Results for 'groundwater depletion'

49 found
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  1.  86
    Virtual water and groundwater security.Minh-Hoang Nguyen & Quan-Hoang Vuong - manuscript
    In a recent study by Cai et al. about water shortages in Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei urban areas, virtual water has become the central concept of the groundwater security strategy by suggesting increasing imports of water-intensive agricultural products instead of utilizing the depleted groundwater resources for production. However, despite reviewing the content, we could not see how the authors discussed the households’ economic and financial issues from both production and consumption perspectives.
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  2.  70
    Hoạt động kinh doanh của con người ngốn nước như thuồng luồng.Cao Lương - manuscript
    Một bài điều tra hết sức công phu của Flavell et al., đăng lần đầu trên New York Times ngày 29-8-2023, đang dấy lên mối lo lắng cho tương lai nguồn nước ngầm ở Mỹ. Một hiểm họa môi trường thực sự lớn và hiển hiện chứ không ở đâu xa xôi. Trên thực tế, 90% lượng nước sử dụng giúp biến rất nhiều vùng đất Mỹ trở thành các trang trại, cánh đồng trù phú là nước ngầm. Vấn đề (...)
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  3.  25
    Significance and Brewing Challenges of Civil Society in Affiliating Sustainable Groundwater Resource Governance: Experiences and Perceptions of Bangladesh.Mohammad Rubaiyat Rahman - 2018 - International Journal of Legal Studies and Research (Special Issue):63-82.
    Water is regarded as indefeasible necessity of human civilization. In the South Asia region, the groundwater resource is poised as essence of life, security and development. Bangladesh is not an exception from that. Due to scarcity as well as disproportionate availability of surface water supply, the groundwater resource is veered into vital source to undergird heavy demand of water supply for livelihoods, industrial and agricultural purposes. Considering these, the groundwater resource governance is crucial since it is the (...)
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  4. Socioeconomic Inequalities: Effects of Self-Enhancement, Depletion and Redistribution.Alfred Gierer - 1981 - Jahrbücher für Nationalökonomie Und Statistik 196 (4):309-331.
    Socioeconomic inequalities are functions not only of intrinsic differences between persons or groups, but also of the dynamics of their interactions. Inequalities can arise and become stabilized if there are advantages (such as generalized wealth including “human capital”) which are self-enhancing, whereas depletion of limiting resources is widely distributed. A recent theory of biological pattern formation has been generalized, adapted and applied to deal with this process. Applications include models for the non-Gaussian distribution of personal income and wealth, for (...)
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  5. Effect of Crude Oil on Permeability Properties of the Soil.A. F. Iloeje - 2016 - International Journal of Trend in Scientific Research and Development 1 (1):39-43.
    The impact of crude oil on the permeability of the soil in a non oil producing community in Enugu State was investigated using disturbed A 6 CL soil sample collected from Ibagwa Nike area of the state. The sample was divided into five 5 portions and each of the four 4 portions was dosed with Bonny light crude oil at 2 , 4 , 6 and 8 by weight of the samples. The physical properties of the uncontaminated soil were tested (...)
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  6. The bitter truth about sugar and willpower.Miguel Vadillo - 2017 - Psychological Science:1-8.
    Dual-process theories of higher order cognition (DPTs) have been enjoying much success, particularly since Kahneman’s 2002 Nobel prize address and recent book Thinking, Fast and Slow (2009). Historically, DPTs have attempted to provide a conceptual framework that helps classify and predict differences in patterns of behavior found under some circumstances and not others in a host of reasoning, judgment, and decision-making tasks. As evidence has changed and techniques for examining behavior have moved on, so too have DPTs. Killing two birds (...)
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  7. Sustainable Development Of Renewable Energy: A Case Study In Vietnam.Vu Ngoc Luan, Dao Hong van & Nguyen Duc Duong - 2022 - Journal of Positive School Psychology 6 (8):5833-5838.
    The depletion of fossil fuels, coupled with the growing awareness of the impact of fossil fuel consumption on the global environment, has spurred research activities focused on alternative (or recycled energy). Besides, the demand for energy and related services to meet people's economic and social development, welfare and health is also increasing daily. Therefore, renewable energy is an excellent approach to mitigate climate change and meet the sustainable energy needs of present and future generations future.
