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Simon B. Duffy
Yale-NUS College
  1. Spinoza Today: The Current State of Spinoza Scholarship.Simon B. Duffy - 2009 - Intellectual History Review 19 (1):111-132.
    What I plan to do in this paper is to provide a survey of the ways in which Spinoza’s philosophy has been deployed in relation to early modern thought, in the history of ideas and in a number of different domains of contemporary philosophy, and to offer an account of how some of this research has developed. The past decade of research in Spinoza studies has been characterized by a number of tendencies; however, it is possible to identify four main (...)
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  2.  32
    Review of Michael Hunter, The Boyle Papers: Understanding the Manuscripts of Robert Boyle (Ashgate, 2007). [REVIEW]Simon B. Duffy - 2008 - Reviews in the Enlightenment 1.
    Michael Hunter, The Boyle Papers: Understanding the Manuscripts of Robert Boyle. With contributions by Edward B. Davis, Harriet Knight, Charles Littleton and Lawrence M. Principe. Aldershot, England; Burlington, VT: Ashgate, 2007. Pp. xiii + 674. US$139.95/£70.00 HB. -/- The publication by Michael Hunter of this revised edition of the catalogue of the Boyle Papers contributes admirably to the renaissance in Boyle studies which has taken place over the past decade and a half. Robert Boyle (1627–91), arguably the most influential British (...)
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    Review of Michiel Wielema’s The March of the Libertines. Spinozists and the Dutch Reformed Church (1660 – 1750) (Verloren, 2004). [REVIEW]Simon B. Duffy - 2006 - Journal of Religious History 30 (1):122-3.
    Michiel Wielema: The March of the Libertines. Spinozists and the Dutch Reformed Church (1660–1750). ReLiC: Studies in Dutch Religious History. Hilversum: Uitgeverij Verloren, 2004; pp. 221. The Dutch Republic of the seventeenth century is famous for having cultivated an extraordinary climate of toleration and religious pluralism — the Union of Utrecht supported religious freedom, or “freedom of conscience”, and expressly forbade reli- gious inquisition. However, despite membership in the state sponsored Calvinist Dutch Reformed Church not being compulsory, the freedom to (...)
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