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A Critique of Philip Pettit's Republicanism

Noûs 35 (s1):229 - 243 (2001)

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  1. Arendt on Positive Freedom.Alexei Gloukhov - 2015 - Russian Sociological Review 14 (2):9-22.
    Hannah Arendt’s concept of freedom is exceptional in contemporary political theory. First, it is positive, which puts it into opposition to the both current versions of its negative counterpart, the liberal, and the republican concepts of freedom. In particular, a comparison between Arendt’s and Pettit’s approaches allows establishing some striking points of antagonistic logical mirroring. Based on this, the notion of “schools of thought” is introduced, which plays an essential role in the subsequent discussion of Arendtian realism. Second, although Arendt’s (...)
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  • Concepts and Consequences of Liberty: From Smith and Mill to Libertarian Paternalism.David Meskill - 2013 - Critical Review 25 (1):86-106.
    Isaiah Berlin distinguished between negative liberty, which is freedom from external coercion, and positive liberty, the freedom to master oneself. But the schema is too simple. Adam Smith thought that God had harmoniously arranged the world in such a way that the freedom provided by our negative liberty tended to redound to the public good. Mill, worried about the deleterious effects of public ignorance, accorded elites a prominent role in ensuring that negative liberty would lead to positive results. More recently, (...)
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  • Freedom as Non‐Domination, Standards and the Negotiated Curriculum.Neil Hopkins - 2015 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 49 (4):607-618.
    This article investigates the application of Philip Pettit's concept of freedom as non-domination to the issues of educational standards and the negotiated curriculum. The article will argue that freedom as non-domination shines a critical light on governmental practice in England over the past two decades. Joshua Cohen's proposal of an ideal deliberative procedure is offered as a potential mechanism for the facilitation of debating contestations between stakeholders over the curriculum. Cohen places particular importance on the participants being ‘formally and substantively (...)
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