Switch to: References

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. From Playfulness and Self-Centredness Via Grand Expectations to Normalisation: A Psychoanalytical Rereading of the History of Molecular Genetics. [REVIEW]H. A. E. Zwart - 2013 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 16 (4):775-788.
    In this paper, I will reread the history of molecular genetics from a psychoanalytical angle, analysing it as a case history. Building on the developmental theories of Freud and his followers, I will distinguish four stages, namely: (1) oedipal childhood, notably the epoch of model building (1943–1953); (2) the latency period, with a focus on the development of basic skills (1953–1989); (3) adolescence, exemplified by the Human Genome Project, with its fierce conflicts, great expectations and grandiose claims (1989–2003) and (4) (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • The Art of Mathematics: Bedding Down for a New Era.Tony Brown - 2007 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 39 (7):755-765.
    Comparisons made between art and mathematics so often centre on the beauty of mathematics and how its forms might be seen as aesthetically pleasing. Yet the prominence of beauty as an attribute is less prevalent in contemporary art. Rather, art has a much broader scope of concern, perhaps with a greater emphasis on providing apparatus through which we might better understand who we are. This paper considers some performative aspects of contemporary art and draws parallels with some examples of mathematical (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Social Origins of Cognition: Bartlett, Evolutionary Perspective and Embodied Mind Approach.Akiko Saito - 1996 - Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 26 (4):399–421.
    This paper explores new avenues of research on social bases of cognition and a more adequate framework to conceive the phenomena of the human mind. It firstly examines Bartlett's work on social bases of cognition, from which three pertinent features are identified, namely multi-level analyses, evolutionary perspective and embodied mind approach. It then examines recent works on social origins of cognition in ethology and paleoanthropology, and various forms of the embodied mind approach recently proposed in neuroscience and cognitive science. The (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • The Social Construction of Chronicity – a Key to Understanding Chronic Care Transformations.Carmel M. Martin & Chris Peterson - 2009 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 15 (3):578-585.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • Aspects of Complexity in Life and Science.Claus Emmeche - 1997 - Philosophica 59.
    A short review of complexity research from the perspective of history and philosophy of biology is presented. Complexity and its emergence has scientific and metaphysical meanings. From its beginning, biology was a science of complex systems, but with the advent of electronic computing and the possibility of simulating mathematical models of complicated systems, new intuitions of complexity emerged, together with attempts to devise quantitative measures of complexity. But can we quantify the complex?
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  • What is a Gene? From Molecules to Metaphysics.Holmes Rolston - 2006 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 27 (6):471-497.
    Mendelian genes have become molecular genes, with increasing puzzlement about locating them, due to increasing complexity in genomic webworks. Genome science finds modular and conserved units of inheritance, identified as homologous genes. Such genes are cybernetic, transmitting information over generations; this too requires multi-leveled analysis, from DNA transcription to development and reproduction of the whole organism. Genes are conserved; genes are also dynamic and creative in evolutionary speciation—most remarkably producing humans capable of wondering about what genes are.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Complexity and the Culture of Curriculum.William E. Doll - 2008 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 40 (1):190–212.
    This paper has two main foci: the history of curriculum design, and implications from the new sciences of chaos and complexity for the development of new forms of curriculum design and teaching implementation. Regarding the first focus, the paper posits that there exist—to use Wittgenstein's phrase—‘family resemblances’ between Peter Ramus’ 16th century curriculum design and that of Ralph Tyler in the 20th century. While this 400‐year linkage is by no means linear, there are overlapping strands from Ramus to Comenius to (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • The Last Scientific Revolution.Andrei Kirilyuk - 2008 - In Martín López Corredoira & Carlos Castro Perelman (eds.), Against the Tide: A Critical Review by Scientists of How Physics and Astronomy Get Done. Boca Raton: Universal Publishers. pp. 179-217.
    Critically growing problems of fundamental science organisation and content are analysed with examples from physics and emerging interdisciplinary fields. Their origin is specified and new science structure (organisation and content) is proposed as a unified solution.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • The Art of Mathematics: Bedding Down for a New Era.Tony Brown - 2007 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 39 (7):755–765.
