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  1. Why Socrates’ Legs Didn’T Run Off to Megara.Ellisif Wasmuth - 2020 - Phronesis 65 (4):380-413.
    I argue that the arguments presented in Socrates’ dialogue with the personified Laws of the Crito are arguments Socrates endorses and relies upon when deciding to remain in prison. They do not, however, entail blind obedience to every court verdict, nor do they provide necessary and sufficient conditions for resolving every dilemma of civil disobedience. Indeed, lacking definitional knowledge of justice, we should not expect Socrates to be able to offer such conditions. Instead, the Laws present an argument that is (...)
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  • Socrates and Superiority.Nathan Hanna - 2007 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 45 (2):251-268.
    I propose an alternative interpretation of the Crito. The arguments that are typically taken to be Socrates’ primary arguments against escape are actually supplementary arguments that rely on what I call the Superiority Thesis, the thesis that the state and its citizens are members of a moral hierarchy where those below are tied by bonds of obligation to those above. I provide evidence that Socrates holds this thesis, demonstrate how it resolves a number of apparent difficulties and show why my (...)
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  • Persuasion, Justice and Democracy in Plato’s Crito.Yosef Z. Liebersohn - 2015 - Peitho 6 (1):147-166.
    Speeches and persuasion dominate Plato’s Crito. This paper, paying particular attention to the final passage in the dialogue, shows that the focus on speeches, persuasion and allusions to many other elements of rhetoric is an integral part of Plato’s severe criticism of democracy, one of the main points of the Crito. Speeches allow members of a democracy – represented in our dialogue by Crito – firstly to break the law for self-interested reasons while considering themselves still to be law-abiding citizens, (...)
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  • ¿Obedecer las leyes?: utilitarismo, retórica forense y autoridad en el Critón de Platón.Eduardo Esteban Magoja - 2017 - Tópicos: Revista de Filosofía 53:411-436.
    En el Critón de Platón se recurre a un interesante argumento utilitarista para justificar la obligación política de los ciudadanos. El argumento sostiene que la violación de las leyes lleva a la destrucción de cualquier sistema jurídico y acarrea resultados perjudiciales para los miembros de la comunidad. En este trabajo realizaremos un análisis crítico del argumento bajo los postulados de tres corrientes utilitaristas: el utilitarismo de acto, la generalización utilitarista y el utilitarismo de regla. Veremos cómo esta clase de argumentación (...)
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  • Socrates and the Laws of Athens.Thomas C. Brickhouse & Nicholas D. Smith - 2006 - Philosophy Compass 1 (6):564–570.
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  • What is Civil Disobedience?J. Angelo Corlett - 1997 - Philosophical Papers 26 (3):241-259.
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