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  1. Ethical Decision Making in Organizations: The Role of Leadership Stress.Marcus Selart & Svein Tvedt Johansen - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 99 (2):129 - 143.
    Across two studies the hypotheses were tested that stressful situations affect both leadership ethical acting and leaders' recognition of ethical dilemmas. In the studies, decision makers recruited from 3 sites of a Swedish multinational civil engineering company provided personal data on stressful situations, made ethical decisions, and answered to stress-outcome questions. Stressful situations were observed to have a greater impact on ethical acting than on the recognition of ethical dilemmas. This was particularly true for situations involving punishment and lack of (...)
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  2. Employee Reactions to Leader-Initiated Crisis Preparation: Core Dimensions.Marcus Selart, Svein Tvedt Johansen & Synnøve Nesse - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 116 (1):99-106.
    Crisis prevention plans are usually evaluated based on their effects in terms of preventing or limiting organizational crisis. In this survey-based study, the focus was instead on how such plans influence employees’ reactions in terms of risk perception and well-being. Five different organizations were addressed in the study. Hypothesis 1 tested the assumption that leadership crisis preparation would lead to lower perceived risk among the employees. Hypothesis 2 tested the conjecture that it would also lead to a higher degree of (...)
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  3. The Production of Trust During Organizational Change.Rune Lines, Marcus Selart, Bjarne Espedal & Svein Tvedt Johansen - 2005 - Journal of Change Management 5 (2):221-245.
    This paper investigates the relationships between organizational change and trust in management. It is argued that organizational change represents a critical episode for the production and destruction of trust in management. Although trust in management is seen as a semi stable psychological state, changes in organizations make trust issues salient and organizational members attend to and process trust relevant information resulting in a reassessment of their trust in management. The direction and magnitude of change in trust is dependent on a (...)
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  4. Understanding the Role of Value-Focused Thinking in Idea Management.Marcus Selart & Svein Tvedt Johansen - 2011 - Creativity and Innovation Management 20 (3):196-206.
    In a couple of classical studies, Keeney proposed two sets of variables labelled as value focused thinking (VFT) and alternative-focused thinking (AFT). Value-focused thinking (VFT), he argued, is a creative method that centres on the different decision objectives and how as many alternatives as possible may be generated from them. Alternative-focused thinking (AFT), on the other hand, is a method in which the decision maker takes notice of all the available alternatives and then makes a choice that seems to fit (...)
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  5. The Effects of Risk on Initial Trust Formation.Svein Tvedt Johansen, Marcus Selart & Kjell Grønhaug - 2013 - Journal of Applied Social Psychology 43:1185-1199.
    This paper seeks to expand our understanding of initial trust by looking at how variation in risk influences the nature of trust and the process of initial trust formation. Four hypotheses were tested in two experiments involving participants with and without work experience. A first hypothesis suggested a positive relationship between a general propensity to trust and initial trust; a second hypothesis, a negative relationship between risk and initial trust; whereas a third hypothesis posited that risk would increase the importance (...)
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  6. Expanding the Role of Trust in the Management of Organizational Change.Svein Tvedt Johansen & Marcus Selart - 2005 - In Rune Lines, Inger Stensaker & Ann Langley (eds.), New perspectives on organizational change and learning. Vigmostad & Bjørke. pp. 259-280.
    Trust has a great potential for furthering our understanding of organizational change and learning. This potential however remains largely untapped. It is argued that two reasons as for why this potential remains unrealized are: (i) A narrow conceptualization of change as implementation and (ii) an emphasis on direct and aggregated effects of individual trust to the exclusion of other effects. It is further suggested that our understanding of the effects of trust on organizational change, should benefit from including effects of (...)
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  7. Can Intuitive and Analytical Decision Styles Explain Managers' Evaluation of Information Technology?Marcus Selart, Svein Tvedt Johansen, Tore Holmesland & Kjell Grønhaug - 2008 - Management Decision 46:1326 -1341.
    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to clarify how IT managers' decision styles affect their evaluation of information technology. Design/methodology/approach – Four different decision styles were assessed in a leadership test directed towards IT managers. Each style included two dimensions: confidence judgment ability and decision heuristic usage. Participants belonging to each style were interviewed and their answers analysed with regard to their reasoning about central areas of IT management. Findings – Results suggest that a decision style combining intuitive (...)
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  8.  65
    Trusting as Adapting.Svein Tvedt Johansen, Bjarne Espedal, Kjell Grønhaug & Marcus Selart - 2016 - In Søren Jagd & Lars Fuglesang (eds.), Trust, organizations and social interaction. Elgar. pp. 21-42.
    In this chapter, we argue that trust can be better understood in relation to people’s attempts to deal with vulnerability in social interactions. Different situations afford different forms of adaptation that correspond to different forms of trust. We describe three forms of trust: trust as a decision, trust as a performance and trust as an uncontrollable force. We show how these different types of trust differ with respect to assumptions about trust, trustworthiness and agency as well as with respect to (...)
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