Results for 'human computer interaction'

1000+ found
Order:
  1. As AIs get smarter, understand human-computer interactions with the following five premises.Manh-Tung Ho & Quan-Hoang Vuong - manuscript
    The hypergrowth and hyperconnectivity of networks of artificial intelligence (AI) systems and algorithms increasingly cause our interactions with the world, socially and environmentally, more technologically mediated. AI systems start interfering with our choices or making decisions on our behalf: what we see, what we buy, which contents or foods we consume, where we travel to, who we hire, etc. It is imperative to understand the dynamics of human-computer interaction in the age of progressively more competent AI. This (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2. Distributed Cognition, Toward a New Foundation for Human-Computer Interaction Research.David Kirsh, Jim Hollan & Edwin Hutchins - 2000 - ACM Transactions on Computer-Human Interaction 7 (2):174-196.
    We are quickly passing through the historical moment when people work in front of a single computer, dominated by a small CRT and focused on tasks involving only local information. Networked computers are becoming ubiquitous and are playing increasingly significant roles in our lives and in the basic infrastructure of science, business, and social interaction. For human-computer interaction o advance in the new millennium we need to better understand the emerging dynamic of interaction in (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   77 citations  
  3. Interaction and resistance: The recognition of intentions in new human-computer interaction.Vincent C. Müller - 2011 - In Anna Esposito, Antonietta M. Esposito, Raffaele Martone, Vincent C. Müller & Gaetano Scarpetta (eds.), Towards autonomous, adaptive, and context-aware multimodal interfaces: Theoretical and practical issues. Springer. pp. 1-7.
    Just as AI has moved away from classical AI, human-computer interaction (HCI) must move away from what I call ‘good old fashioned HCI’ to ‘new HCI’ – it must become a part of cognitive systems research where HCI is one case of the interaction of intelligent agents (we now know that interaction is essential for intelligent agents anyway). For such interaction, we cannot just ‘analyze the data’, but we must assume intentions in the other, (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4. The Illusion of Agency in HumanComputer Interaction.Michael Madary - 2022 - Neuroethics 15 (1):1-15.
    This article makes the case that our digital devices create illusions of agency. There are times when users feel as if they are in control when in fact they are merely responding to stimuli on the screen in predictable ways. After the introduction, the second section of the article offers examples of illusions of agency that do not involve humancomputer interaction in order to show that such illusions are possible and not terribly uncommon. The third and fourth (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5. An Analysis of the Interaction Between Intelligent Software Agents and Human Users.Christopher Burr, Nello Cristianini & James Ladyman - 2018 - Minds and Machines 28 (4):735-774.
    Interactions between an intelligent software agent and a human user are ubiquitous in everyday situations such as access to information, entertainment, and purchases. In such interactions, the ISA mediates the user’s access to the content, or controls some other aspect of the user experience, and is not designed to be neutral about outcomes of user choices. Like human users, ISAs are driven by goals, make autonomous decisions, and can learn from experience. Using ideas from bounded rationality, we frame (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   33 citations  
  6.  76
    La computer-mediated interaction: Un modello interpretativo ed alcuni problemi.Luciano Floridi - 1997 - Internet Meeting 1997, Internet and Intranet for CompaniesAt: Centro Congressi Milanofiori, Assago, Milano.
    In this paper, I first outline a model of Computer-Meditated Interaction (CMI) to distinguish between (1) CMI HCI-transparent (HCI = human-computer interaction) and (2) CMI HCI-dependent. Some main features of (1) are then analysed (data-radiation, data-tracking, internalisation of problem solving), while (2) is further divided into (2.1) CMI-HCI stand-alone and (2.2) CMI-HCI on-line. Some advantages and limits of (2.1) are suggested, together with an overview of the present and future strategies leading the production of new (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7. Human-Aided Artificial Intelligence: Or, How to Run Large Computations in Human Brains? Towards a Media Sociology of Machine Learning.Rainer Mühlhoff - 2019 - New Media and Society 1.
