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  1. Striking the Balance with Epistemic Injustice in Healthcare: The Case of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome/Myalgic Encephalomyelitis.Eleanor Alexandra Byrne - 2020 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 23 (3):371-379.
    Miranda Fricker’s influential concept of epistemic injustice has recently seen application to many areas of interest, with an increasing body of healthcare research using the concept of epistemic injustice in order to develop both general frameworks and accounts of specific medical conditions and patient groups. This paper illuminates tensions that arise between taking steps to protect against committing epistemic injustice in healthcare, and taking steps to understand the complexity of one’s predicament and treat it accordingly. Work on epistemic injustice is (...)
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  • A Concerning Display of Medical Indifference: Reply to ‘Chronic Fatigue Syndrome and an Illness-Focused Approach to Care: Controversy, Morality and Paradox’.Diane O'Leary - forthcoming - Medical Humanities:medhum-2019-011743.
    In ‘Chronic fatigue syndrome and an illness-focused approach to care: controversy, morality and paradox’, authors Michael Sharpe and Monica Greco begin by characterising myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome as illness-without-disease. On that basis they ask why patients reject treatments for illness-without-disease, and they answer with a philosophical idea. Whitehead’s ‘bifurcation of nature’, they suggest, still dominates public and professional thinking, and that conceptual confusion leads patients to reject the treatment they need. A great deal has occurred, however, since Whitehead characterised his (...)
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  • Epistemic Injustice in Health Care Professionals and Male Breast Cancer Patients Encounters.Ahtisham Younas - forthcoming - Ethics and Behavior:1-11.
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  • Do Metaphors Matter? Fibromyalgia and Women's Embodiment.Amy L. McKiernan - 2018 - International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 11 (2):112-134.
    During the winter of 2016, I attended a four-part class aimed at promoting wellness for those who suffer from chronic pain. At our second meeting, I asked the psychologist facilitating the class, "Do you know of any metaphors beyond severe weakness or violence that I might use to describe my pain?" He looked surprised and lifted his hand to his heart. "I'm so sorry that you feel like you need to describe your experiences this way," he replied, then stared at (...)
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  • Are ME/CFS Patient Organizations “Militant”?Charlotte Blease & Keith J. Geraghty - 2018 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 15 (3):393-401.
    Myalgic encephalomyelitis or chronic fatigue syndrome is a contested illness category. This paper investigates the common claim that patients with ME/CFS—and by extension, ME/CFS patient organizations —exhibit “militant” social and political tendencies. The paper opens with a history of the protracted scientific disagreement over ME/CFS. We observe that ME/CFS POs, medical doctors, and medical researchers exhibit clear differences in opinion over how to conceptualize this illness. However, we identify a common trope in the discourse over ME/CFS: the claim of “militant” (...)
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  • Naked in the Eyes of the Public: A Phenomenological Study of the Lived Experience of Suffering From Burnout While Waiting for Recognition to Be Ill.Karin Mohn Engebretsen & Wenche Schrøder Bjorbækmo - 2019 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 25 (6):1017-1026.
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  • Healthcare Practice, Epistemic Injustice, and Naturalism.Ian James Kidd & Havi Carel - 2018 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 84:1-23.
    Ill persons suffer from a variety of epistemically-inflected harms and wrongs. Many of these are interpretable as specific forms of what we dub pathocentric epistemic injustices, these being ones that target and track ill persons. We sketch the general forms of pathocentric testimonial and hermeneutical injustice, each of which are pervasive within the experiences of ill persons during their encounters in healthcare contexts and the social world. What’s epistemically unjust might not be only agents, communities and institutions, but the theoretical (...)
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  • Why Do Medical Professional Regulators Dismiss Most Complaints From Members of the Public? Regulatory Illiteracy, Epistemic Injustice, and Symbolic Power.Orla O’Donovan & Deirdre Madden - 2018 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 15 (3):469-478.
    Drawing on an analysis of complaint files that we conducted for the Irish Medical Council, this paper offers three possible explanations for the gap between the ubiquity of official commitments to taking patients’ complaints seriously and medical professional regulators’ dismissal—as not warranting an inquiry—of the vast majority of complaints submitted by members of the public. One explanation points to the “regulatory illiteracy” of many complainants, where the remit and threshold of seriousness of regulators is poorly understood by the general public. (...)
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  • Error Trawling and Fringe Decision Competence: Ethical Hazards in Monitoring and Address Patient Decision Capacity in Clinical Practice.Thomas Hartvigsson, Christian Munthe & Gun Forsander - 2018 - Clinical Ethics 13 (3):126-136.
    This article addresses how health professionals should monitor and safeguard their patients’ ability to participate in making clinical decisions and making subsequent decisions regarding the implementation of their treatment plan. Patient participation in clinical decision-making is essential, e.g. in self-care, where patients are responsible for most ongoing care. We argue that one common, fact-oriented patient education strategy may in practice easily tend to take a destructive form that we call error trawling. Illustrating with empirical findings from a video study of (...)
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