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Kierkegaard on Indirect Communication, the Crowd, and a Monstrous Illusion

In Robert L. Perkins (ed.), International Kierkegaard Commentary: Point of View. Macon, GA, USA: Mercer University Press. pp. 295-324 (2010)

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  1. Voices of Madness in Foucault and Kierkegaard.Heather C. Ohaneson - 2020 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 87 (1):27-54.
    The central idea of this paper is that Michel Foucault and Søren Kierkegaard are unexpected allies in the investigation into the relation between madness and reason. These thinkers criticize reason’s presumption of purity and call into question reason’s isolation from madness. Strategies of indirect communication and regard for paradox from Kierkegaard’s nineteenth-century works find new ground in Foucault’s twentieth-century archaeological undertaking as Foucault illuminates “both-and” moments in the history of madness, uncovering points where rationalism paradoxically conceives of madness or where (...)
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  • A Moral Problem for Difficult Art.Antony Aumann - 2016 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 74 (4):383-396.
    Works of art can be difficult in several ways. One important way is by making us face up to unsettling truths. Such works typically receive praise. I maintain, however, that sometimes they deserve moral censure. The crux of my argument is that, just as we have a right to know the truth in certain contexts, so too we have a right not to know it. Provided our ignorance does not harm or seriously endanger others, the decision about whether to know (...)
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