Switch to: References

Citations of:

The Carpenter and the Good

In D. Cairns, F. G. Herrmann & T. Penner (eds.), Pursuing the Good: Ethics and Metaphysics in Plato's Republic. University of Edinburgh (2008)

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. The Metaphysics of Goodness in the Ethics of Aristotle.Samuel H. Baker - 2017 - Philosophical Studies 174 (7):1839-1856.
    Kraut and other neo-Aristotelians have argued that there is no such thing as absolute goodness. They admit only good in a kind, e.g. a good sculptor, and good for something, e.g. good for fish. What is the view of Aristotle? Mostly limiting myself to the Nicomachean Ethics, I argue that Aristotle is committed to things being absolutely good and also to a metaphysics of absolute goodness where there is a maximally best good that is the cause of the goodness of (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • Aristotle’s Criticism of the Platonic Idea of the Good in Nicomachean Ethics 1.6.Melina G. Mouzala - 2017 - Peitho 8 (1):309-342.
    In Nicomachean Ethics 1.6, Aristotle directs his criticism not only against the Platonic Idea of the Good but also against the notion of a universal Good. In this paper, I also examine some of the most interesting aspects of his criticism of the Platonic Good and the universal Good in Eudemian Ethics 1.8. In the EN, after using a series of disputable ontological arguments, Aristotle’s criticism culminates in a strong ethical or rather practical and, simultaneously, epistemological argument, from which a (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Plato’s Bond of Love : Erôs as Participation in Beauty.Lauren Patricia Wenden Hosty Ware - unknown
    In his dialogues, Plato presents different ways in which to understand the relation between Forms and particulars. In the Symposium, we are presented with yet another, hitherto unidentified Form-particular relation: the relation is Love, which binds together Form and particular in a generative manner, fulfilling all the metaphysical requirements of the individual’s qualification by participation. Love in relation to the beautiful motivates human action to desire for knowledge of the Form, resulting in the lover actively cultivating and bringing into being (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Erotic Virtue.Lauren Ware - 2015 - Res Philosophica 92 (4):915-935.
    This paper defends an account of how erotic love works to develop virtue. It is argued that love drives moral development by holding the creation of virtue in the individual as the emotion’s intentional object. After analyzing the distinction between passive and active ac- counts of the object of love, this paper demonstrates that a Platonic virtue-ethical understanding of erotic love—far from being consumed with ascetic contemplation—offers a positive treatment of emotion’s role in the attainment and social practice of virtue.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Notes on the Kalon and the Good in Plato.Rachel Barney - 2010 - Classical Philology 105:363-377.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark