Results for 'Susan Gelman'

92 found
Order:
See also
Susan Gelman
University of Michigan, Ann Arbor
  1. Differences in the Evaluation of Generic Statements About Human and Non‐Human Categories.Arber Tasimi, Susan Gelman, Andrei Cimpian & Joshua Knobe - 2017 - Cognitive Science 41 (7):1934-1957.
    Generic statements express generalizations about categories. Current theories suggest that people should be especially inclined to accept generics that involve threatening information. However, previous tests of this claim have focused on generics about non-human categories, which raises the question of whether this effect applies as readily to human categories. In Experiment 1, adults were more likely to accept generics involving a threatening property for artifacts, but this negativity bias did not also apply to human categories. Experiment 2 examined an alternative (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  2. On Susan Wolf’s “Good-for-Nothings".Ben Bramble - 2015 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 18 (5):1071-1081.
    According to welfarism about value, something is good simpliciter just in case it is good for some being or beings. In her recent Presidential Address to the American Philosophical Association, “Good-For-Nothings”, Susan Wolf argues against welfarism by appeal to great works of art, literature, music, and philosophy. Wolf provides three main arguments against this view, which I call The Superfluity Argument, The Explanation of Benefit Argument, and The Welfarist’s Mistake. In this paper, I reconstruct these arguments and explain where, (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  3. Review of Susan Haack, Deviant Logic, Fuzzy Logic: Beyond the Formalism[REVIEW]Achille C. Varzi - 1998 - Philosophical Review 107 (3):468-471.
    Book information: Deviant Logic, Fuzzy Logic: Beyond The Formalism. By SUSAN HAACK. Chicago, Ill.: University of Chicago Press, 1996. Pp. xxvi, 291.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  4. Susan Stebbing, Incomplete Symbols and Foundherentist Meta-Ontology.Frederique Janssen-Lauret - 2017 - Journal for the History of Analytical Philosophy 5 (2):6-17.
    Susan Stebbing’s work on incomplete symbols and analysis was instrumental in clarifying, sharpening, and improving the project of logical constructions which was pivotal to early analytic philosophy. She dispelled use-mention confusions by restricting the term ‘incomplete symbol’ to expressions eliminable through analysis, rather than those expressions’ purported referents, and distinguished linguistic analysis from analysis of facts. In this paper I explore Stebbing’s role in analytic philosophy’s development from anti-holism, presupposing that analysis terminates in simples, to the more holist or (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  5. Susan Stuart & Gordana Dodig Crnkovic : 'Computation, Information, Cognition: The Nexus and the Liminal'. [REVIEW]Vincent C. Müller - 2009 - Cybernetics and Human Knowing 16 (3-4):201-203.
    Review of: "Computation, Information, Cognition: The Nexus and the Liminal", Ed. Susan Stuart & Gordana Dodig Crnkovic, Newcastle: Cambridge Scholars Publishing, September 2007, xxiv+340pp, ISBN: 9781847180902, Hardback: £39.99, $79.99 ---- Are you a computer? Is your cat a computer? A single biological cell in your stomach, perhaps? And your desk? You do not think so? Well, the authors of this book suggest that you think again. They propose a computational turn, a turn towards computational explanation and towards the explanation (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  6. Spinoza on Philosophy, Religion, and Politics, by Susan James (Review). [REVIEW]Eugene Marshall - 2013 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 51 (2):318-319.
    Event synopsis: Professor Susan James inverses Leo Strauss’ reading of Spinoza. Whereas Strauss emphasized the hidden subtext of Spinoza’s arguments, James revives the explicit debates of his time within which Spinoza's Theologico-Political Treatise was situated. But this is not a simple historical reconstruction. James’ close reading of the Treatise offers a radically new perspective on Spinoza’s revolutionary book – a reading that presents startling new perspective on the political, metaphysical and theological implications of the book. Given the importance of (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  7. Susan Stebbing's Criticism of Wittgenstein's Tractatus.Nikolay Milkov - 2003 - Vienna Circle Institute Yearbook 10:351-63.
    Susan Stebbing’s paper “Logical Positivism and Analysis” (March 1933) was unusually critical of Wittgenstein. It put up a sharp opposition between Cambridge analytic philosophy of Moore and Russell and the positivist philosophy of the Vienna Circle to which she included Wittgenstein from 1929–32. Above all, positivists were interested in analyzing language, analytic philosophers in analyzing facts. Moreover, whereas analytic philosophers were engaged in directional analysis which seeks to illuminate the multiplicity of the analyzed facts, positivists aimed at final analysis (...)
    Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  8.  89
    Is Consciousness Epiphenomenal? Comment on Susan Pockett.Gilberto Gomes - 2005 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 12 (12):77-79.
    In a provocative article published in the Journal of Consciousness Studies, Susan Pockett argues for the plausibility of considering consciousness as an epiphenomenon of neural activity. This means that consciousness, though caused by the brain, would not in its turn have any role in the causation of neural activity and, consequently, of behaviour. Critical for her argument is the distinction she makes between 'consciousness per se' and 'the neural processing that accompanies it' . In her discussion, though, the author (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  9.  34
    Kites, Models and Logic: Susan Sterrett Investigates Models in Wittgenstein's World.Susan G. Sterrett - 2008/9 - Interview About Book for SimplyCharly.Com.
    This is the text of Dr. Sterrett's replies to an interviewer's questions for simplycharly.com, a website with interviews by academics on various authors, philosophers, and scientists.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  10.  35
    Mounting Frustration: The Art Museum in the Age of Black Power, by Susan E. Cahan, and Museums and Public Art: A Feminist Vision, by Hilde Hein. [REVIEW]Peg Zeglin Brand Weiser - 2017 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 75 (1):91-94.
    These two books challenge museums--the predominant and continually evolving institutions of art delivery--in order to uncover and expose the rampant political biases and hidden strategies that their founders, administrators, and boards of trustees have utilized in order to maintain the preferred status quo of predominantly white male power.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  11. Review of Susan James, Spinoza on Philosophy, Religion, and Politics (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2012). [REVIEW]Yitzhak Y. Melamed - 2012 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews.
    Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  12.  86
    Susan Bordo, Ed., Feminist Interpretations of René Descartes Reviewed By.Karen Detlefsen - 2000 - Philosophy in Review 20 (2):87-89.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  13. Mind Change: How Digital Technologies Are Leaving Their Mark on Our Brains (Susan Greenfield). [REVIEW]Todd Davies - 2016 - New Media and Society 18 (9):2139-2141.
    This is a review of Susan Greenfield's 2015 book 'Mind Change: How Digital Technologies Are Leaving Their Mark On Our Brains'. Greenfield is a neuroscientist and a member of the UK House of Lords, who argues that digital technologies are changing the human environment "in an unprecedented way," and that by adapting to this environment, "the brain may also be changing in an unprecedented way." The book and its author have created a surprising amount of controversy. I discuss both (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  14.  27
    Peirce-Arrow, by Susan Howe. [REVIEW]Cornelis de Waal - 2000 - Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 36 (1):170-173.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  15.  39
    Review Why Grow Up Susan Neiman Prabuddha Bharata October 2016. [REVIEW]Swami Narasimhananda - 2016 - Prabuddha Bharata or Awakened India 121 (10):719-720.
    This book shows the importance of growing up and how childhood and adolescence is overrated. Basing on Rousseau's philosophy Neiman shows us how it is important to understand the deeper aspects of life and to understand philosophy. -/- .
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  16.  94
    Quine on the Nature of Naturalism.Sander Verhaegh - 2017 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 55 (1):96-115.
    Quine's metaphilosophical naturalism is often dismissed as overly “scientistic.” Many contemporary naturalists reject Quine's idea that epistemology should become a “chapter of psychology” and urge for a more “liberal,” “pluralistic,” and/or “open-minded” naturalism instead. Still, whenever Quine explicitly reflects on the nature of his naturalism, he always insists that his position is modest and that he does not “think of philosophy as part of natural science”. Analyzing this tension, Susan Haack has argued that Quine's naturalism contains a “deep-seated and (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  17. Showtime at the Cartesian Theater? Vehicle Externalism and Dynamical Explanations.Michael Madary - 2012 - In Fabio Paglieri (ed.), Consciousness in Interaction: The role of the natural and social context in shaping consciousness. John Benjamins.
    Vehicle externalists hold that the physical substrate of mental states can sometimes extend beyond the brain into the body and environment. In a particular variation on vehicle externalism, Susan Hurley (1998) and Alva Noë (2004) have argued that perceptual states, states with phenomenal qualities, are among the mental states that can sometimes spread beyond the brain. Their vehicle externalism about perceptual states will be the main topic of this article. In particular, I will address three strong objections to their (...)
    Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  18. Review of Evil In Modern Thought: An Alternative History of Philosophy. [REVIEW]Subhasis Chattopadhyay - 2016 - Prabuddha Bharata or Awakened India 121 (1):287-89.
    This review speaks highly of Susan Neiman but laments her lack of fuller treatment of Martin Heidegger.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  19.  73
    Review of Heaven on Earth: The Varieties of the Millennial Experience. [REVIEW]Subhasis Chattopadhyay - 2017 - Prabuddha Bharata or Awakened India 122 (5):480-2.
    Richard Landes is professionally a historian but in this book under review, he is a philosopher of violence; especially genocides and the Holocaust. The reviewer has synoptically read him, Susan Neiman on the one hand and Haruki Murakami and Stephen King on the other hand. The review flows between the history of ideas, philosophy and literary studies since all three are connected to each other.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  20.  73
    Embodied Mind and Phenomenal Consciousness.Venieri Maria - 2015 - Argument: Biannual Philosophical Journal 5 (1):9-24.
    In recent years, a central debate in the philosophy of mind and cognitive science concerns the role of the body in perception and cognition. For many contemporary philosophers, not only cognition but also perception is connected mainly with the brain, where the processing of input from the senses takes place; whereas for the proponents of ‘embodied cognition’ other aspects of the body beyond the brain, including the environment, play a constitutive role in cognitive processes. In terms of perception, a new (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  21. Consequentialism About Meaning in Life.Ben Bramble - 2015 - Utilitas 27 (4):445-459.
    What is it for a life to be meaningful? In this article, I defend what I call Consequentialism about Meaning in Life, the view that one's life is meaningful at time t just in case one's surviving at t would be good in some way, and one's life was meaningful considered as a whole just in case the world was made better in some way for one's having existed.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  22. Bad Apples: Feminist Politics and Feminist Scholarship.Alan Soble - 1999 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 29 (3):354-388.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  23.  97
    A Critical Examination of BonJour’s, Haack’s, and Dancy’s Theory of Empirical Justification.Dionysis Christias - 2015 - Logos and Episteme 6 (1): 7-34.
    In this paper, we shall describe and critically evaluate four contemporary theories which attempt to solve the problem of the infinite regress of reasons: BonJour's ‘impure’ coherentism, BonJour's foundationalism, Haack's ‘foundherentism’ and Dancy's pure coherentism. These theories are initially put forward as theories about the justification of our empirical beliefs; however, in fact they also attempt to provide a successful response to the question of their own ‘metajustification.’ Yet, it will be argued that 1) none of the examined theories is (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  24. Cross-Border Feminism: Shifting the Terms of Debate for Us and European Feminists.Shari Stone-Mediatore - 2009 - Journal of Global Ethics 5 (1):57 – 71.
    Recent decades of women's rights advocacy have produced numerous regional and international agreements for protecting women's security, including a UN convention that affirms the state's responsibility to protect key gender-specific rights, with no exceptions on the basis of culture or religion. At the same time, however, the focus on universal women's rights has enabled influential feminists in the United States to view women's rights in opposition to culture, and most often in opposition to other people's cultures. Not surprisingly, then, feminists (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  25. Contradiction in Motion: Hegel's Organic Concept of Life and Value.Susan Songsuk Hahn - 2007 - Ithaca, New York: Cornell University Press.
    In this analysis of one of the most difficult and neglected topics in Hegelian studies, Songsuk Susan Hahn tackles the status of contradiction in Hegel's ...
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  26. Sculpture and Space.Robert Hopkins - 2003 - In Matthew Kieran & Dominic Lopes (eds.), Imagination, Philosophy, and the Arts. Routledge. pp. 272-290.