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  8. The beauty industry and biodiversity: “The Story of Kindness”.Minh-Hoang Nguyen, Thi Quynh-Yen Nguyen & Quan-Hoang Vuong - manuscript
    Today, many people have realized that the climate change and biodiversity loss issues lie in how and to what extent humans consume products for their lives in the Anthropocene era. Consumerism has pushed natural resource exploitation to its peak, and the depletion of resources is becoming increasingly prevalent. The beauty and personal care industry has a large market and high profits, especially in the high-income segment. However, this advantage also carries the risk of facing scrutiny, investigations, and criticism from (...)
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  9.  95
    Algorithmic Profiling as a Source of Hermeneutical Injustice.Silvia Milano & Carina Prunkl - forthcoming - Philosophical Studies:1-19.
    It is well-established that algorithms can be instruments of injustice. It is less frequently discussed, however, how current modes of AI deployment often make the very discovery of injustice difficult, if not impossible. In this article, we focus on the effects of algorithmic profiling on epistemic agency. We show how algorithmic profiling can give rise to epistemic injustice through the depletion of epistemic resources that are needed to interpret and evaluate certain experiences. By doing so, we not only demonstrate (...)
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  10. A theory of biological pattern formation.Alfred Gierer & Hans Meinhardt - 1972 - Kybernetik, Continued as Biological Cybernetics 12 (1):30 - 39.
    The paper addresses the formation of striking patterns within originally near-homogenous tissue, the process prototypical for embryology, and represented in particularly purist form by cut sections of hydra regenerating, by internal reorganisation of the pre-existing tissue, a complete animal with head and foot. The essential requirements are autocatalytic, self-enhancing activation, combined with inhibitory or depletion effects of wider range – “lateral inhibition”. Not only de-novo-pattern formation, but also well known, striking features of developmental regulation such as induction, inhibition, and (...)
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  11. Anticipating and Enacting Worlds: Moods, Illness and Psychobehavioral Adaptation.Matthew Crippen - forthcoming - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences:1-25.
    Predictive processing theorists have claimed PTSD and depression are maladaptive and epistemically distorting because they entail undesirably wide gaps between top-down models and bottom-up information inflows. Without denying this is sometimes so, the “maladaptive” label carries questionable normative assumptions. For instance, trauma survivors facing significant risk of subsequent attacks may overestimate threats to circumvent further trauma, “bringing forth” concretely safer personal spaces, to use enactive terminology, ensuring the desired gap between predicted worries and outcomes. The violation of predictive processing can (...)
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  12. Self-control, Attention, and How to live without Special Motivational Powers.Sebastian Watzl - 2022 - In M. Brent & Lisa Miracchi (eds.), Mental Action and the Conscious Mind. Routledge. pp. 272-300.
    It has been argued that the explanation of self-control requires positing special motivational powers. Some think that we need will-power as an irreducible mental faculty; others that we need to think of the active self as a dedicated and depletable pool of psychic energy or – in today more respectable terminology – mental resources; finally, there is the idea that self-control requires postulating a deep division between reason and passion – a deliberative and an emotional motivational system. This essay argues (...)
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  13. Recovery of precious metals from e-wastes through conventional and phytoremediation treatment methods: a review and prediction. [REVIEW]Chuck Chuan Ng - 2023 - Journal of Material Cycles and Waste Management 2023.
    E-waste, also known as waste from electrical and electronic equipment, is a solid waste that accumulates quickly due to high demand driven by the market for replacing newer electrical and electronic products. The global e-waste generation is estimated to be between 53.6 million tons, and it is increasing by 3–5% per year. Metals make-up approximately 30% of e-waste, which contains precious elements Au, Ag, Cu, Pt, and other high-value elements, valued at USD 57 billion, which is driving the e-waste recycling (...)
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  14. Fatally Confused: Telling the time in the midst of ecological crises.Michelle Bastian - 2012 - Journal of Environmental Philosophy 9 (1):23-48.
    Focusing particularly on the role of the clock in social life, this article explores the conventions we use to “tell the time.” I argue that although clock time generally appears to be an all-encompassing tool for social coordination, it is actually failing to coordinate us with some of the most pressing ecological changes currently taking place. Utilizing philosophical approaches to performativity to explore what might be going wrong, I then draw on Derrida’s and Haraway’s understandings of social change in order (...)