    Today, artificial intelligence, especially machine learning, is structurally dependent on human participation. Technologies such as Deep Learning (DL) leverage networked media infrastructures and human-machine interaction designs to harness users to provide training and verification data. The emergence of DL is therefore based on a fundamental socio-technological transformation of the relationship between humans and machines. Rather than simulating human intelligence, DL-based AIs capture human cognitive abilities, so they are hybrid human-machine apparatuses. From a perspective of (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  8.  85
    Three Patterns to Support Empathy in Computer-Mediated Human Interaction.Michael Lyons & Daniel Kluender - 2020 - arXiv 2011:1-6.
    We present three patterns for computer-mediated interaction which we discovered during the design and development of a platform for remote teaching and learning of kanji, the Chinese characters used in written Japanese. Our aim in developing this system was to provide a basis for embodiment in remote interaction, and in particular to support the experience of empathy by both teacher and student. From this study, the essential elements are abstracted and suggested as design patterns for other (...)-mediated interaction systems. (shrink)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  9. Just consequentialism and computing.James H. Moor - 1999 - Ethics and Information Technology 1 (1):61-65.
    Computer and information ethics, as well as other fields of applied ethics, need ethical theories which coherently unify deontological and consequentialist aspects of ethical analysis. The proposed theory of just consequentialism emphasizes consequences of policies within the constraints of justice. This makes just consequentialism a practical and theoretically sound approach to ethical problems of computer and information ethics.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   19 citations  
  10. Interactivity and multimedia interfaces.David Kirsh - 1997 - Instructional Science 25:79-96.
    Multimedia technology offers instructional designers an unprecedented opportunity to create richly interactive learning environments. With greater design freedom comes complexity. The standard answer to the problems of too much choice, disorientation, and complex navigation is thought to lie in the way we design interactivity in a system. Unfortunately, the theory of interactivity is at an early state of development. After critiquing the decision cycle model of interaction—the received theory in human computer interaction—I present arguments and observational (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  11. Information ethics: on the philosophical foundation of computer ethics.Luciano Floridi - 1999 - Ethics and Information Technology 1 (1):33–52.
    The essential difficulty about Computer Ethics' (CE) philosophical status is a methodological problem: standard ethical theories cannot easily be adapted to deal with CE-problems, which appear to strain their conceptual resources, and CE requires a conceptual foundation as an ethical theory. Information Ethics (IE), the philosophical foundational counterpart of CE, can be seen as a particular case of environmental ethics or ethics of the infosphere. What is good for an information entity and the infosphere in general? This is the (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   111 citations  
  12. Reasons for Meaningful Human Control.Herman Veluwenkamp - 2022 - Ethics and Information Technology 24 (4):1-9.
    ”Meaningful human control” is a term invented in the political and legal debate on autonomous weapons system, but it is nowadays also used in many other contexts. It is supposed to specify conditions under which an artificial system is under the right kind of control to avoid responsibility gaps: that is, situations in which no moral agent is responsible. Santoni de Sio and Van den Hoven have recently suggested a framework that can be used by system designers to operationalize (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  13. Human achievement and artificial intelligence.Brett Karlan - 2023 - Ethics and Information Technology 25 (3):1-12.
    In domains as disparate as playing Go and predicting the structure of proteins, artificial intelligence (AI) technologies have begun to perform at levels beyond which any humans can achieve. Does this fact represent something lamentable? Does superhuman AI performance somehow undermine the value of human achievements in these areas? Go grandmaster Lee Sedol suggested as much when he announced his retirement from professional Go, blaming the advances of Go-playing programs like AlphaGo for sapping his will to play the game (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  14. Algorithm exploitation: humans are keen to exploit benevolent AI.Jurgis Karpus, Adrian Krüger, Julia Tovar Verba, Bahador Bahrami & Ophelia Deroy - 2021 - iScience 24 (6):102679.
    We cooperate with other people despite the risk of being exploited or hurt. If future artificial intelligence (AI) systems are benevolent and cooperative toward us, what will we do in return? Here we show that our cooperative dispositions are weaker when we interact with AI. In nine experiments, humans interacted with either another human or an AI agent in four classic social dilemma economic games and a newly designed game of Reciprocity that we introduce here. Contrary to the hypothesis (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  15. HCI Model with Learning Mechanism for Cooperative Design in Pervasive Computing Environment.Hong Liu, Bin Hu & Philip Moore - 2015 - Journal of Internet Technology 16.