    What is distinctive about sculpture as an artform? I argue that it is related to the space around it as painting and the other pictorial arts are not. I expound and develop Langer's suggestive comments on this issue, before asking what the major strengths and weaknesses of that position might be.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  27. Determinism and Luck.Steven M. Duncan - manuscript
    In the course of writing a book on Free Will, I took the opportunity to read a good deal of contemporary literature on the Free Will problem. This paper is a survey and reflection on that reading, responding to the current trends and state of play concerning the existence of free will.
    Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  28.  42
    Hegel and the Problem of Particularity in Moral Judgment.Jeffrey A. Gauthier - 1999 - Women's Philosophy Review 22:58-79.
    Barbara Herman's account of rules of moral salience goes far in explaining how Kantian moral theory can integrate historically emergent normative criticisms such as that offered by feminists. The ethical motives that initially lead historical agents to expand our moral categories, however, are often at odds with Kant's (and Herman's) theory of moral motivations. I argue that Hegel offers a more accurate account of ethical motivation under oppressive conditions.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  29.  8
    Réplica a Ángeles Eraña "Dos explicaciones alternativas del cambio conceptual".Martin Francisco Fricke - 2009 - In Ángeles Eraña & Gisela Mateos González (eds.), La cognición como proceso cultural. México, D.F.: UNAM, Centro de Investigaciones Interdisciplinarias en Ciencias y Humanidades. pp. 91-98.
    Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  30. Rhythm, Evolution and Neuroscience in Lullabies and Poetry.Dustin Hellberg - 2015 - Association for the Study of Ethical Behavior/Evolutionary Biology in Literature 11 (1).
    This paper will attempt a methodological configuration to link the natural sciences (evolutionary theory & neurology) to literature (lullabies and poetry, specifically). It uses findings in neuroscience and animal neurology as well as the theories of evolution by natural selection in to examine patterns in lullabies, and then connect these to poetry. As one will never find a ‘metaphor gene’, nor do genes even code for behaviors –coding instead for traits- is it possible to even locate overlaps between the disciplines (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  31. Performing Dignity.Grace Hunt - 2010 - Women in Philosophy Annual Journal of Papers 6:47-61.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  32.  8
    Review of Moral Clarity: A Guide For Grown-Up Idealists. [REVIEW]Chatterjee Subhasis Chattopadhyay - 2017 - Prabuddha Bharata or Awakened India 122 (10):717-19.
    Moral Clarity is one of those rare works which is trans-disciplinary. This review contextualises Neiman as a philosopher and theologian who performs her cultural work in domains as diverse as memory studies and discourses on the problem of empathy. The review critiques reductionist positions which see Neiman merely as an acolyte of Hannah Arendt.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  33. Good-for-Nothings.Susan Wolf - 2010 - Proceedings and Addresses of the American Philosophical Association 85 (2):47-64.
    Many academic works as well as many works of art are such that if they had never been produced, no one would be worse off. Yet it is hard to resist the judgment that some such works are good nonetheless. We are rightly grateful that these works were created; we rightly admire them, appreciate them, and take pains to preserve them. And the authors and artists who produced them have reason to be proud. This should lead us to question the (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  34. The Objective Attitude.Tamler Sommers - 2007 - Philosophical Quarterly 57 (228):321–341.
    I aim to alleviate the pessimism with which some philosophers regard the 'objective attitude', thereby removing a particular obstacle which P.F. Strawson and others have placed in the way of more widespread scepticism about moral responsibility. First, I describe what I consider the objective attitude to be, and then address concerns about this raised by Susan Wolf. Next, I argue that aspects of certain attitudes commonly thought to be opposed to the objective attitude are in fact compatible with it. (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   21 citations  
  35. Meaningfulness and Time.Antti Kauppinen - 2012 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 84 (2):345-377.
    (Pdf updated to final, slightly revised version of November 2010) -/- Almost everyone would prefer to lead a meaningful life. But what is meaning in life and what makes a life meaningful? I argue, first, for a new analysis of the concept of meaningfulness in terms of the appropriateness of feelings of fulfilment and admiration. Second, I argue that while the best current conceptions of meaningfulness, such as Susan Wolf’s view that in a meaningful life ‘subjective attraction meets objective (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   8 citations  
  36. Assessing Artificial Consciousness.Igor Aleksander, Susan Stuart, Tom Ziemke & Ron Chrisley - 2008 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 15 (7):95-110.