    Comparisons made between art and mathematics so often centre on the beauty of mathematics and how its forms might be seen as aesthetically pleasing. Yet the prominence of beauty as an attribute is less prevalent in contemporary art. Rather, art has a much broader scope of concern, perhaps with a greater emphasis on providing apparatus through which we might better understand who we are. This paper considers some performative aspects of contemporary art and draws parallels with some examples of mathematical (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Do Biosemiotics, But Don’T Forget Semiosis.Anton Markoš - 2009 - Biosemiotics 2 (1):117-119.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Multidisciplinarity, Interdisciplinarity, Transdisciplinarity, and the Sciences.David Alvargonzález - 2011 - International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 25 (4):387-403.
    The ideas of interdisciplinarity and transdisciplinarity have been widely applied to the relationship between sciences. This article is an attempt to discuss the reasons why scientific interdisciplinarity and transdisciplinarity pose specific problems. First of all, certain questions about terminology are taken into account in order to clarify the meaning of the word ?discipline? and its cognates. Secondly, we argue that the specificity of sciences does not lie in becoming disciplines. Then, we focus on the relationship between sciences, and between sciences (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  • Foundations of ArtScience: Formulating the Problem.Francis Heylighen & Katarina Petrović - 2021 - Foundations of Science 26 (2):225-244.
    While art and science still functioned side-by-side during the Renaissance, their methods and perspectives diverged during the nineteenth century, creating a still enduring separation between the "two cultures". Recently, artists and scientists again collaborate more frequently, as promoted most radically by the ArtScience movement. This approach aims at a true synthesis between the intuitive, imaginative methods of art and the rational, rule-governed methods of science. To prepare the grounds for a theoretical synthesis, this paper surveys the fundamental commonalities and differences (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • The Epistemology of Scientific Evidence.Douglas Walton & Nanning Zhang - 2013 - Artificial Intelligence and Law 21 (2):173-219.
    In place of the traditional epistemological view of knowledge as justified true belief we argue that artificial intelligence and law needs an evidence-based epistemology according to which scientific knowledge is based on critical analysis of evidence using argumentation. This new epistemology of scientific evidence (ESE) models scientific knowledge as achieved through a process of marshaling evidence in a scientific inquiry that results in a convergence of scientific theories and research results. We show how a dialogue interface of argument from expert (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • Cybernetic Determinants in the Evolution of Brain and Culture.Nikolai Eberhardt - 2010 - Biological Theory 5 (1):31-39.
    Within a physicalist-mechanistic worldview, in which we cannot be more than intelligent, self-reproducing biomachines or biobots, fundamentals of a new approach to the science of human self-explanation are outlined. Some a priori logical necessities, or determinants, of any biobot’s control system design are recognized. Evolution had to satisfy them, but neuroscience and cognitive science so far do not clearly see these basics. It is concluded that the old part of the brain still contains the genetically fixed drives, responses, and the (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • The Development of Sociobiology in Relation to Animal Behavior Studies, 1946–1975.Clement Levallois - 2018 - Journal of the History of Biology 51 (3):419-444.
    This paper aims at bridging a gap between the history of American animal behavior studies and the history of sociobiology. In the post-war period, ecology, comparative psychology and ethology were all investigating animal societies, using different approaches ranging from fieldwork to laboratory studies. We argue that this disunity in “practices of place” explains the attempts of dialogue between those three fields and early calls for unity through “sociobiology” by J. Paul Scott. In turn, tensions between the naturalist tradition and the (...)
    Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • The Medical Humanities and the Perils of Curricular Integration.Neville Chiavaroli & Constance Ellwood - 2012 - Journal of Medical Humanities 33 (4):245-254.
