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  1. Feminist Philosophy of Disability: A Genealogical Intervention.Shelley L. Tremain - 2019 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 57 (1):132-158.
    This article is a feminist intervention into the ways that disability is researched and represented in philosophy at present. Nevertheless, some of the claims that I make over the course of the article are also pertinent to the marginalization in philosophy of other areas of inquiry, including philosophy of race, feminist philosophy more broadly, indigenous philosophies, and LGBTQI philosophy. Although the discipline of philosophy largely continues to operate under the guise of neutrality, rationality, and objectivity, the institutionalized structure of the (...)
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    Introduction: Philosophies of Disability and the Global Pandemic.Shelley L. Tremain - 2021 - International Journal of Critical Diversity Studies 4 (1):6-9.
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    Philosophy of Disability, Conceptual Engineering, and the Nursing Home-Industrial-Complex in Canada.Shelley L. Tremain - 2021 - International Journal of Critical Diversity Studies 4 (1):10-33.
    ABSTRACT In this article, I indicate how the naturalized and individualized conception of disability that prevails in philosophy informs the indifference of philosophers to the predictable COVID-19 tragedy that has unfolded in nursing homes, supported living centers, psychiatric institutions, and other institutions in which elders and younger disabled people are placed. I maintain that, insofar as feminist and other discourses represent these institutions as sites of care and love, they enact structural gaslighting. I argue, therefore, that philosophers must engage in (...)
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    Philosophy of Disability, Conceptual Engineeering, and the Nursing Home-Industrial-Complex in Canada.Shelley L. Tremain - 2021 - International Journal of Critical Diversity Studies 4 (1):10-33.
    In this article, I indicate how the naturalized and individualized conception of disability that prevails in philosophy informs the indifference of philosophers to the predictable COVID-19 tragedy that has unfolded in nursing homes, supported living centers, psychiatric institutions, and other institutions in which elders and younger disabled people are placed. I maintain that, insofar as feminist and other discourses represent these institutions as sites of care and love, they enact structural gaslighting. I argue, therefore, that philosophers must engage in conceptual (...)
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