    While the recent special issue of JCS on machine consciousness (Volume 14, Issue 7) was in preparation, a collection of papers on the same topic, entitled Artificial Consciousness and edited by Antonio Chella and Riccardo Manzotti, was published. 1 The editors of the JCS special issue, Ron Chrisley, Robert Clowes and Steve Torrance, thought it would be a timely and productive move to have authors of papers in their collection review the papers in the Chella and Manzotti book, and include (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  37. 5 Questions on Science & Religion.Massimo Pigliucci - 2014 - In Gregg D. Caruso (ed.), Science and Religion: 5 Questions. Automatic Press. pp. 163-170.
    Are science and religion compatible when it comes to understanding cosmology (the origin of the universe), biology (the origin of life and of the human species), ethics, and the human mind (minds, brains, souls, and free will)? Do science and religion occupy non-overlapping magisteria? Is Intelligent Design a scientific theory? How do the various faith traditions view the relationship between science and religion? What, if any, are the limits of scientific explanation? What are the most important open questions, problems, or (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  38. Faculty as Critical Thinkers.Claire Phillips & Susan Green - 2011 - Inquiry: Critical Thinking Across the Disciplines 26 (2):44-50.
    The research presented in this paper used a case study approach to concentrate on the critical thinking preparation and skill sets of professors who, in turn, were expected to develop those same skills in their students. The authors interviewed community college instructors from both academic and work force disciplines. In general, the results of the study supported the researchers’ hypothesis that the ability to teach critical thinking was not necessarily intrinsic to a teaching professional. The authors of this study would (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  39. From Agency to Apperception: Through Kinaesthesia to Cognition and Creation.Susan A. J. Stuart - 2008 - Ethics and Information Technology 10 (4):255-264.
    My aim in this paper is to go some way towards showing that the maintenance of hard and fast dichotomies, like those between mind and body, and the real and the virtual, is untenable, and that technological advance cannot occur with being cognisant of its reciprocal ethical implications. In their place I will present a softer enactivist ontology through which I examine the nature of our engagement with technology in general and with virtual realities in particular. This softer ontology is (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  40. Climate Change and Complacency.Michael D. Doan - 2014 - Hypatia 29 (3):634-650.
    In this paper I engage interdisciplinary conversation on inaction as the dominant response to climate change, and develop an analysis of the specific phenomenon of complacency through a critical-feminist lens. I suggest that Chris Cuomo's discussion of the “insufficiency” problem and Susan Sherwin's call for a “public ethics” jointly point toward particularly promising harm-reduction strategies. I draw upon and extend their work by arguing that extant philosophical accounts of complacency are inadequate to the task of sorting out what it (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  41. Six Signs of Scientism.Susan Haack - 2011 - Logos and Episteme 3 (1):75-95.
    As the English word “scientism” is currently used, it is a trivial verbal truth that scientism—an inappropriately deferential attitude to science—should be avoided. But it is a substantial question when, and why, deference to the sciences is inappropriate or exaggerated. This paper tries to answer that question by articulating “six signs of scientism”: the honorific use of “science” and its cognates; using scientific trappings purely decoratively; preoccupation with demarcation; preoccupation with “scientific method”; looking to the sciences for answers beyond their (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  42. Cognitive Ecology as a Framework for Shakespearean Studies.John Sutton & Evelyn Tribble - 2011 - Shakespeare Studies 39:94-103.
    ‘‘COGNITIVE ECOLOGY’’ is a fruitful model for Shakespearian studies, early modern literary and cultural history, and theatrical history more widely. Cognitive ecologies are the multidimensional contexts in which we remember, feel, think, sense, communicate, imagine, and act, often collaboratively, on the fly, and in rich ongoing interaction with our environments. Along with the anthropologist Edwin Hutchins,1 we use the term ‘‘cognitive ecology’’ to integrate a number of recent approaches to cultural cognition: we believe these approaches offer productive lines of engagement (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  43. Enkinaesthesia: The Fundamental Challenge for Machine Consciousness.Susan A. J. Stuart - 2011 - International Journal of Machine Consciousness 3 (01):145-162.
