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  1. Integration and Reaction.Ronald R. Sundstrom - 2023 - Dialogue 62 (1):77-83.
    D. C. Matthew argues that although integration offers blacks social and economic benefits, it also creates the conditions for phenotypic devaluation that leads to harm against black self-worth and servile behavior. Therefore, he advises against integration because the resulting self-worth harms outweigh the benefits of integration. I argue that Matthew’s cost-benefit calculation against integration lacks the requisite evidence, and amounts to a luxury belief that will result in more harm. Moreover, his interpretation of behavior — which he construes as being (...)
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  2. Cities After COVID: Ten philosophers consider how COVID has impacted the life of the city.Ian Olasov, Michael Menser, Jennifer Gammage, Eduardo Souza dos Santos, John Rennie Short, Kenny Easwaran, Ronald R. Sundstrom, Irfan Khawaja, Quill R. Kukla & Katherine Melcher - 2022 - The Philosophers' Magazine.
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  3. Residential Segregation and Rethinking the Imperative of Integration.Ronald R. Sundstrom - 2019 - In Joseph S. Biehl, Samantha Noll & Sharon M. Meagher (eds.), The Routledge Handbook of the Philosophy of the City. London, UK: Routledge. pp. 216–228.
    In this chapter I consider the place of the topic of racial and ethnic urban residential segregation factors into political philosophy. I begin with a short history of residential segregation and the ghetto, and their role in systems of racial domination and oppression, and remarks on the general neglect of this topic in contemporary political philosophy, including in nonideal political philosophy, which proports to take on examples of real-world injustices and inequalities. I then examine, from the standpoint of liberal-egalitarian political (...)
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