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  1. Engendering Harm: A Critique of Sex Selection For “Family Balancing”.Arianne Shahvisi - 2018 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 15 (1):123-137.
    The most benign rationale for sex selection is deemed to be “family balancing.” On this view, provided the sex distribution of an existing offspring group is “unbalanced,” one may legitimately use reproductive technologies to select the sex of the next child. I present four novel concerns with granting “family balancing” as a justification for sex selection: families or family subsets should not be subject to medicalization; sex selection for “family balancing” entrenches heteronormativity, inflicting harm in at least three specific ways; (...)
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  • Why a Criminal Ban? Analyzing the Arguments Against Somatic Cell Nuclear Transfer in the Canadian Parliamentary Debate.Timothy Caulfield & Tania Bubela - 2007 - American Journal of Bioethics 7 (2):51 – 61.
    Somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) remains a controversial technique, one that has elicited a variety of regulatory responses throughout the world. On March 29, 2005, Canada's Assisted Human Reproduction Act came into force. This law prohibits a number of research activities, including SCNT. Given the pluralistic nature of Canadian society, the creation of this law stands as an interesting case study of the policy-making process and how and why a liberal democracy ends up making the relatively rare decision to use (...)
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  • Sex Selection: Laissez Faire or Family Balancing?Edgar Dahl - 2005 - Health Care Analysis 13 (1):87-90.
    In a recent comment on the HFEA’s public consultation on sex selection, Soren Holm claimed that proponents of family balancing are committed to embrace a laissez faire approach. Given that arguments in support of sex selection for family balancing also support sex selection for other social reasons, advocates of family balancing, he asserts, are simply inconsistent when calling for a limit on access to sex selection. In this paper, I argue that proponents of family balancing are in no way inconsistent. (...)
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  • Attitudes Towards Preconception Sex Selection: A Representative Survey From Germany.Edgar Dahl - 2004 - Reproductive Biomedicine Online 9 (6):600-603.
    Within the next parliamentary term, the German government is expected to replace the current Embryo Protection Act with a new Human Reproductive Technology Act. Before introducing new legislation, policy makers may want to survey public attitudes towards novel applications of reproductive technology. In order to assess opinions and concerns about preconception sex selection for non-medical reasons, a social survey has been conducted in Germany. As a representative sample of the German population, 1005 men and women 18 years and older were (...)
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  • No Country Is An Island.Edgar Dahl - 2005 - Reproductive Biomedicine Online 11 (1):10-11.
    In its recent report Human Reproductive Technologies and the Law, the House of Commons’ Select Committee on Science and Technology insisted that the United Kingdom ‘does not take a purely insular view’ on sex selection but to carefully consider the impact on other countries before allowing changes to current legislation. True, no country is an island, not even the British Isles. Still, outlawing a harmless practice in Great Britain because of its alleged harmful effects in other countries is bad public (...)
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  • Sex Selection: Sorting Sperm As a Gateway to the Sorting Society?Edgar Dahl - 2008 - In Janna Thompson (ed.), The Sorting Society: The Ethics of Genetic Screening and Therapy. Cambridge University Press. pp. 21-35.
    The Sorting Society: The Ethics of Genetic Screening and Therapy. Edited by Loane Skene & Janna Thompson, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge 2008.
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  • Preconception Gender Selection: A Threat to the Natural Sex Ratio?Edgar Dahl - 2005 - Reproductive Biomedicine Online 10 (1):116-118.
    This brief paper summarizes a series of postal investigations on the acceptance of selection for X or Y spermatozoa. These were conducted mainly in Germany but also in the UK, the Netherlands and the US. Selected families were approached with a series of questions about their wish to use sperm selection, and their choice of boys or girls. In general, large majorities opposed this approach for family balancing or sex selection on the basis of cost and inconvenience of the treatment. (...)
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