    In this short paper I will introduce an idea which, I will argue, presents a fundamental additional challenge to the machine consciousness community. The idea takes the questions surrounding phenomenology, qualia and phenomenality one step further into the realm of intersubjectivity but with a twist, and the twist is this: that an agent’s intersubjective experience is deeply felt and necessarily co-affective; it is enkinaesthetic, and only through enkinaesthetic awareness can we establish the affective enfolding which enables first the perturbation, and (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  44.  12
    The Rights of Persons and the Rights of Property.Eran Asoulin - 2017 - Arena 151.
    Mirvac chief executive Susan Lloyd-Hurwitz, not one usually associated with sympathy for tenants on the rental market, said earlier this year that ‘renting in Australia is generally a very miserable customer experience…the whole industry is set up to serve the owner not the tenant’ Her observation is basically correct and the solution she offers is to change the current situation where small investors, supported by generous government tax concessions, provide effectively all of the country’s private rental housing. Lloyd-Hurwitz wants (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  45.  27
    Feminism and Tradition in Aesthetics "Introduction".Carolyn Korsmeyer (ed.) - 1995 - Pennsylvania State University Press.
    Feminism and Tradition in Aesthetics takes a fresh look at the history of aesthetics and at current debates within the philosophy of art by exploring the ways in which gender informs notions of art and creativity, evaluation and interpretation, and concepts of aesthetic value. Multiple intellectual traditions have formed this field, and the discussions herein range from consideration of eighteenth century legacies of ideas about taste, beauty, and sublimity to debates about the relevance of postmodern analyses for feminist aesthetics. Forward (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   11 citations  
  46. Medieval Approaches to Consciousness: Ockham and Chatton.Susan Brower-Toland - 2012 - Philosophers' Imprint 12:1-29.
    My aim in this paper is to advance our understanding of medieval approaches to consciousness by focusing on a particular but, as it seems to me, representative medieval debate. The debate in question is between William Ockham and Walter Chatton over the existence of what these two thinkers refer to as “reflexive intellective intuitive cognition”. Although framed in the technical terminology of late-medieval cognitive psychology, the basic question at issue between them is this: Does the mind (or “intellect”) cognize its (...)
    Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  47. “The Event That Was Nothing”: Miscarriage as a Liminal Event.Alison Reiheld - 2015 - Journal of Social Philosophy 46 (1):9-26.
    I argue that miscarriage, referred to by poet Susan Stewart as “the event that was nothing,” is a liminal event along four distinct and inter-related dimensions: parenthood, procreation, death, and induced abortion. It is because of this liminality that miscarriage has been both poorly addressed in our society, and enrolled in larger debates over women's reproduction and responsibility for reproduction, both conceptually and legally. If miscarriage’s liminality were better understood, if miscarriage itself were better theorized, perhaps it would not (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  48.  97
    Deviant Logic, Fuzzy Logic: Beyond the Formalism.Achille C. Varzi & Susan Haack - 1998 - Philosophical Review 107 (3):468.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  49.  50
    Patient Understanding of Benefits, Risks, and Alternatives to Screening Colonoscopy.Peter H. Schwartz, Elizabeth Edenberg, Patrick R. Barrett, Susan M. Perkins, Eric M. Meslin & Thomas F. Imperiale - 2013 - Family Medicine 45 (2):83-89.
    While several tests and strategies are recommended for colorectal cancer (CRC) screening, studies suggest that primary care providers often recommend colonoscopy without providing information about its risks or alternatives. These observations raise concerns about the quality of informed consent for screening colonoscopy.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  50. Authenticity and Impersonality in Adorno's Aesthetics.Susan Songsuk Hahn - 1999 - Telos: Critical Theory of the Contemporary 1999 (117):60-78.
    The Impossibility of Poetry Adorno's aesthetic theory bears the profound scars of his personal experience of fascism. Even after Auschwitz, he feared that modern bourgeois society is a breeding ground for new forms of fascist terror. It was said that, after Auschwitz, one could no longer write poems. But Adorno insisted that postwar art is an indispensable means for telling the truth about how the social order was fundamentally changed by that catastrophe.1 Not to tell the truth is to be (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
1 — 50 / 92