24 found
Order:
  1. The Poetic Liberation of Metaphysical Boundaries: Emily Dickinson's 'I am Afraid to Own a Body' as a Lens for Transcending Philosophy and Theology.Wesley De Sena - manuscript
    During the 19th century, Emily Dickinson likely grappled with the intricate philosophical and theological responses to the metaphysical quandary of the body-soul duality. Philosophers constructed their arguments on empirical reasoning, contending that our bodies' existence equates to our existence. The soul, however, presented a challenge in terms of empirical evidence. Conversely, theologians championed the concept of the soul as an explanatory framework for the intricacies of the human mind. Their stance emphasized that just because the soul remains imperceptible does not (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2. Transformative Dimensions: An Analysis of Change and Perception in 'Reuben Bright’.Wesley De Sena - manuscript
    In the poem "Reuben Bright," the speaker initially harbors a prejudiced view of Reuben, a butcher, but this prejudice transforms into awe as the speaker observes Reuben's profound change following the death of his wife. The poem delves into the theme of loss experienced by a wife and the ensuing pain endured by her husband, resulting in a profound and shattering event that triggers significant personal growth. The central focus of the poem lies in the consequential changes that Reuben undergoes (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3. Analyzing Socrates' Four Arguments for the Soul’s Immortality in the Phaedo: Uncovering Informal Fallacies, Clarifying Ambiguities, and Addressing Inconsistencies.Wesley De Sena - manuscript
    In this paper, I contend that Socrates' four arguments for the soul's immortality fail to provide conclusive proof. Instead, these arguments can be seen as attempts to infer the most plausible explanation. However, a closer examination reveals that Socrates' best explanation relies on a sequence of informal fallacies and ambiguities, ultimately resulting in inconsistencies within his comprehensive argument. These fallacies, ambiguities, and inconsistencies will become evident as we delve into Socrates' four arguments for soul immortality in the Phaedo.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4. From Rationalism to Ruin: The Tragic Odyssey of Gustav von Aschenbach in 'Death in Venice’.Wesley De Sena - manuscript
    Thomas Mann's "Death in Venice" is a profound fable, delivering a poignant moral lesson: suppressing one's desires can lead to distortion and an unhealthy, obsessive attachment. This, in turn, may trigger frantic and perverse attempts to obtain the initial object of desire. Aschenbach's inability to confront and satisfy his sexual urges ultimately becomes his undoing. This moral framework enables me to delve deeper into Aschenbach's actions, shedding light on the underlying animal instincts that drive his inner struggle. As a character, (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5. Reevaluating the Nature of Death: A Critical Examination of Feldman's Reconstruction of the Epicurean Argument.Wesley De Sena - manuscript
    In a chapter from his book, "Confrontation with the Reaper," Feldman critiques Epicurus' assertion that nothing inherently negative befalls us after death. However, it is essential to note that the Epicurean argument is more nuanced than Feldman suggests. In this chapter, Feldman undertakes a comprehensive revision of the Epicurean argument, incorporating numerous assumptions supported by evidence to comprehend it. This multiplicity of revisions makes it challenging to trace how Feldman distorts the original Epicurean argument. In this paper, I will endeavor (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6. Re-evaluating the Relationship Between Evil and Slavery: An Integrated Approach.Wesley De Sena - manuscript
    In this paper, I aim to explore the intricate interplay between slavery and the concept of evil, ultimately seeking a deeper understanding of their relationship. While critically evaluating these notions, I posit that solely relying on a historical analysis of contingent acts of evil, as proposed by Steven Mintz in his work "The Problem of Evil: Slavery, Freedom, and the Ambiguities of American Reform," falls short of providing a comprehensive moral perspective on the evil-slavery connection. To enhance the scope of (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7. Transcending Limits: Nozick's Exploration of Meaning and God's Unlimitedness.Wesley De Sena - manuscript
    In the essay "Philosophy and the Meaning of Life," found within the book "Philosophical Explanations," Robert Nozick proposes that the key to comprehending how theistic religions can impart meaning to human existence lies in the concept of God's boundless nature. This unlimited quality is an expansive backdrop, capable of imbuing the comparatively finite lives of theists with profound meaning. Furthermore, Nozick argues that meaningful lives are not restricted solely to the theistic realm defined by God's boundlessness because, paradoxically, God's boundlessness (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  8. The Lectio Principle: Its Significance in Assessing the Viability of a Kashmir Recension of the Bhagavad Gita.Wesley De Sena - manuscript
    In this paper, I delve into the methodologies employed by scholars such as Otto Schrader, Krishna Belvalkar, Franklin Edgerton, and Vishwa Adluri to substantiate the potential existence of a Kashmiri recension of the Bhagavad Gita through the application of the lectio principle. The lectio difficilior, or "harder reading," posits that a more complex and challenging reading in a text is likely to be the older and superior one, as scribes tend to simplify intricate passages into more straightforward forms, known as (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  9. Exploring the Sincerity of the Will: Comparative Analysis of Chu Hsi, Wang Yang-ming, and Śaṅkara.Wesley De Sena - manuscript
    This paper primarily focuses on a pivotal argument within "The Great Learning" between Chu Hsi and Wang Yang-ming. Specifically, this argument revolves around whether one should prioritize investigating things before cultivating the sincerity of will or vice versa. In simpler terms, does genuine sincerity need to precede the exploration of a matter one deeply cares about, or does sincerity naturally evolve due to the initial investigation of the issue? Through thoroughly exploring various issues stemming from Chu Hsi's perspective, I contend (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  10. Reconciling Perception and Dharma: A Vedic Perspective on Time and Knowledge in Kumārila's Philosophy.Wesley De Sena - manuscript
    In Taber's work, "A Hindu Critique of Buddhist Epistemology," Kumārila tackles the concept of perception in MS 1.1.4 and asserts that perception cannot serve as a means to comprehend Dharma. His argument revolves around the idea that perception apprehends objects in the present, while Dharma's outcomes lie in the future. This distinction holds significance because, according to Kumārila, only the Veda can be a valid means of understanding Dharma. However, I contend that the definition of perception presented in MS 1.1.4 (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  11. Exploring the Ontological Conundrum: Vasubandhu's Account of the Self and the Challenge of Comprehensive Functionality.Wesley De Sena - manuscript
    In his work "Treatise on the Negation of the Person," Vasubandhu presents an argument that challenges the conventional understanding of the self, asserting that it can be conceptually and ontologically reduced to the aggregates. This stance is a direct response to the beliefs of Buddhist Personalists, who argue that while a self may be conceptually dependent on the aggregates, it cannot be ontologically reduced to them, as it points to something beyond the aggregates. At the heart of this debate lies (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  12. Dionysus in India: A Multifaceted Examination Across Past and Present Scholarship.Wesley De Sena - manuscript
    In this paper, I argue that the quest for identifying Dionysus' Indian counterpart is a challenging endeavor, one that can only bear fruit when we shift our focus towards understanding Dionysus as a divine force of nature, which manifests in various ways, aligning with the essence conveyed in the Rig Veda verse mentioned earlier. Drawing from Nietzsche's perspective, where he perceives the Dionysian as an inherent force of nature within humanity, it becomes a more plausible hypothesis to establish a connection (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  13. Analyzing Callicles' Great Speech in the Gorgias: Plato's Unveiled Insights from Callicles' Perspective.Wesley De Sena - manuscript
    In this paper, I argue that Callicles presents plausible reasons to accuse Socrates of employing subtle rhetorical maneuvers concerning the concepts of nature and convention. The central focus here is not whether Callicles' accusation against Socrates holds, but rather, it is an exploration of how Plato, through the dialogue between Socrates and Callicles, reveals the compelling rationale behind Callicles' belief in his correctness. Initially, Socrates treats Callicles as a worthy opponent in the conventional sense, engaging in dialectic discourse. However, as (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  14. Exploring Zoroastrian Responses to the Problem of Evil: Seven Philosophical Perspectives on Dualism and Monotheism.Wesley De Sena - manuscript
    Boyd and Crosby's article "Zoroastrianism: Dualistic or Monotheistic?" explores various perspectives on this question. In their work, the authors delve into the dualistic and monotheistic aspects of Zoroastrianism, considering six different responses. These responses are subjected to rigorous philosophical examination, primarily focusing on how they address the challenge of evil. Ultimately, Boyd and Crosby propose a seventh response, which they find more compelling and philosophically robust than the previous six alternatives, aligning more closely with their criteria for rigorous scrutiny. This (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  15. Heidegger's Philosophical Endeavor: A Journey through Plato, Comparative Thought, and Indic Contemplation.Wesley De Sena - manuscript
    In his essay, “The End of Philosophy and the Task of Thinking,” Heidegger proposes the existence of uncharted avenues for intellectual exploration that transcend the confines of metaphysical philosophy. He articulates a more contemplative form of thinking, distinct from the incessant rationalization that permeates traditional discourse, transcending the dichotomy of rational and irrational thought. 2 In typical Heideggerian fashion, this paper lacks a central thesis but embarks on a journey to delve into Heidegger's relentless pursuit of novel modes of thought. (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  16. Sexual Desire and Its Transformation in Schiller’s Theory of Aesthetic Value: An Exploration of Aesthetic Freedom.Wesley De Sena - manuscript
    In this paper, I have constructed one likely relation between Schiller’s views on sexual desire and his general aesthetic value theory. I argue that beauty ennobles sexual desire when one rationally realizes that one did not choose to live in a state solely dominated by sexual desire. By allowing oneself to be in this state of aesthetic freedom, sexual desire grows into affection, and one experiences individual freedom. This thesis results from integrating Matherne and Riggle’s reconstruction of Schiller’s theory of (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  17. Revisiting Jain Syllogisms: Challenging Inferences in the Women's Liberation Debate.Wesley De Sena - manuscript
    In his work on Gender and Salvation, Jaini delves into the intricacies of Digambara arguments and Śvētāmbara objections regarding the possibility of women attaining moksha. At the heart of this debate lies the contentious issue of attire. Both Jain sects acknowledge that Mahāvīra and his early adherent mendicants practiced nudity. However, their perspectives diverge significantly. For Digambaras, the act of going naked is considered fundamental and indispensable in the pursuit of liberation. According to their beliefs, one cannot achieve moksha without (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  18. Callicles' Great Speech in the Gorgias.Wesley De Sena - manuscript
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  19. Short Collection: On Major Works of Islamic Civilizations.Wesley De Sena - manuscript
    Short Papers on Al-bayunniyah's "Principles of Sufism," Hafiz's "Faces of Love," Ibn Tufayl's "Hayy Ibn Yaqzan," and Watt's "Islamic Creeds.".
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  20. Lonely Among Loners: Emil Sinclair’s Existential Coming of Age.Wesley De Sena - manuscript
    Throughout Herman Hesse's "Demian," the strategic use of verbal irony is a powerful tool to shed light on Sinclair's arduous journey in navigating his immaturity and eventual growth. Sinclair's initial hesitancy to confront his callowness is evident as he cautiously explores his evolving sense of self through interactions with friends and family. He often cloaks his true feelings in indirect speech, avoiding confrontations with the consequences of his immaturity. As Sinclair matures, he finds himself straddling the delicate balance between the (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  21. A Plea for Civilized Study and the Study of Civilization.Wesley De Sena - manuscript
    In the late 18th and early to mid-19th century, the secular approach of certain German scholars towards the study of Sanskrit in Europe significantly impacted the creation of the Wales Professorship of Sanskrit at Harvard. This influence stood in stark contrast to the religious concerns of some English scholars. While these English academics were focused on assisting in converting Hindus to Christianity, their German counterparts were pioneering the field of comparative philology. This dynamic led to the establishment of the Boden (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  22. Not Against Interpretation: Krishna, Radha, and the Gopis with a Young Prince.Wesley De Sena - manuscript
    In her 1966 essay "Against Interpretation," Susan Sontag vehemently opposes specific methods of analyzing artworks that reduce them to mere examinations of their content. Sontag contends that interpretation often seeks to inject more meaning into the content than the artwork inherently possesses in its form. Consequently, she argues that interpretations that focus on content tend to devalue the significance of the artwork's form. Sontag asserts that content comprises the artwork's "prescriptive" ideas (12), which serve as a pathway for the viewer (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  23. Contraries and Contradictories: Exploring the Identity and Nature of Conway’s Enduring Creature through Time.Wesley De Sena - manuscript
    In the sixth chapter of her work “Principle,” Anne Conway advances a compelling argument in favor of the soul’s immortality. She posits that the soul, which she defines as an individual's essence, persists through time. It is noteworthy, however, that Conway also asserts elsewhere in her metaphysical discourse that her system does not necessitate the existence of immaterial entities. Consequently, she characterizes the nature of the soul as fundamentally material. This assertion raises a series of intriguing questions and challenges. One (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  24.  98
    "The Religion of the Future" and Vedānta: The Significance of Referring to Primary Sources.Wesley De Sena - manuscript
    In his work "The Religion of the Future," Unger categorizes various philosophical perspectives under the term "Overcoming the World" (hereafter referred to as OW). However, this approach presents a significant issue, as Unger puts forth several metaphysical and epistemological claims about OW without clearly specifying which of these distinct philosophies align with his arguments. Notably, Unger includes Vedānta under the umbrella of OW without distinguishing between two closely related yet distinct traditions within Vedānta: Advaita and Dvaita Vedāntas. This lack of (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark