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  1. David Hume as a Proto-Weberian: Commerce, Protestantism, and Secular Culture.Margaret Schabas - 2020 - Social Philosophy and Policy 37 (1):190-212.
    David Hume wrote prolifically and influentially on economics and was an enthusiast for the modern commercial era of manufacturing and global trade. As a vocal critic of the Church, and possibly a nonbeliever, Hume positioned commerce at the vanguard of secularism. I here argue that Hume broached ideas that gesture toward those offered by Max Weber in his famous Protestant Ethic and the Spirit of Capitalism. Hume discerned a strong correlation between economic flourishing and Protestantism, and he pointed to a (...)
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  • Hume on Church Establishments, Secular Politics and History.Aaron Szymkowiak - 2017 - Diametros 54:95-117.
    In the third volume of the History of England, David Hume considers the political ramifications of the Protestant reformation with a “Digression concerning the ecclesiastical state.” He advocates the establishment of a state church, believing it will dampen religious “enthusiasm” in the polity. Unlike later secularization theorists, Hume assumes an intractable basis for religion in the human passions. Tensions in Hume’s “cooptation” strategy are evident from Adam Smith’s famous attack upon it in section five of The Wealth of Nations, and (...)
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