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  15. Building Communities of Peace: Arendtian Realism and Peacebuilding.Shinkyu Lee - 2021 - Polity 58 (1):75-100.
    Recent studies of peacebuilding highlight the importance of attending to people’s local experiences of conflict and cooperation. This trend, however, raises the fundamental questions of how the local is and should be constituted and what the relationship is between institutions and individual actors of peace at the local level of politics. I turn to Hannah Arendt’s thoughts to address these issues. Arendt’s thinking provides a distinctive form of realism that calls for stable institutions but never depletes the spirit of resistance. (...)
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  16. Vive la Différence? Structural Diversity as a Challenge for Metanormative Theories.Christian J. Tarsney - 2021 - Ethics 131 (2):151-182.
    Decision-making under normative uncertainty requires an agent to aggregate the assessments of options given by rival normative theories into a single assessment that tells her what to do in light of her uncertainty. But what if the assessments of rival theories differ not just in their content but in their structure -- e.g., some are merely ordinal while others are cardinal? This paper describes and evaluates three general approaches to this "problem of structural diversity": structural enrichment, structural depletion, and (...)
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  17. From knowledge to wisdom: a revolution for science and the humanities.Nicholas Maxwell - 2007 - London: Pentire Press.
    From Knowledge to Wisdom argues that there is an urgent need, for both intellectual and humanitarian reasons, to bring about a revolution in science and the humanities. The outcome would be a kind of academic inquiry rationally devoted to helping humanity learn how to create a better world. Instead of giving priority to solving problems of knowledge, as at present, academia would devote itself to helping us solve our immense, current global problems – climate change, war, poverty, population growth, pollution... (...)
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  18. Gabriel Marcel; The impact of Technological Spectating.Alyssa D'Ambrosio - manuscript
    Mystery of Being by Gabriel Marcel depicts the harm of spectating in contemporary society. Marcel describes how spectating rather than participating causes us to lose our sense of being. This essay will show how technology, particularly television, social media, and cell phones, has negatively influenced people's decisions to leave small communities and develop spectating habits. Marcel demonstrates how the yearning for ingatheredness among individuals is depleting as self-centered consumerism rises. This illustrate that this rise is primarily due to the performative (...)
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  19. Studying While Black: Trust, Opportunity and Disrespect.Sally Haslanger - 2014 - Du Bois Review: Social Science Research on Race 11 (1):109-136.
    How should we explore the relationship between race and educational opportunity? One approach to the Black-White achievement gap explores how race and class cause disparities in access and opportunity. In this paper, I consider how education contributes to the creation of race. Considering examples of classroom micropolitics, I argue that breakdowns of trust and trustworthiness between teachers and students can cause substantial disadvantages and, in the contemporary United States, this happens along racial lines. Some of the disadvantages are academic: high (...)
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  20. Structural realism versus deployment realism: A comparative evaluation.Timothy D. Lyons - 2016 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 59:95-105.
    In this paper I challenge and adjudicate between the two positions that have come to prominence in the scientific realism debate: deployment realism and structural realism. I discuss a set of cases from the history of celestial mechanics, including some of the most important successes in the history of science. To the surprise of the deployment realist, these are novel predictive successes toward which theoretical constituents that are now seen to be patently false were genuinely deployed. Exploring the implications for (...)
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  21. Purebred Dogs and Canine Wellbeing.Sofia Jeppsson - 2014 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 27 (3):417-430.
    Breeders of purebred dogs usually have several goals they want to accomplish, of which canine wellbeing is one. The purpose of this article is to investigate what we ought to do given this goal. Breeders typically think that they fulfil their wellbeing-related duties by doing the best they can within their breed of choice. However, it is true of most breeders that they could produce physically and mentally healthier dogs if they switched to a healthier breed. There are a few (...)
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  22. The Addict in Us All.Brendan Dill & Richard Holton - 2014 - Frontiers in Psychiatry 5 (139):01-20.
    In this paper, we contend that the psychology of addiction is similar to the psychology of ordinary, non-addictive temptation in important respects, and explore the ways in which these parallels can illuminate both addiction and ordinary action. The incentive salience account of addiction proposed by Robinson and Berridge (1993; 2001; 2008) entails that addictive desires are not in their nature different from many of the desires had by non-addicts; what is different is rather the way that addictive desires are acquired, (...)
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  23. Is self-regulation a burden or a virtue? A comparative perspective.Hagop Sarkissian - 2014 - In Nancy Snow & Franco V. Trivigno (eds.), The Philosophy and Psychology of Character and Happiness: An Empirical Approach to Character and Happiness. New York, NY, USA: pp. 181-196.
    Confucianism demands that individuals comport themselves according to the strictures of ritual propriety—specific forms of speech, clothing, and demeanor attached to a vast array of life circumstances. This requires self-regulation, a cognitive resource of limited supply. When this resource is depleted, a person can experience undesirable consequences such as social isolation and alienation. However, one’s cultural background may be an important mediator of such costs; East Asians, in particular, seem to have comparatively greater self-regulatory strength. I offer some considerations as (...)
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  24. Autonomy and the Ethics of Biological Behaviour Modification.Julian Savulescu, Thomas Douglas & Ingmar Persson - 2014 - In Akira Akabayashi (ed.), The Future of Bioethics: International Dialogues. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
    Much disease and disability is the result of lifestyle behaviours. For example, the contribution of imprudence in the form of smoking, poor diet, sedentary lifestyle, and drug and alcohol abuse to ill-health is now well established. More importantly, some of the greatest challenges facing humanity as a whole – climate change, terrorism, global poverty, depletion of resources, abuse of children, overpopulation – are the result of human behaviour. In this chapter, we will explore the possibility of using advances in (...)
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  25. The Many Meanings of Sustainability: A Competing Paradigms Approach.Paul B. Thompson - 2016 - In Steven A. Moore (ed.), Pragmatic Sustainability: Dispositions for Critical Adaptation. New York: pp. 16-28.
    Although the word 'sustainability' is used broadly, scientific approaches to sustainability fall into one of two competing paradigms. Following the influential Brundtland report of 1987. some theorists identify sustainability with some form of resource availability, and develop indicators for sustainability that stress capital depletion. This approach has spawned debates about the intersubstitutivity of capitals, with many environmental theorists arguing that at some point, depletion of natural capital cannot be offset by increases in human or social capital. The alternative (...)
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  26. Generation of Biological Patterns and Form: Some Physical, Mathematical and Logical Aspects.Alfred Gierer - 1981 - Progress in Biophysics and Molecular Biology 37 (1):1-48.
    While many different mechanisms contribute to the generation of spatial order in biological development, the formation of morphogenetic fields which in turn direct cell responses giving rise to pattern and form are of major importance and essential for embryogenesis and regeneration. Most likely the fields represent concentration patterns of substances produced by molecular kinetics. Short range autocatalytic activation in conjunction with longer range “lateral” inhibition or depletion effects is capable of generating such patterns (Gierer and Meinhardt, 1972). Non-linear reactions (...)
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  27. Can the World Learn Wisdom?Nicholas Maxwell - 2007 - Solidarity, Sustainability, and Non-Violence 3 (4).
    The crisis of our times is that we have science without wisdom. This is the crisis behind all the others. Population growth, the terrifyingly lethal character of modern war and terrorism, immense differences of wealth across the globe, annihilation of indigenous people, cultures and languages, impending depletion of natural resources, destruction of tropical rain forests and other natural habitats, rapid mass extinction of species, pollution of sea, earth and air, thinning of the ozone layer, above all global warming - (...)
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  28.  80
    Depression, Control, and Counterfactual Thinking: Functional for Whom?Keith Markman & Audrey Miller - 2006 - Journal of Social and Clinical Psychology 25 (2):210-227.
    The present study examined relationships among counterfactual thinking, perceived control, and depressive symptoms. Undergraduate participants, grouped according to nondepressed, mild–to–moderately depressed, and severely depressed symptom categories, described potentially repeatable negative academic events and then made upward counterfactuals about those events. Whereas participants endorsing mild–to–moderate depressive symptom levels generated more counterfactuals about controllable than uncontrollable aspects of the events they described, participants endorsing severe levels of depressive symptoms generated counterfactuals that were less controllable, less reasonable, and more characterological in nature. Furthermore, (...)
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  29. Effects of rainfall intensity on runoff and nutrient loss of gently sloping farmland in a karst area of SW China.Yiwen Yao, Quanhou Dai, Ruxue Gao, Yixian Gan & Xingsong Yi - manuscript
    Nutrient losses from sloping farmland in karst areas lead to the decline in land productivity and nonpoint source pollution. A specially tailored steel channel with an adjustable slope and underground hole fissures was used to simulate the microenvironment of the "dual structure" of the surface and underground of sloping farmland in a karst area. The artificial rainfall simulation method was used to explore the surface and underground runoff characteristics and nutrient losses from sloping farmland under different rainfall intensities. The effect (...)
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  30. Democracy and Anthropic Risk.Petr Špecián - 2022 - Green Marble 2022. Studies on the Anthropocene and Ecocriticism.
    Democracy in its currently dominant liberal form has proven supportive of unprecedented human flourishing. However, it also appears increasingly plagued by political polarization, strained to cope with the digitalization of the political discourse, and threatened by authoritarian backlash. A growing sense of the anthropic risks—with runaway climate change as the leading example—thus often elicits concern regarding democracy’s capability of mitigating them. Apparently, lacking a sufficient degree of the citizens’ consensus on the priority issues of the day, it can find itself (...)
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  31.  90
    United Kingdom’s healthcare corruption in perspective.Sally Serena Ramage - 2023 - The Criminal Lawyer 258 (258):2-24.
    Corruption deprives people of access to health care and can lead to the wrong treatments being administered. Drug counterfeiting, facilitated by corruption, kills en masse. Cases are recorded of water being substituted for life-saving adrenaline and of active ingredients being diluted by counterfeiters, triggering drug-resistant strains of malaria, tuberculosis and HIV. The poor are disproportionately affected by corruption in the health sector, and cannot afford to pay for private alternatives where corruption has depleted public health services. Analysis of corruption in (...)
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  32. Addiction, Compulsion, and Persistent Temptation.Robert Noggle - 2016 - Neuroethics 9 (3):213-223.
    Addicts sometimes engage in such spectacularly self-destructive behavior that they seem to act under compulsion. I briefly review the claim that addiction is not compulsive at all. I then consider recent accounts of addiction by Holton and Schroeder, which characterize addiction in terms of abnormally strong motivations. However, this account can only explain the apparent compulsivity of addiction if we assume—contrary to what we know about addicts—that the desires are so strong as to be irresistible. I then consider accounts that (...)
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  33.  85
    Creative Explorations for a Sustainable Future: Philosophy-Based Creative Drama Workshop Proposal for Children.Güliz Şahin - 2023 - Journal of Human and Social Sciences 6 (Special Issue):616-640.
    “The Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs)”, are a universal call for action, covering targets to be fulfilled by the end of 2030. Many global problems such as global climate change and drought, environmental pollution, depletion of natural resources and biodiversity, inclusive education have evolved into the greatest collective problem of all humanity. It is recognized that teachers, are also responsible for ensuring a sustainable life for future generations and contributing to its sustainability. At this point, there is a need for (...)
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  34. Sokratesowa obrona filozofii. O ospałych i zmęczonych filozofach oraz rozkosznej, żywej i spontanicznej filozofii (Socrates’ defence of philosophy. About the sluggish and tired philosophers and the pleasurable, lively and spontaneous philosophy).Bartłomiej Skowron - 2014 - Studia Philosophica Wratislaviensia 9 (special):33-46.
    Philosophers have no time. They are tired with philosophising. They doze off or even die of fatigue over yet another review, opinion, article, translation of works of an English-speaking philosophical genius, publishing and editing of a book. They are exhausted by the obligatory teaching, bored with listening to conference papers, depressed by defences of post-doctoral theses, hopeless against plagiarism, out-of-breath chasing credits, worn out by English articles, crumpled and ill-treated by institutions, tired with maintaining and co-creating them, jaded by the (...)
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  35. Violence, Wars, and the Possibility of Ethical Life in an Apocalypse: A Kantian Reading of The Walking Dead.Selda Salman - 2021 - Open Philosophy 5 (1):57-66.
    The Walking Dead is a popular TV series depicting a catastrophic and violent world. After a pandemic that turns humans into zombies, we witness the collapse of civilization with all its institutions, the depletion of the resources, and the struggle to build a new world in the middle of the wars between surviving groups. It illustrates a world of literal and metaphorical homo homini lupus. Some people choose sheer survival, and others try to build a moral, civil world. In (...)
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  36. "Else-Where": Essays in Art, Architecture, and Cultural Production 2002-2011.Gavin Keeney - 2011 - Newcastle upon Tyne: Cambridge Scholars Press.
    “Else-where” is a synoptic survey of the representational values given to art, architecture, and cultural production from 2002 through 2011. Written primarily as a critique of what is suppressed in architecture and what is disclosed in art, the essays are informed by the passage out of post-structuralism and its disciplinary analogues toward the real Real . While architecture nominally addresses an environmental ethos, it also famously negotiates its own representational values by way of its putative autonomy ; its main repression (...)
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  37.  69
    The Unity of Science and Transdisciplinarity: A new Agenda to Face Civilizational Problems (2nd edition).Heitor Matallo Junior - manuscript
    The text's objective is to show that the Western scientific tradition, since the pre-Socratics, has as one of its traits the search for a unitary and uni-versal system of knowledge. Since the modern age, many attempts have been directed toward the search for the unification of science, culminating in Neurath's analytical philosophy and efforts in cybernetics. These efforts reflected an epistemological expectation for the unity of science, seeking methods and languages that would allow such an achievement. But such an expectation (...)
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  38. Willpower as a metaphor.Polaris Koi - forthcoming - In Oxford Studies in Agency and Responsibility vol. 8. Oxford University Press.
    Willpower is a metaphor that is widespread in both common usage and expert literature across disciplines. This paper looks into willpower as a ‘metaphor we live by’, analyzing and exploring the consequences of the tacit information content of the willpower metaphor for agentive self-understanding and efficacy. In addition to contributing to stigma associated with self-control failures, the metaphor causally contributes to self-control failures by obscuring available self-control strategies and instructing agents to superfluous self-control efforts.
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  39. “Environmental Justice: A Proposal for Addressing Diversity in Bioprospecting”.Pamela J. Lomelino - 2006 - International Journal of Diversity in Organizations, Communities and Nations 6.
    Recently, there has been an insurgence of corporations that bioprospect in Third World countries (going into these areas in hopes of utilizing traditional knowledge about local natural resources so as to eventually develop a synthetic alternative that they can then market). Although this type of bioprospecting does not encounter the problem of depleting environmental resources, other problems arise. Two primary problems are: (1) determining who has legal ownership of these resources, and (2) who should share in the profits that were (...)
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  40. Heidegger and the infant: A second-person alternative to the Dasein-analysis.Stephen Langfur - 2014 - Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 34 (4):257-274.
    Heidegger’s analysis of human existence has long been criticized for ignoring the full possibilities of human encounter. This article finds a basis for the criticism in recent infancy research. It presents evidence for a second-person structure in our earliest encounters: An infant first becomes present to herself as the focal center of a caregiver’s gazing, smiling, or vocalization. The exchange in which the self thus appears is termed a You–I event. Such an event, it is held, cannot be assimilated into (...)
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  41. Environmental and economic security in the conditions of the Ukraine`s economy.Igor Britchenko, Jozefína Drotárová, Mykola Antonov, Juliia Kholodna, Olena Polonska & Yuliia Popova - 2022 - Ad Alta: Journal of Interdisciplinary Research 2 (12):118-122.
    The article examines the peculiarities and modern specifics of the formation of ecological and economic security in Ukraine in the conditions of digitalization. It was determined that the lack of dynamic growth, the violation of the optimal balance and balance of the ecological and economic system are caused by the depletion of raw resources, a decrease in the overall potential of the environment, and the irrational use of natural resources. It has been proven that in the conditions of digitalization, (...)
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  42. Hinduism and ecology: Its relevance and importance.Justus Onyebuchi Okafor & Osim Stella - 2018 - FAHSANU Journal 1 (1).
