Switch to: References

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. Aristotle's Anatomical Philosophy of Nature.Christopher E. Cosans - 1998 - Biology and Philosophy 13 (3):311-339.
    This paper explores the anatomical foundations of Aristotle's natural philosophy. Rather than simply looking at the body, he contrives specific procedures for revealing unmanifest phenomena. In some cases, these interventions seem extensive enough to qualify as experiments. At the work bench, one can observe the parts of animals in the manner Aristotle describes, even if his descriptions seem at odds with 20th century textbooks. Manipulating animals allows us to recover his teleological thought more fully. This consideration of Aristotle as a (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Enchanted Nature, Dissected Nature: The Case of Galen’s Anatomical Theology.Kimbell Kornu - 2018 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 39 (6):453-471.
    Through the historical portrait of Galen, I argue that even an enchanted nature does not prevent the performance of violence against nature. Galen, the great physician-philosopher of antiquity, is best known for his systematization and innovation of the Hippocratic medical tradition, whose thought was the reigning medical orthodoxy from the medieval period into the Renaissance. His works on anatomy were the standard that Vesalius’ works on anatomy overturned. What is less known about Galen’s study of anatomy, however, is its philosophical (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation