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  1. Perception and Pluralism: Leibniz’s Theological Derivation of Perception in Connection with Platonism, Rationalism and Substance Monism.Gastón Robert - 2020 - Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 102 (1):56-101.
    This article discusses Leibniz’s claim that every substance is endowed with the property of perception in connection with Platonism, rationalism and the problem of substance monism. It is argued that Leibniz’s ascription of perception to every substance relies on his Platonic conception of finite things as imitations of God, in whom there is ‘infinite perception’. Leibniz’s Platonism, however, goes beyond the notion of imitation, including also the emanative causal relation and the logical priority of the absolute over the limited. It (...)
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  • Leibniz’s Syncategorematic Infinitesimals II: Their Existence, Their Use and Their Role in the Justification of the Differential Calculus.David Rabouin & Richard T. W. Arthur - 2020 - Archive for History of Exact Sciences 74 (5):401-443.
    In this paper, we endeavour to give a historically accurate presentation of how Leibniz understood his infinitesimals, and how he justified their use. Some authors claim that when Leibniz called them “fictions” in response to the criticisms of the calculus by Rolle and others at the turn of the century, he had in mind a different meaning of “fiction” than in his earlier work, involving a commitment to their existence as non-Archimedean elements of the continuum. Against this, we show that (...)
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  • The Indefinite in the Descartes-More Correspondence.Tad M. Schmaltz - 2020 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 29 (3):453-471.
    ABSTRACT In this article, I consider Descartes’ enigmatic claim that we must assert that the material world is indefinite rather than infinite. The focus here is on the discussion of this claim in Descartes’ late correspondence with More. One puzzle that emerges from this correspondence is that Descartes insists to More that we are not in a position to deny the indefinite universe has limits, while at the same time indicating that we conceive a contradiction in the notion that the (...)
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  • Leibniz’s Argument Against Infinite Number.Filippo Costantini - 2019 - History of Philosophy & Logical Analysis 22 (1):203-218.
    This paper deals with Leibniz’s well-known reductio argument against the infinite number. I will show that while the argument is in itself valid, the assumption that Leibniz reduces to absurdity does not play a relevant role. The last paragraph of the paper reformulates the whole Leibnizian argument in plural terms to show that it is possible to derive the contradiction that Leibniz uses in his argument even in the absence of the premise that he refutes.
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  • Descartes’s Indefinitely Extended Universe.Jasper Reid - 2019 - Dialogue 58 (2):341-369.
    Descartes believed the extended world did not terminate in a boundary: but why? After elucidating Descartes’s position in §1, suggesting his conception of the indefinite extension of the universe should be understood as actual but syncategorematic, we turn in §2 to his argument: any postulation of an outermost surface for the world will be self-defeating, because merely contemplating such a boundary will lead us to recognise the existence of further extension beyond it. In §3, we identify the fundamental assumption underlying (...)
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  • Three Infinities in Early Modern Philosophy.Anat Schechtman - 2019 - Mind 128 (512):1117-1147.
    Many historical and philosophical studies treat infinity as an exclusively quantitative notion, whose proper domain of application is mathematics and physics. The main aim of this paper is to disentangle, by critically examining, three notions of infinity in the early modern period, and to argue that one—but only one—of them is quantitative. One of these non-quantitative notions concerns being or reality, while the other concerns a particular iterative property of an aggregate. These three notions will emerge through examination of three (...)
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  • Uma introdução atualizada a Leibniz. [REVIEW]César Schirmer Dos Santos - 2016 - Filosofia Unisinos 17 (3):390-391.
    Book review: ANTOGNAZZA, M.R. 2016. Leibniz: A very short introduction. Oxford, Oxford University Press, 175 p.
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