    The sustenance of the environment is one of the cardinal teachings of the Hindus tradition and, in this regard, the Hindus tradition points out clearly that a good environment is indispensable for a healthy life. This work seeks to explore some of the fundamental teachings of Hinduism that point to the implications of the relationship between human beings and their environment. For instance, the dharma ecology explains the mechanism for creating respect for nature and the consequences of not doing so. (...)
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  43.  72
    Closed Economies, Autarchy – Failure and Economic Disaster.Darius-Antoniu Ferenț - 2022 - Cunoașterea Științifică 1 (2):46-51.
    Autarchy is an economic system in which the state refuses any commercial connection with the outside, solely relying on its own resources. In an autarchic economy, the state does not participate in the international economic life, is not part of any regional and/or global economic organization and does not export or import goods. The characteristics of a closed, autarchic economy are: 1). the state does not take into account the progress of the world economy, 2). the state lacks involvement in (...)
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  44. Initial thoughts on Greene’s the tragedy of commonsense morality.Ho Manh Tung - unknown
    In his 2013 book, “Moral Tribes: Emotion, Reason, and the Gap between Us and Them,” Joshua Greene1 contemplates two tragedies. The first is the tragedy of the commons, a well- studied problem in the game theory and psychology literature. Here, if people are truly self- interested, cooperation cannot arise, and everyone will use the commons until it is depleted. This problem is succinctly called the “Me vs. Us” problem. The second is the tragedy of the commonsense morality, which Greene named, (...)
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  45.  95
    On the forms of harm stemming from the instrumentalization of large-scale ecosystems.Sarah Isabel Espinosa Flor - 2022 - Transforming Food Systems: Ethics, Innovation and Responsibility.
    One could argue that the use, extraction, and development of natural resources for human purposes, i.e. resource exploitation, constitutes a form of instrumentalization of the ecosystems from which these resources are derived. Moreover, that such instrumentalization may be carried out in a way that has adverse social and environmental impacts. Given that a number of ecosystems are indispensable for the satisfaction of human interests and needs, their instrumentalization may nevertheless be justified. In this context, if the amount and rate of (...)
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  46. On the consistency of Axel Honneth’s philosophy: Methodology, critique, and current struggles for recognition.Marco Angella - 2018 - Philosophical Forum 49 (4):483-509.
    Over three decades, Axel Honneth has developed one of the most fully-structured recognition paradigms in the field of social philosophy. Although it has undergone considerable theoretical changes, this paradigm retains a strong unity. I will analyze it in light of the Frankfurt school critical social theory research program. By so doing, I aim, first, to outline a defense of Honneth’s theory against growing criticisms, which tend to see depletion of its critical insights in his most recent works. Secondly, I (...)
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  47. Neutrality, Nature, and Intergenerational Justice.Britta Clark - 2020 - Environmental Politics 1.
    Suppose the present generation leaves future ones with a world depleted of all the natural resources required for many valuable human pursuits. Has the present generation acted unjustly? According to contemporary theories of liberal egalitarian intragenerational and intergenerational justice, the answer, it appears, is no. The explanation for this verdict lies in the liberal commitment to remaining neutral between different ways of life: many value-laden environ- mental sites and species are not an all-purpose means to any reasonable human end and (...)
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  48. Environmental Concerns in Guru Granth Sahib.Devinder Pal Singh - 2010 - The Sikh Review 58 (3):16-22.
    All the biotic and abiotic factors that act on an organism, population, or ecological community and influence its survival and development constitute its environment. Biotic factors include the organisms themselves, their food, and their interactions. Abiotic factors include such items as sunlight, soil, air, water, climate, and pollution. Organisms respond to changes in their environment by evolutionary adaptations in form and behaviour. At present humanity is facing great challenges for its survival as both these factors have come under great stress (...)
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  49. Why Should One Reproduce? The Rationality and Morality of Human Reproduction.Lantz Miller - 2014 - Dissertation, City University of New York Graduate Center
    Human reproduction has long been assumed to be an act of the blind force of nature, to which humans were subject, like the weather. However, with recent concerns about the environmental impact of human population, particularly resource depletion, human reproduction has come to be seen as a moral issue. That is, in general, it may be moral or immoral for people to continue propagating their species. The past decade’s philosophical discussions of the question have yielded varying results. This dissertation (...)
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