Switch to: References

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. What we (Should) Talk about when we Talk about Deep Brain Stimulation and Personal Identity.Robyn Bluhm, Laura Cabrera & Rachel McKenzie - 2020 - Neuroethics 13 (3):289-301.
    A number of reports have suggested that patients who undergo deep brain stimulation may experience changes to their personality or sense of self. These reports have attracted great philosophical interest. This paper surveys the philosophical literature on personal identity and DBS and draws on an emerging empirical literature on the experiences of patients who have undergone this therapy to argue that the existing philosophical discussion of DBS and personal identity frames the problem too narrowly. Much of the discussion by neuroethicists (...)
    Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • Deep Brain Stimulation, Self and Relational Autonomy.Shaun Gallagher - forthcoming - Neuroethics:1-13.
    Questions about the nature of self and self-consciousness are closely aligned with questions about the nature of autonomy. These concepts have deep roots in traditional philosophical discussions that concern metaphysics, epistemology and ethics. They also have direct relevance to practical considerations about informed consent in medical contexts. In this paper, with reference to understanding specific side effects of deep brain stimulation treatment in cases of, for example, Parkinson’s Disease, Obsessive Compulsive Disorder, and Major Depressive Disorder, I’ll argue that it is (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • Changes in Personality Associated with Deep Brain Stimulation: A Qualitative Evaluation of Clinician Perspectives.Cassandra J. Thomson, Rebecca A. Segrave & Adrian Carter - forthcoming - Neuroethics.
    Gilbert et al. argue that the neuroethics literature discussing the putative effects of Deep Brain Stimulation on personality largely ignores the scientific evidence and presents distorted claims that personality change is induced by the DBS stimulation. This study contributes to the first-hand primary research on the topic exploring DBS clinicians’ views on post-DBS personality change among their patients and its underlying cause. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with sixteen clinicians from various disciplines working in Australian DBS practice for movement disorders and/or (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • The Ecological-Enactive Model of Disability: Why Disability Does Not Entail Pathological Embodiment.Juan Toro, Julian Kiverstein & Erik Rietveld - 2020 - Frontiers in Psychology 11.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • An Instrument to Capture the Phenomenology of Implantable Brain Device Use.Frederic Gilbert, Brown, Dasgupta, Martens, Klein & Goering - forthcoming - Neuroethics.
    One important concern regarding implantable Brain Computer Interfaces is the fear that the intervention will negatively change a patient’s sense of identity or agency. In particular, there is concern that the user will be psychologically worse-off following treatment despite postoperative functional improvements. Clinical observations from similar implantable brain technologies, such as deep brain stimulation, show a small but significant proportion of patients report feelings of strangeness or difficulty adjusting to a new concept of themselves characterized by a maladaptive je ne (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Deep Brain Stimulation: Inducing Self-Estrangement.Frederic Gilbert - 2018 - Neuroethics 11 (2):157-165.
    Despite growing evidence that a significant number of patients living with Parkison’s disease experience neuropsychiatric changes following Deep Brain Stimulation treatment, the phenomenon remains poorly understood and largely unexplored in the literature. To shed new light on this phenomenon, we used qualitative methods grounded in phenomenology to conduct in-depth, semi-structured interviews with 17 patients living with Parkinson’s Disease who had undergone DBS. Our study found that patients appear to experience postoperative DBS-induced changes in the form of self-estrangement. Using the insights (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  • Effective Deep Brain Stimulation for Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder Requires Clinical Expertise.Maarten van Westen, Erik Rietveld & Damiaan Denys - 2019 - Frontiers in Psychology 10.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Dynamical Relations in the Self-Pattern.Shaun Gallagher & Anya Daly - 2018 - Frontiers in Psychology 9.
    Abstract: The notion of a self-pattern, as developed in the pattern theory of self, which holds that the self is best explained in terms of the kind of reality that pertains to a dynamical pattern, acknowledges the importance of neural dynamics, but also expands the account of self to extra-neural (embodied and enactive) dynamics. The pattern theory of self, however, has been criticized for failing to explicate the dynamical relations among elements of the self-pattern; as such, it seems to be (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  • DBS and Autonomy: Clarifying the Role of Theoretical Neuroethics.Peter Zuk & Gabriel Lázaro-Muñoz - forthcoming - Neuroethics:1-11.
    In this article, we sketch how theoretical neuroethics can clarify the concept of autonomy. We hope that this can both serve as a model for the conceptual clarification of other components of PIAAAS and contribute to the development of the empirical measures that Gilbert and colleagues [1] propose.
    Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • An Instrument to Capture the Phenomenology of Implantable Brain Device Use.Frederic Gilbert, Brown, Dasgupta, Martens, Klein & Goering - forthcoming - Neuroethics:1-8.
    One important concern regarding implantable Brain Computer Interfaces is the fear that the intervention will negatively change a patient’s sense of identity or agency. In particular, there is concern that the user will be psychologically worse-off following treatment despite postoperative functional improvements. Clinical observations from similar implantable brain technologies, such as deep brain stimulation, show a small but significant proportion of patients report feelings of strangeness or difficulty adjusting to a new concept of themselves characterized by a maladaptive je ne (...)
    Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • The Sense of Agency in OCD.Judit Szalai - 2019 - Review of Philosophy and Psychology 10 (2):363-380.
    This paper proposes an integrated account of the etiology of OCD that accommodates both dysfunctional cognitions and sensorimotor features of compulsive action. It is argued that cognitive/metacognitive theories do not aspire to address all obsessive-compulsive phenomenal properties and that empirical evidence concerning some of these requires the incorporation of motor deficits as an independent factor in a plausible conception of OCD. The difference in agency attribution between obsessive-compulsive persons and schizophrenia patients with delusions of control is also accounted for in (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Deflating the “DBS Causes Personality Changes” Bubble.Frederic Gilbert, J. N. M. Viaña & C. Ineichen - forthcoming - Neuroethics.
    The idea that deep brain stimulation induces changes to personality, identity, agency, authenticity, autonomy and self is so deeply entrenched within neuroethics discourses that it has become an unchallenged narrative. In this article, we critically assess evidence about putative effects of DBS on PIAAAS. We conducted a literature review of more than 1535 articles to investigate the prevalence of scientific evidence regarding these potential DBS-induced changes. While we observed an increase in the number of publications in theoretical neuroethics that mention (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   21 citations  
  • Understanding Phenomenological Differences in How Affordances Solicit Action. An Exploration.Roy Dings - 2018 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 17 (4):681-699.
    Affordances are possibilities for action offered by the environment. Recent research on affordances holds that there are differences in how people experience such possibilities for action. However, these differences have not been properly investigated. In this paper I start by briefly scrutinizing the existing literature on this issue, and then argue for two claims. First, that whether an affordance solicits action or not depends on its relevance to the agent’s concerns. Second, that the experiential character of how an affordance solicits (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • Threats to Neurosurgical Patients Posed by the Personal Identity Debate.Sabine Müller, Merlin Bittlinger & Henrik Walter - 2017 - Neuroethics 10 (2):299-310.
    Decisions about brain surgery pose existential challenges because they are often decisions about life or death, and sometimes about possible personality changes. Therefore they require rigorous neuroethical consideration. However, we doubt whether metaphysical interpretations of ambiguous statements of patients are useful for deriving ethical and legal conclusions. Particularly, we question the application of psychological theories of personal identity on neuroethical issues for several reasons. First, even the putative “standard view” on personal identity is contentious. Second, diverse accounts of personal identity (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations