it has three distinct parts or aspects, which he calls the reasoning, spirited, and appetitive parts. Socrates’ clearest characterization of these parts of the soul occurs in Republic IX, where he suggests that they should be understood in terms of the various goals or ends that give rise to the particular desires that motivate our actions. In Republic X, however, (...)
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  6.  21
    Colloquium 2 Commentary on Santas: Plato on the Good of the City-State in the Republic.Rachel Singpurwalla - 2015 - Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium of Ancient Philosophy 30 (1):63-70.
    How does Socrates conceive of the good of the city-state in the Republic? Does he conceive of the city as a kind of organic entity, with a good of its own that is independent of the good of the citizens? Or does he think the good of the city includes the good of the citizens. If so, how? Santas argues that the good of the city must include the good of the citizens. Specifically, he argues that the city is organized (...)
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  7.  38
    Ring of Gyges.Christopher W. Morris & Rachel Singpurwalla - 2013 - In Hugh LaFollette (ed.), The International Encyclopedia of Ethics. Wiley-Blackwell.
    Plato’s Socrates holds that we always have reason to be just, since being just is essential for living a happy and successful life. In Book II of Plato’s Republic, Socrates’ main interlocutor, Glaucon, raises a vivid and powerful challenge to this claim. He presents the case of Gyges, a Lydian shepherd who possesses a ring that gives him the power of invisibility. Glaucon’s contention is that Gyges does not have reason to be just in this circumstance, since being just will (...)
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  8.  21
    Are There Two Theories of Goodness in the "Republic"? A Response to Santas.Rachel Singpurwalla - 2006 - Apeiron 39 (4):319-330.
    It is well known that Socrates sketches, through his similes of the sun, line, and cave, an account of the form of the good in the middle books of the Republic and that this conception of the good relies heavily on his theory of forms. What is less well-noted is that Socrates presents a distinct account of goodness - a functional account - in Republic I. In numerous influential articles, Gerasimos Santas has presented an interpretation of Plato's two theories of (...)
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  9.  59
    City and Soul in Plato’s Republic, by G.R.F. Ferrari. [REVIEW]Rachel Singpurwalla - 2007 - Ancient Philosophy 27 (1):174-179.
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  10.  3
    Commentary on Vallejo: The Ontology of False Pleasures in the Philebus.Rachel Singpurwalla - 2009 - Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium of Ancient Philosophy 24:75-80.
    In his rich and suggestive paper, Alvaro Vallejo argues for the novel thesis that Plato posits a form of pleasure in the Republic and the Philebus. Vallejo argues that the notion of a Platonic form of pleasure best explains other things that Plato says about pleasure. First, Plato draws a distinction between true pleasure and the appearance of pleasure. Second, Plato uses the same language to describe the relationship between forms and their inferior instantiations as he uses to describe the (...)
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  11.  45
    Gender and Rhetoric in Plato’s Political Thought, by Michael Kochin. [REVIEW]Rachel G. K. Singpurwalla - 2004 - Ancient Philosophy 24 (2):470-474.
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  12.  24
    Plato as Critical Theorist, by Jonny Thakkar. [REVIEW]Rachel Singpurwalla - 2021 - Philosophical Review 130 (1):145-149.
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  13.  23
    Socratic Virtue: Making the Best of the Neither-Good-Nor-Bad, by Naomi Reshotko. [REVIEW]Rachel Singpurwalla - 2008 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 128:276-277.
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  14.  15
    Plato and the Tripartition of Soul.Rachel Singpurwalla - 2019 - In Philosophy of Mind in Antiquity: History of Philosophy of Mind, Volume 1. pp. 101-119.
    In the Republic, Phaedrus, and Timaeus, Socrates holds that the psyche is complex, or has three distinct and semi-autonomous sources of motivation, which he calls the reasoning, spirited, and appetitive parts. While the rational part determines what is best overall and motivates us to pursue it, the spirited and appetitive parts incline us toward different objectives, such as victory, honor, and esteem, or the satisfaction of our desires for food, drink, and sex. While it is obvious that Socrates primarily characterizes (...)
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