    This paper presents a human-computer interaction model with a three layers learning mechanism in a pervasive environment. We begin with a discussion around a number of important issues related to human-computer interaction followed by a description of the architecture for a multi-agent cooperative design system for pervasive computing environment. We present our proposed three- layer HCI model and introduce the group formation algorithm, which is predicated on a dynamic sharing niche technology. Finally, we explore (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  16. Unveiling the link between logical fallacies and web persuasion.Antonio Lieto & Fabiana Vernero - 2013 - In ACM Proceedings of the 5th Web Science Conference, Paris. ACM.
    In the last decade Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) has started to focus attention on forms of persuasive interaction where computer technologies have the goal of changing users behavior and attitudes according to a predefined direction. In this work, we hypothesize a strong connection between logical fallacies (forms of reasoning which are logically invalid but cognitively effective) and some common persuasion strategies adopted within web technologies. With the aim of empirically evaluating our hypothesis, we carried out a (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  17. Autonomous cognitive systems in real-world environments: Less control, more flexibility and better interaction.Vincent C. Müller - 2012 - Cognitive Computation 4 (3):212-215.
    In October 2011, the “2nd European Network for Cognitive Systems, Robotics and Interaction”, EUCogII, held its meeting in Groningen on “Autonomous activity in real-world environments”, organized by Tjeerd Andringa and myself. This is a brief personal report on why we thought autonomy in real-world environments is central for cognitive systems research and what I think I learned about it. --- The theses that crystallized are that a) autonomy is a relative property and a matter of degree, b) increasing autonomy (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  18. Can a Robot Do A Trust Fall? Absurdity as a Component of Human Intelligence and Embodiment.Ilya Vidrin & Amy Laviers - 2020 - Creative Computing.
    Trust is often considered valuable in a broad range of rela- tionships, from professional collaborations to personal part- nerships. This article examines the possibility of trust in a robotic system. By posing the question “can a robot do a trust fall?”, an investigation on the issues embedded in de- signing trusting systems is presented, using methods and per- spectives from philosophy and engineering. Posing such a question helps us understand the physicality and embodiment of trust, as well as the limits (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  19. Neural Implants as Gateways to Digital-Physical Ecosystems and Posthuman Socioeconomic Interaction.Matthew E. Gladden - 2016 - In Łukasz Jonak, Natalia Juchniewicz & Renata Włoch (eds.), Digital Ecosystems: Society in the Digital Age. Digital Economy Lab, University of Warsaw. pp. 85-98.
    For many employees, ‘work’ is no longer something performed while sitting at a computer in an office. Employees in a growing number of industries are expected to carry mobile devices and be available for work-related interactions even when beyond the workplace and outside of normal business hours. In this article it is argued that a future step will increasingly be to move work-related information and communication technology (ICT) inside the human body through the use of neuroprosthetics, to create (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  20. Social Machinery and Intelligence.Nello Cristianini, James Ladyman & Teresa Scantamburlo - manuscript
    Social machines are systems formed by technical and human elements interacting in a structured manner. The use of digital platforms as mediators allows large numbers of human participants to join such mechanisms, creating systems where interconnected digital and human components operate as a single machine capable of highly sophisticated behaviour. Under certain conditions, such systems can be described as autonomous and goal-driven agents. Many examples of modern Artificial Intelligence (AI) can be regarded as instances of this class (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  21. Logic and Social Cognition: The Facts Matter, and So Do Computational Models.Rineke Verbrugge - 2009 - Journal of Philosophical Logic 38 (6):649-680.
    This article takes off from Johan van Benthem’s ruminations on the interface between logic and cognitive science in his position paper “Logic and reasoning: Do the facts matter?”. When trying to answer Van Benthem’s question whether logic can be fruitfully combined with psychological experiments, this article focuses on a specific domain of reasoning, namely higher-order social cognition, including attributions such as “Bob knows that Alice knows that he wrote a novel under pseudonym”. For intelligent interaction, it is important that (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   14 citations  
  22. A Minimal Turing Test: Reciprocal Sensorimotor Contingencies for Interaction Detection.Pamela Barone, Manuel G. Bedia & Antoni Gomila - 2020 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 14:481235.
    In the classical Turing test, participants are challenged to tell whether they are interacting with another human being or with a machine. The way the interaction takes place is not direct, but a distant conversation through computer screen messages. Basic forms of interaction are face-to-face and embodied, context-dependent and based on the detection of reciprocal sensorimotor contingencies. Our idea is that interaction detection requires the integration of proprioceptive and interoceptive patterns with sensorimotor patterns, within quite (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  23.  59
    Logic and social cognition the facts matter, and so do computational models.Rineke Verbrugge - 2009 - Journal of Philosophical Logic 38 (6):649-680.
    This article takes off from Johan van Benthem’s ruminations on the interface between logic and cognitive science in his position paper “Logic and reasoning: Do the facts matter?”. When trying to answer Van Benthem’s question whether logic can be fruitfully combined with psychological experiments, this article focuses on a specific domain of reasoning, namely higher-order social cognition, including attributions such as “Bob knows that Alice knows that he wrote a novel under pseudonym”. For intelligent interaction, it is important that (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   16 citations  
  24. The Language of Human-Machine Communication. Technology and Language.Daria Bylieva - 2020 - Technology and Language 1 (1):16-21.
    This essay for the inaugural issue of Technology and Language discusses the problem of finding an optimal form of human-machine communication. In the ongoing search for an alien mind, humanity seems to find it not in the infinities of space, but in its own environment. Changes in the language of human-machine interaction made it understandable not only to trained specialists but to every household. In the course of time, home appliances and devices have developed their language abilities (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  25. WHERE DO NEW IDEAS COME FROM? HOW DO THEY EMERGE? - EPISTEMOLOGY AS COMPUTATION.Gordana Dodig-Crnkovic - 2007 - In Christian Calude (ed.), Randomness & Complexity, from Leibniz to Chaitin. Singapore: World Scientific. pp. 263-281.
    This essay presents arguments for the claim that in the best of all possible worlds (Leibniz) there are sources of unpredictability and creativity for us humans, even given a pancomputational stance. A suggested answer to Chaitin’s questions: “Where do new mathematical and biological ideas come from? How do they emerge?” is that they come from the world and emerge from basic physical (computational) laws. For humans as a tiny subset of the universe, a part of the new ideas comes as (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  26. Planning for Ethical Agent-Agent Interaction.Jesse David Dinneen - 2019 - Good Systems: Ethical AI for CSCW, Workshop at CSCW '19: ACM SIGCHI Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work.
    In this position paper for the 2019 CSCW workshop Good Systems: Ethical AI for CSCW I propose one tool and one idea for navigating the complex ethical problem space that results from the interaction of human and/or AI agents in shared, hopefully cooperative, computing environments.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  27. Thought, Sign and Machine - the Idea of the Computer Reconsidered.Niels Ole Finnemann - 1999 - Copenhagen: Danish Original: Akademisk Forlag 1994. Tanke, Sprog og Maskine..
    Throughout what is now the more than 50-year history of the computer many theories have been advanced regarding the contribution this machine would make to changes both in the structure of society and in ways of thinking. Like other theories regarding the future, these should also be taken with a pinch of salt. The history of the development of computer technology contains many predictions which have failed to come true and many applications that have not been foreseen. While (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  28. Turing on the integration of human and machine intelligence.S. G. Sterrett - 2014
    Abstract Philosophical discussion of Alan Turing’s writings on intelligence has mostly revolved around a single point made in a paper published in the journal Mind in 1950. This is unfortunate, for Turing’s reflections on machine (artificial) intelligence, human intelligence, and the relation between them were more extensive and sophisticated. They are seen to be extremely well-considered and sound in retrospect. Recently, IBM developed a question-answering computer (Watson) that could compete against humans on the game show Jeopardy! There are (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  29. Introduction to: Norms, Logics and Information Systems: New Studies on Deontic Logic and Computer Science.Paul McNamara & Henry Prakken - 1999 - In Paul McNamara & Prakken Henry (eds.), Norms, Logics and Information Systems: New Studies on Deontic Logic and Computer Science. Amsterdam: pp. 1-14.
    (See also the separate entry for the volume itself.) This introduction has three parts. The first providing an overview of some main lines of research in deontic logic: the emergence of SDL, Chisholm's paradox and the development of dyadic deontic logics, various other puzzles/challenges and areas of development, along with philosophical applications. The second part focus on some actual and potential fruitful interactions between deontic logic, computer science and artificial intelligence. These include applications of deontic logic to AI knowledge (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  30. Bodily Systems and the Spatial-Functional Structure of the Human Body.Barry Smith - 2004 - Studies in Health and Technology Informatics 102:39–63.
    The human body is a system made of systems. The body is divided into bodily systems proper, such as the endocrine and circulatory systems, which are subdivided into many sub-systems at a variety of levels, whereby all systems and subsystems engage in massive causal interaction with each other and with their surrounding environments. Here we offer an explicit definition of bodily system and provide a framework for understanding their causal interactions. Medical sciences provide at best informal accounts of (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  31. Marketing as control of human interfaces and its political exploitation.Luciano Floridi - 2019 - Philosophy and Technology 32 (3):379-388.
    In previous works, I defined ourselves as informational organisms, or inforgs for short, who forage for, produce, cultivate, curate, process, and consume information (Floridi 2013). Yet, we may also be understood as interfaces, who inhabit and interact with, an environment also made up of data and computational processes. By describing ourselves in such terms, this paper argues that we can better understand several crucial phenomena that characterise our digital age, including marketing and the “marketisation” of political communication. The article concludes (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  32. Embodied Cognition and the Magical Future of Interaction Design.David Kirsh - 2013 - ACM Transactions on Computer-Human Interaction 20 (1):30.
    The theory of embodied cognition can provide HCI practitioners and theorists with new ideas about interac-tion and new principles for better designs. I support this claim with four ideas about cognition: (1) interacting with tools changes the way we think and perceive – tools, when manipulated, are soon absorbed into the body schema, and this absorption leads to fundamental changes in the way we perceive and conceive of our environments; (2) we think with our bodies not just with our brains; (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   21 citations  
  33. Consensus-Based Data Management within Fog Computing For the Internet of Things.Al-Doghman Firas Qais Mohammed Saleh - 2019 - Dissertation, University of Technology Sydney
    The Internet of Things (IoT) infrastructure forms a gigantic network of interconnected and interacting devices. This infrastructure involves a new generation of service delivery models, more advanced data management and policy schemes, sophisticated data analytics tools, and effective decision making applications. IoT technology brings automation to a new level wherein nodes can communicate and make autonomous decisions in the absence of human interventions. IoT enabled solutions generate and process enormous volumes of heterogeneous data exchanged among billions of nodes. This (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  34. Medical AI and human dignity: Contrasting perceptions of human and artificially intelligent (AI) decision making in diagnostic and medical resource allocation contexts.Paul Formosa, Wendy Rogers, Yannick Griep, Sarah Bankins & Deborah Richards - 2022 - Computers in Human Behaviour 133.
    Forms of Artificial Intelligence (AI) are already being deployed into clinical settings and research into its future healthcare uses is accelerating. Despite this trajectory, more research is needed regarding the impacts on patients of increasing AI decision making. In particular, the impersonal nature of AI means that its deployment in highly sensitive contexts-of-use, such as in healthcare, raises issues associated with patients’ perceptions of (un) dignified treatment. We explore this issue through an experimental vignette study comparing individuals’ perceptions of being (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  35. Mutual Recognition in Human-Robot Interaction: a Deflationary Account.Ingar Brinck & Christian Balkenius - 2020 - Philosophy and Technology 33 (1):53-70.
    Mutually adaptive interaction involves the robot as a partner as opposed to a tool, and requires that the robot is susceptible to similar environmental cues and behavior patterns as humans are. Recognition, or the acknowledgement of the other as individual, is fundamental to mutually adaptive interaction between humans. We discuss what recognition involves and its behavioral manifestations, and describe the benefits of implementing it in HRI.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   13 citations  
  36. Environments of Intelligence. From Natural Information to Artficial Interaction.Hajo Greif - 2017 - London: Routledge.
    What is the role of the environment, and of the information it provides, in cognition? More specifically, may there be a role for certain artefacts to play in this context? These are questions that motivate "4E" theories of cognition (as being embodied, embedded, extended, enactive). In his take on that family of views, Hajo Greif first defends and refines a concept of information as primarily natural, environmentally embedded in character, which had been eclipsed by information-processing views of cognition. He continues (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  37. The social turn of artificial intelligence.Nello Cristianini, Teresa Scantamburlo & James Ladyman - 2021 - AI and Society (online).
    Social machines are systems formed by material and human elements interacting in a structured way. The use of digital platforms as mediators allows large numbers of humans to participate in such machines, which have interconnected AI and human components operating as a single system capable of highly sophisticated behavior. Under certain conditions, such systems can be understood as autonomous goal-driven agents. Many popular online platforms can be regarded as instances of this class of agent. We argue that autonomous (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  38. Distributed responsibility in human–machine interactions.Anna Strasser - 2021 - AI and Ethics.
    Artificial agents have become increasingly prevalent in human social life. In light of the diversity of new human–machine interactions, we face renewed questions about the distribution of moral responsibility. Besides positions denying the mere possibility of attributing moral responsibility to artificial systems, recent approaches discuss the circumstances under which artificial agents may qualify as moral agents. This paper revisits the discussion of how responsibility might be distributed between artificial agents and human interaction partners (including producers of (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  39. Menschengestützte Künstliche Intelligenz: Über die soziotechnischen Voraussetzungen von "deep learning".Rainer Mühlhoff - 2019 - Zeitschrift Für Medienwissenschaft (ZfM) 21 (2):56–64.
    Die aktuellen Erfolge von Künstlicher Intelligenz beruhen nicht nur auf technologischen Fortschritten, sondern auch auf einem grundlegenden soziotechnischen Strukturwandel. Denn maschinelle Lernverfahren wie Deep Learning benötigen eine große Menge Trainingsdaten, die nur über menschliche Mitarbeit gewonnen werden können. In einer Konvergenz von Methoden der Human-Computer-Interaction und der KI ist in den letzten zehn Jahren eine Fülle von Mensch-Maschine-Interfaces und medialen Infrastrukturen entstanden, durch die menschliche kognitive Ressourcen in hybride Mensch-Maschine-Apparate eingespannt werden. Diese Apparate vollbringen im Ganzen jene (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  40. The ethics of digital well-being: a thematic review.Christopher Burr, Mariarosaria Taddeo & Luciano Floridi - 2020 - Science and Engineering Ethics 26 (4):2313–2343.
    This article presents the first thematic review of the literature on the ethical issues concerning digital well-being. The term ‘digital well-being’ is used to refer to the impact of digital technologies on what it means to live a life that is good for a human being. The review explores the existing literature on the ethics of digital well-being, with the goal of mapping the current debate and identifying open questions for future research. The review identifies major issues related to (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   16 citations  
  41. Social Norms in Virtual Worlds of Computer Games.Daria Bylieva & Tatiana Nam - 2018 - In Advances in Social Science, Education and Humanities Research. Proceedings of the International Conference Communicative Strategies of Information Society (CSIS 2018). pp. 369-373.
    Immersing in the virtual world of the Internet, information and communication technologies are changing the human being. In spite of the apparent similarity of on-line and off-line, social laws of their existence are different. According to the analysis of games, based on the violation of the accepted laws of the world off-line, their censoring, as well as the cheating, features of formation and violations of social norms in virtual worlds were formulated. Although the creators of the games have priority (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  42. Predicting Tetris Performance Using Early Keystrokes.Gianluca Guglielmo, Michal Klincewicz, Elisabeth Huis in 'T. Veld & Pieter Spronck - 2023 - Fdg '23: Proceedings of the 18Th International Conference on the Foundations of Digital Games 46:1-4.
    In this study, we predict the different levels of performance in a Nintendo Entertainment System (NES) Tetris session based on the score and the number of matches played by the players. Using the first 45 seconds of gameplay, a Random Forest Classifier was trained on the five keys used in the game obtaining a ROC_AUC score of 0.80. Further analysis revealed that the number of down keys (forced drop) and the number of left keys (left translation) are the most relevant (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  43. Mutual Recognition in Human-Robot Interaction: a Deflationary Account.Ingar Brinck & Christian Balkenius - 2018 - Philosophy and Technology 1 (1):53-70.
    Mutually adaptive interaction involves the robot as a partner as opposed to a tool, and requires that the robot is susceptible to similar environmental cues and behavior patterns as humans are. Recognition, or the acknowledgement of the other as individual, is fundamental to mutually adaptive interaction between humans. We discuss what recognition involves and its behavioral manifestations, and describe the benefits of implementing it in HRI.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   13 citations  
  44. Influencing the Others’ Minds: an Experimental Evaluation of the Use and Efficacy of Fallacious-reducible Arguments in Web and Mobile Technologies.Antonio Lieto & Fabiana Vernero - 2014 - PsychNology Journa 12 (3):87-105.
    The research in Human Computer Interaction (HCI) has nowadays extended its attention to the study of persuasive technologies. Following this line of research, in this paper we focus on websites and mobile applications in the e-commerce domain. In particular, we take them as an evident example of persuasive technologies. Starting from the hypothesis that there is a strong connection between logical fallacies, i.e., forms of reasoning which are logically invalid but psychologically persuasive, and some common persuasion strategies (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  45. Cognitive Biases for the Design of Persuasive Technologies: Uses, Abuses and Ethical Concerns.Antonio Lieto - 2021 - ACM Distinguished Speakers - Lecture Series.
    In the last decades Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) has started to focus attention on “persuasive technologies” having the goal of changing users’ behavior and attitudes according to a predefined direction. In this talk we show how some of the techniques employed in such technologies trigger some well known cognitive biases by adopting a strategy relying on logical fallacies (i.e. forms of reasoning which are logically invalid but psychologically persuasive). In particular, we will show how the mechanisms reducible to (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  46. Distributed selves: Personal identity and extended memory systems.Richard Heersmink - 2017 - Synthese 194 (8):3135–3151.
    This paper explores the implications of extended and distributed cognition theory for our notions of personal identity. On an extended and distributed approach to cognition, external information is under certain conditions constitutive of memory. On a narrative approach to personal identity, autobiographical memory is constitutive of our diachronic self. In this paper, I bring these two approaches together and argue that external information can be constitutive of one’s autobiographical memory and thus also of one’s diachronic self. To develop this claim, (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   48 citations  
  47. The ethics of digital well-being: a thematic review.Christopher Burr, Mariarosaria Taddeo & Luciano Floridi - 2020 - Science and Engineering Ethics 26 (4):2313–⁠2343.
    This article presents the first thematic review of the literature on the ethical issues concerning digital well-being. The term ‘digital well-being’ is used to refer to the impact of digital technologies on what it means to live a life that isgood fora human being. The review explores the existing literature on the ethics of digital well-being, with the goal of mapping the current debate and identifying open questions for future research. The review identifies major issues related to several key (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   18 citations  
  48. Can Machines Read our Minds?Christopher Burr & Nello Cristianini - 2019 - Minds and Machines 29 (3):461-494.
    We explore the question of whether machines can infer information about our psychological traits or mental states by observing samples of our behaviour gathered from our online activities. Ongoing technical advances across a range of research communities indicate that machines are now able to access this information, but the extent to which this is possible and the consequent implications have not been well explored. We begin by highlighting the urgency of asking this question, and then explore its conceptual underpinnings, in (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   16 citations  
  49. The value of responsibility gaps in algorithmic decision-making.Lauritz Munch, Jakob Mainz & Jens Christian Bjerring - 2023 - Ethics and Information Technology 25 (1):1-11.
    Many seem to think that AI-induced responsibility gaps are morally bad and therefore ought to be avoided. We argue, by contrast, that there is at least a pro tanto reason to welcome responsibility gaps. The central reason is that it can be bad for people to be responsible for wrongdoing. This, we argue, gives us one reason to prefer automated decision-making over human decision-making, especially in contexts where the risks of wrongdoing are high. While we are not the first (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  50. The emergence of “truth machines”?: Artificial intelligence approaches to lie detection.Jo Ann Oravec - 2022 - Ethics and Information Technology 24 (1):1-10.
    This article analyzes emerging artificial intelligence (AI)-enhanced lie detection systems from ethical and human resource (HR) management perspectives. I show how these AI enhancements transform lie detection, followed with analyses as to how the changes can lead to moral problems. Specifically, I examine how these applications of AI introduce human rights issues of fairness, mental privacy, and bias and outline the implications of these changes for HR management. The changes that AI is making to lie detection are altering (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
1 — 50 / 1000