Switch to: References

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. Information Rights: Trust and Human Dignity in E-Government.Toni Carbo - 2007 - International Review of Information Ethics 7 (9):1-7.
    The words ―Rights,‖ ―Trust,‖ ―Human Dignity,‖ and even ―Government‖ have widely varying meanings and connotations, differing across time, languages and cultures. Concepts of rights, trust, and human dignity have been examined for centuries in great depth by ethicists and other philosophers and by religious think-ers, and more recently by social scientists and, especially as related to information, by information scientists. Similarly, discussions of government are well documented in writings back to Plato and Aristotle, with investi-gations of electronic government dating back (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Responsibility of and Trust in ISPs.Raphael Cohen-Almagor - 2010 - Knowledge, Technology & Policy 23 (3):381-397.
    This discussion is about the neglected concepts of trust and social responsibility on the Internet. I will discuss and explain the concepts and their implications to people and society. I then address the issue of moral and social responsibilities of ISPs and web-hosting companies. I argue that ISPs and web-hosting companies should aspire to take responsibility for content and that they should respect and abide by their own terms of conduct.
    Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Online Diaries: Reflections on Trust, Privacy, and Exhibitionism. [REVIEW]Paul B. de Laat - 2008 - Ethics and Information Technology 10 (1):57-69.
    Trust between transaction partners in cyberspace has come to be considered a distinct possibility. In this article the focus is on the conditions for its creation by way of assuming, not inferring trust. After a survey of its development over the years (in the writings of authors like Luhmann, Baier, Gambetta, and Pettit), this mechanism of trust is explored in a study of personal journal blogs. After a brief presentation of some technicalities of blogging and authors’ motives for writing their (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  • Cognitive Revolution, Virtuality and Good Life.Gordana Dodig-Crnkovic - 2013 - AI and Society 28 (3):319-327.
    We are living in an era when the focus of human relationships with the world is shifting from execution and physical impact to control and cognitive/informational interaction. This emerging, increasingly informational world is our new ecology, an infosphere that presents the grounds for a cognitive revolution based on interactions in networks of biological and artificial, intelligent agents. After the industrial revolution, which extended the human body through mechanical machinery, the cognitive revolution extends the human mind/cognition through information-processing machinery. These novel (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Pernicious Virtual Communities: Identity, Polarisation and the Web 2. [REVIEW]Mitch Parsell - 2008 - Ethics and Information Technology 10 (1):41-56.
    The importance of online social spaces is growing. New Web 2.0 resources allow the creation of social networks by any netizen with minimal technical skills. These communities can be extremely narrowly focussed. In this paper, I identify two potential costs of membership in narrowly focussed virtual communities. First, that narrowly focussed communities can polarise attitudes and prejudices leading to increased social cleavage and division. Second, that they can lead sick individuals to revel in their illness, deliberately indulging in their disease (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  • How Can Contributors to Open-Source Communities Be Trusted? On the Assumption, Inference, and Substitution of Trust.Paul B. de Laat - 2010 - Ethics and Information Technology 12 (4):327-341.
    Open-source communities that focus on content rely squarely on the contributions of invisible strangers in cyberspace. How do such communities handle the problem of trusting that strangers have good intentions and adequate competence? This question is explored in relation to communities in which such trust is a vital issue: peer production of software (FreeBSD and Mozilla in particular) and encyclopaedia entries (Wikipedia in particular). In the context of open-source software, it is argued that trust was inferred from an underlying ‘hacker (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  • How Can Contributors to Open-Source Communities Be Trusted? On the Assumption, Inference, and Substitution of Trust.Paul B. Laat - 2010 - Ethics and Information Technology 12 (4):327-341.
    Open-source communities that focus on content rely squarely on the contributions of invisible strangers in cyberspace. How do such communities handle the problem of trusting that strangers have good intentions and adequate competence? This question is explored in relation to communities in which such trust is a vital issue: peer production of software (FreeBSD and Mozilla in particular) and encyclopaedia entries (Wikipedia in particular). In the context of open-source software, it is argued that trust was inferred from an underlying ‘hacker (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations