15 found
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  1. The Relational Care Framework: Promoting Continuity or Maintenance of Selfhood in Person-Centered Care.Matthew Tieu & Steve Matthews - 2023 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy (1):85-101.
    We argue that contemporary conceptualizations of “persons” have failed to achieve the moral goals of “person-centred care” (PCC, a model of dementia care developed by Tom Kitwood) and that they are detrimental to those receiving care, their families, and practitioners of care. We draw a distinction between personhood and selfhood, pointing out that continuity or maintenance of the latter is what is really at stake in dementia care. We then demonstrate how our conceptualization, which is one that privileges the lived (...)
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  2.  66
    The Significance of Habit.Steve Matthews - forthcoming - New Content is Available for Journal of Moral Philosophy.
    _ Source: _Page Count 22 Analysis of the concept of habit has been relatively neglected in the contemporary analytic literature. This paper is an attempt to rectify this lack. The strategy begins with a description of some paradigm cases of habit which are used to derive five features as the basis for an explicative definition. It is argued that habits are social, acquired through repetition, enduring, environmentally activated, and automatic. The enduring nature of habits is captured by their being dispositions (...)
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  3.  97
    Truthfulness and Sense-Making: Two Modes of Respect for Agency.Jeanette Kennett & Steve Matthews - 2024 - Journal of Philosophy 121 (2):61-88.
    According to a Kantian conception truthfulness is characterised as a requirement of respect for the agency of another. In lying we manipulate the other’s rational capacities to achieve ends we know or fear they may not share. This is paradigmatically a failure of respect. In this paper we argue that the importance of truthfulness also lies in significant part in the ways in which it supports our agential need to make sense of the world, other people, and ourselves. Since sense-making (...)
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  4. Why should HCWs receive priority access to vaccines in a pandemic?Xavier Symons, Steve Matthews & Bernadette Tobin - 2021 - BMC Medical Ethics 22 (1):1-9.
    BackgroundViral pandemics present a range of ethical challenges for policy makers, not the least among which are difficult decisions about how to allocate scarce healthcare resources. One important question is whether healthcare workers should receive priority access to a vaccine in the event that an effective vaccine becomes available. This question is especially relevant in the coronavirus pandemic with governments and health authorities currently facing questions of distribution of COVID-19 vaccines.Main textIn this article, we critically evaluate the most common ethical (...)
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  5.  19
    Dignity and exclusion.Steve Matthews - 2022 - Journal of Medical Ethics 48 (12):974-974.
    Soofi1 aims to develop an account of dignity in dementia care based on Nussbaum’s capabilities approach. He does this by drawing on the Kitwood and Bredin2 list of well-being indicators, in order to fill out her account of human flourishing to cover aspects such as practical reasoning that appear beyond the reach of those with relatively severe dementia. As Soofi points out, Nussbaum’s claim that such lost abilities can be compensated through guardianship measures is implausible. He asserts in response that (...)
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  6. Music Therapy and Dementia: Rethinking the Debate Over Advance Directives.Steve Matthews - 2014 - Ethics Education 20:18-35.
    Ronald Dworkin argued that Advance Directives informed by a principle of autonomy ought to guide decisions in relation to the treatment of those in care for dementia. The principle of autonomy in play presupposes a form of competence that is tied to the individual person making the Directive. This paper challenges this individualist assumption. It does so by pointing out that the competence of a patient is inherently relational, and the key illustrative case to make this point is the case (...)
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  7.  30
    Sailing, Flow, and Fulfillment.Steve Matthews - 2012-07-01 - In Patrick Goold & Fritz Allhoff (eds.), Sailing – Philosophy for Everyone. Blackwell. pp. 96–108.
    This chapter contains sections titled: The Key: Losing Oneself Windsurfing Performance, Psychology, and Embedded Cognition Windsurfing and Flow.
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  8.  32
    Addiction, Competence, and Coercion.Steve Matthews - 2014 - Journal of Philosophical Research 39:199-234.
    In what sense is a person addicted to drugs or alcohol incompetent, and so a legitimate object of coercive treatment? The standard tests for competence do not pick out the capacity that is lost in addiction: the capacity to properly regulate consumption. This paper is an attempt to sketch a justificatory framework for understanding the conditions under which addicted persons may be treated against their will. These conditions rarely obtain, for they apply only when addiction is extremely severe and great (...)
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  9.  60
    Establishing Personal Identity in Cases of DID.Steve Matthews - 2003 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 10 (2):143-151.
    In some recent criminal cases in the United States a defense has been mounted based on an affliction known as Dissociative Identity Disorder (DID) (formerly Multiple Personality Disorder). The crux of the defense rests on the proposition that a dominant personality was incapable of appreciating the nature and quality of wrongfulness of conduct caused by an alter personality. This defense has been successful in some cases, but not others, and so philosophers, lawyers, and psychiatrists are now in debate in an (...)
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  10.  51
    The Impact of Dementia on the Self: Do We Consider Ourselves the Same as Others?Sophia A. Harris, Amee Baird, Steve Matthews, Jeanette Kennett, Rebecca Gelding & Celia B. Harris - 2021 - Neuroethics 14 (3):281-294.
    The decline in autobiographical memory function in people with Alzheimer’s dementia has been argued to cause a loss of self-identity. Prior research suggests that people perceive changes in moral traits and loss of memories with a “social-moral core” as most impactful to the maintenance of identity. However, such research has so far asked people to rate from a third-person perspective, considering the extent to which hypothetical others maintain their identity in the face of various impairments. In the current study, we (...)
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  11.  44
    Truthfulness in dementia care.Philippa Byers, Steve Matthews & Jeanette Kennett - 2021 - Bioethics 35 (9):839-841.
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  12.  36
    Respecting Agency in Dementia Care: When Should Truthfulness Give Way?Steve Matthews & Jeanette Kennett - 2021 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 39 (1):117-131.
    Journal of Applied Philosophy, EarlyView.
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  13.  42
    Moral Self-Orientation in Alzheimer's Dementia.Steve Matthews - 2020 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 30 (2):141-166.
    It is ordinarily thought that in Alzheimer's dementia, memory loss leads to a loss of the self. There is a familiar sense in which this is true given that there is, evidently, a close connection between episodic memory and personal identity. This view goes back to John Locke who argued that remembering our own experiences enabled the continuity of consciousness he thought constitutive of personal identity. Locke was also motivated by the idea—to be applied in "forensic" contexts—that continuity of consciousness (...)
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  14.  50
    A Hybrid Theory of Environmentalism.Steve Matthews - 2002 - Essays in Philosophy 3 (1):22-37.
    The destruction and pollution of the natural environment poses two problems for philosophers. The first is political and pragmatic: which theory of the environment is best equipped to impact policymakers heading as we are toward a series of potential ecocatastrophes? The second is more central: On the environment philosophers tend to fall either side of an irreconcilable divide. Either our moral concerns are grounded directly in nature, or the appeal is made via an anthropocentric set of interests. The lack of (...)
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  15.  35
    Parfit's “realism” and his reductionism.Steve Matthews - 2004 - Philosophia 31 (3-4):531-541.
    Though famously Derek Parfit is known for his reductionism about persons, he does, in fact, also profess a form of realism about persons based on the way the language of persons and personal identity is used. We might say that Parfit is an ontological reductionist about persons but not a conceptual reductionist. In this discussion note I try to bring out a difficulty for this kind of hybrid view by showing that there are many ways – too many in fact (...)
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