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  1.  69
    'When You (Say You) Know, You Can't Be Wrong': J.L. Austin on 'I Know' Claims.Sabina Vaccarino Bremner - forthcoming - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy.
    In ‘Other Minds’, J.L. Austin advances a parallel between saying ‘I know’ and saying ‘I promise’: much as you are ‘prohibited’, he says, from saying ‘I promise I will, but I may fail’, you are also ‘prohibited’ from saying ‘I know it is so, but I may be wrong’. This treatment of ‘I know’ has been derided for nearly sixty years: while saying ‘I promise’ amounts to performing the act of promising, Austin seems to miss the fact that saying ‘I (...)
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  2. Anthropology as Critique: Foucault, Kant, and the Metacritical Tradition.Sabina Vaccarino Bremner - forthcoming - British Journal for the History of Philosophy.
    While increasing attention has been paid in recent years to the relation between Foucault’s conception of critique and Kant’s, much controversy remains over whether Foucault’s most sustained early engagement with Kant, his dissertation on Kant’s Anthropology, should be read as a wholesale rejection of Kant’s views or as the source of Foucault’s late return to ethics and critique. In this paper, I propose a new reading of the dissertation, considering it alongside 1950s-era archival materials of which I advance the first (...)
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  3.  31
    'Until Art Once More Becomes Nature': Culture and the Unity of Kant's Critique of Judgment.Sabina Vaccarino Bremner - forthcoming - Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie.
    Commentators have turned increasing attention to the question of how the two halves of the Critique of Judgment fit together. Yet Kant’s account of culture has so far gone overlooked, despite the role it plays in both parts of the work in answering what Kant situates in the Introduction as the work's guiding concern: how the power of judgment thinks the transition between nature and freedom. Teleological judgment posits culture as the last empirically cognizable telos of nature prior to human (...)
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