Switch to: References

Citations of:

The Sophistic Movement

In M. L. Gill & P. Pellegrin (eds.), A Companion to Ancient Philosophy. Blackwell (2006)

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. Collections Containing Articles on Presocratic Philosophy.Richard D. McKirahan - unknown
    This catalogue is divided into two parts. Part 1 presents basic bibliographical information on books and journal issues that consist exclusively or in large part in papers devoted to the Presocratics and the Sophists. Part 2 lists the papers on Presocratic and Sophistic topics found in the volumes, providing name of author, title, and page numbers, and in the case of reprinted papers, the year of original publication. In some cases Part 2 lists the complete contents of volumes, not only (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Convention or Nature? : The Correctness of Names in Plato's Cratylus.Rickard Gustavsson - unknown
    This thesis is about Plato‘s dialogue Cratylus, which is one of the earliest texts in the history ofphilosophy of language and has generated much interpretive controversy. In the dialogue, Platoexamines two theories on the correctness of names; conventionalism and naturalism. However,there is no clear positive outcome in the dialogue in regard to the debate betweenconventionalism and naturalism. Therefore, scholars have long been divided as to what Plato‘sown position on the correctness of names is. Another puzzling feature of the dialogue concernsthe (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Plato's Socrates and His Conception of Philosophy.Eric Brown - forthcoming - In Richard Kraut & David Ebrey (eds.), The Cambridge Companion to Plato, 2nd ed. Cambridge:
    This is a study of Plato's use of the character Socrates to model what philosophy is. The study focuses on the Apology, and finds that philosophy there is the love of wisdom, where wisdom is expertise about how to live, of the sort that only gods can fully have, and where Socrates loves wisdom in three ways, first by honoring wisdom as the gods' possession, testing human claims to it, second by pursuing wisdom, examining himself as he examines others, to (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Πέφυκεν Πλεονεκτεῖν? Plato and the Sophists on Greed and Savage Humanity.Chloe Balla - 2018 - Polis 35 (1):83-101.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Truth and Falsehood for Non-Representationalists: Gorgias on the Normativity of Language.Juan Pablo Bermúdez - 2017 - Journal of Ancient Philosophy 11 (2):1-21.
    Sophists and rhetoricians like Gorgias are often accused of disregarding truth and rationality: their speeches seem to aim only at effective persuasion, and be constrained by nothing but persuasiveness itself. In his extant texts Gorgias claims that language does not represent external objects or communicate internal states, but merely generates behavioural responses in people. It has been argued that this perspective erodes the possibility of rationally assessing speeches by making persuasiveness the only norm, and persuasive power the only virtue, of (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark