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  1. Informed Consent in Asymmetrical Relationships: An Investigation Into Relational Factors That Influence Room for Reflection.Shannon Lydia Spruit, Ibo Poel & Neelke Doorn - 2016 - NanoEthics 10 (2):123-138.
    In recent years, informed consent has been suggested as a way to deal with risks posed by engineered nanomaterials. We argue that while we can learn from experiences with informed consent in treatment and research contexts, we should be aware that informed consent traditionally pertains to certain features of the relationships between doctors and patients and researchers and research participants, rather than those between producers and consumers and employers and employees, which are more prominent in the case of engineered nanomaterials. (...)
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  • Informed Consent in Asymmetrical Relationships: An Investigation Into Relational Factors That Influence Room for Reflection.Shannon Lydia Spruit, Ibo van de Poel & Neelke Doorn - 2016 - NanoEthics 10 (2):123-138.
    In recent years, informed consent has been suggested as a way to deal with risks posed by engineered nanomaterials. We argue that while we can learn from experiences with informed consent in treatment and research contexts, we should be aware that informed consent traditionally pertains to certain features of the relationships between doctors and patients and researchers and research participants, rather than those between producers and consumers and employers and employees, which are more prominent in the case of engineered nanomaterials. (...)
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  • When Respecting Autonomy Is Harmful: A Clinically Useful Approach to the Nocebo Effect.Daniel Londyn Menkes, Jason Adam Wasserman & John T. Fortunato - 2017 - American Journal of Bioethics 17 (6):36-42.
    Nocebo effects occur when an adverse effect on the patient arises from the patient's own negative expectations. In accordance with informed consent, providers often disclose information that results in unintended adverse outcomes for the patient. While this may adhere to the principle of autonomy, it violates the doctrine of “primum non nocere,” given that side-effect disclosure may cause those side effects. In this article we build off previous work, particularly by Wells and Kaptchuk and by Cohen :3–11.[Taylor & Francis Online], (...)
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