    The advent of integration as a feature of contemporary medical curricula can be seen as an advantage for the medical humanities in that it provides a clear implementation strategy for the inclusion of medical humanities content and/or perspectives, while also making its relevance to medical education more apparent. This paper discusses an example of integration of humanities content into a graduate medical course, raises questions about the desirability of an exclusively integrated approach, and argues for the value of retaining a (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • The Work of W.D. Hamilton.Richard F. Green - 2000 - Biology and Philosophy 15 (1):107-117.
    W.D. Hamilton, Narrow Roads of Gene Land: The Collected Papers of W.D. Hamilton.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Is Genetic Information Irreducible?Phillip E. Johnson - 1996 - Biology and Philosophy 11 (4):535-538.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • ‘This Ever More Amorphous Thing Called Digital Humanities’: Whither the Humanities Project?Marilyn Deegan - 2014 - Arts and Humanities in Higher Education 13 (1-2):24-41.
    In 2012, Digital Humanities became one of the most talked-about topics in the humanities and was suggested as a movement that could possibly help halt the decline in the traditional humanities. A flurry of books appeared, and AHHE produced two special issues, Digital humanities, digital futures and The necessity of the humanities, in which scholars discuss the value and practice of the humanities in a world that is increasingly digital. This current piece muses on some aspects of the humanities and (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Rastier Revisited: Paradigms in Conflict.Howard Mancing - 2003 - Semiotica 2003 (145).
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Creativity and the New Structure of Science.Andrei Kirilyuk - manuscript
    A qualitatively new, much more liberal and efficient organisation of science is proposed and justified in connection with emerging international science structures, such as the European Research Council, and growing debates about further role and development of fundamental science. Although the ideas are expressed in terms of "common sense" arguments accessible to a "general" audience, they are based on the rigorous analysis within the recently advanced "universal concept of complexity", which can be applied, due to its universality, also to science (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • Complexity and the Culture of Curriculum.William E. Doll - 2008 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 40 (1):190-212.
    This paper has two main foci: the history of curriculum design, and implications from the new sciences of chaos and complexity for the development of new forms of curriculum design and teaching implementation. Regarding the first focus, the paper posits that there exist—to use Wittgenstein's phrase—‘family resemblances’ between Peter Ramus’ 16th century curriculum design and that of Ralph Tyler in the 20th century. While this 400‐year linkage is by no means linear, there are overlapping strands from Ramus to Comenius to (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Caring for Nature: From Fact to Value, From Respect to Reverence.Holmes Rolston - 2004 - Zygon 39 (2):277-302.
    . Despite the classical prohibition of moving from fact to value, encounter with the biodiversity and plenitude of being in evolutionary natural history moves us to respect life, even to reverence it. Darwinian accounts are value-laden and necessary for understanding life at the same time that Darwinian theory fails to provide sufficient cause for the historically developing diversity and increasing complexity on Earth. Earth is a providing ground; matter and energy on Earth support life, but distinctive to life is information (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Hypercitizenship and the Management of Genetic Diversity: Sociology of Law and the Key Systemic Bifurcation Between the Ring Singularity and the Neofeudal Age.Andrea Pitasi - 2012 - World Futures 68 (4-5):314 - 331.
    This article is essentially theoretical and is focused on the allocative function of the legal systems to attract/reject different capitals according to their procedures to shape norms and laws. This function of the legal systems is pivotal in our times as humankind is facing a systemic and evolutionary bifurcation between the heideggerian Gegnet of a strategic, high speed convergence (i.e., Singularity) among robotics, informatics, nanotechnologies, and genetics (RINGs)?which will reshape human life in terms of its life quality styles and standards (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Darwinism and Atheism: A Marriage Made in Heaven?: Ruse Darwinism and Atheism.Michael Ruse - 2004 - Think 2 (6):51-62.
    Richard Dawkins argues both that Darwin's theory made a God-as-the-designer-of-species redundant, and also that the problem of evil provides overwhelming evidence against God's existence. But Michael Ruse suspects Dawkins may be too hasty….
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • What Is Complexity Science? Toward an "Ecology of Ignorance".Will Medd - 2001 - Emergence: Complexity and Organization 3 (1):43-60.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations