Switch to: References

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. Nurses' Attitudes to Euthanasia: The Influence of Empirical Studies and Methodological Concerns on Nursing Practice.Janet Holt - 2008 - Nursing Philosophy 9 (4):257-272.
    This paper introduces the controversy surrounding active voluntary euthanasia and describes the legal position on euthanasia and assisted suicide in the UK. Findings from studies of the nurses' attitudes to euthanasia from the national and international literature are reviewed. There are acknowledged difficulties in carrying out research into attitudes to euthanasia and hence the review of findings from the published studies is followed by a methodological review. This methodological review examines the research design and data collection methods used in the (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • Patient-Centred Care: Qualitative Findings on Health Professionals' Understanding of Ethics in Acute Medicine. [REVIEW]Pam McGrath, David Henderson & Hamish Holewa - 2006 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 3 (3):149-160.
    In recent years the literature on bioethics has begun to pose the sociological challenge of how to explore organisational processes that facilitate a systemic response to ethical concerns. The present discussion seeks to make a contribution to this important new direction in ethical research by presenting findings from an Australian pilot study. The research was initiated by the Clinical Ethics Committee of Redland Hospital at Bayside Health Service District in Queensland, Australia, and explores health professionals’ understanding of the nature of (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • Beyond the Equivalence Thesis: How to Think About the Ethics of Withdrawing and Withholding Life-Saving Medical Treatment.Nathan Emmerich & Bert Gordijn - 2019 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 40 (1):21-41.
    With few exceptions, the literature on withdrawing and withholding life-saving treatment considers the bare fact of withdrawing or withholding to lack any ethical significance. If anything, the professional guidelines on this matter are even more uniform. However, while no small degree of progress has been made toward persuading healthcare professionals to withhold treatments that are unlikely to provide significant benefit, it is clear that a certain level of ambivalence remains with regard to withdrawing treatment. Given that the absence of clinical (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • A Morally Permissible Moral Mistake? Reinterpreting a Thought Experiment as Proof of Concept.Nathan Emmerich & Bert Gordjin - 2018 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 15 (2):269-278.
    This paper takes the philosophical notion of suberogatory acts or morally permissible moral mistakes and, via a reinterpretation of a thought experiment from the medical ethics literature, offers an initial demonstration of their relevance to the field of medical ethics. That is, at least in regards to this case, we demonstrate that the concept of morally permissible moral mistakes has a bearing on medical decision-making. We therefore suggest that these concepts may have broader importance for the discourse on medical ethics (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • The Operationalisation of Religion and World View in Surveys of Nurses' Attitudes Toward Euthanasia and Assisted Suicide.Joris Gielen, Stef Van den Branden & Bert Broeckaert - 2009 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 12 (4):423-431.
    Most quantitative studies that survey nurses’ attitudes toward euthanasia and/or assisted suicide, also attempt to assess the influence of religion on these attitudes. We wanted to evaluate the operationalisation of religion and world view in these surveys. In the Pubmed database we searched for relevant articles published before August 2008 using combinations of search terms. Twenty-eight relevant articles were found. In five surveys nurses were directly asked whether religious beliefs, religious practices and/or ideological convictions influenced their attitudes, or the respondents (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • How Can One Be Both a Philosophical Ethicist and a Democrat?Malcolm Oswald - 2013 - Health Care Analysis (1):1-10.
    How can one be both a philosophical ethicist and a democrat? In this article I conclude that it can be difficult to reconcile the two roles. One involves understanding, and reconciling, the conflicting views of citizens, and the other requires the pursuit of truth through reason. Nevertheless, an important function of philosophy and ethics is to inform and improve policy. If done effectively, we could expect better, and more just, laws and policies, thereby benefiting many lives. So applying philosophical thinking (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Perceptions of Medical Providers on Morality and Decision-Making Capacity in Withholding and Withdrawing Life-Sustaining Treatment and Suicide.Thomas D. Harter, Erin L. Sterenson, Andrew Borgert & Cary Rasmussen - forthcoming - AJOB Empirical Bioethics:1-29.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Ought Conscientious Refusals to Implement Reverse Triage Decisions Be Accommodated?Nathan Emmerich - 2020 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 17 (4):783-787.
    Although one can argue that they do not represent a radical departure from existing practices, protocols for reverse triage certainly step beyond what is ordinarily done in medicine and healthcare. Nevertheless, there seems to be some degree of moral concern regarding the ethical legitimacy of practicing reverse triage in the context of a pandemic. Such concern can be taken as a reflection of the moral antipathy some exhibit towards current practices of withdrawing treatment—that is, when withdrawal of treatment is arguably (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Which Newborn Infants Are Too Expensive to Treat? Camosy and Rationing in Intensive Care.Dominic Wilkinson - 2013 - Journal of Medical Ethics 39 (8):502-506.
    Are there some newborn infants whose short- and long-term care costs are so great that treatment should not be provided and they should be allowed to die? Public discourse and academic debate about the ethics of newborn intensive care has often shied away from this question. There has been enough ink spilt over whether or when for the infant's sake it might be better not to provide life-saving treatment. The further question of not saving infants because of inadequate resources has (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Too Soon to Give Up: Re-Examining the Value of Advance Directives.Benjamin H. Levi & Michael J. Green - 2010 - American Journal of Bioethics 10 (4):3 – 22.
    In the face of mounting criticism against advance directives, we describe how a novel, computer-based decision aid addresses some of these important concerns. This decision aid, Making Your Wishes Known: Planning Your Medical Future , translates an individual's values and goals into a meaningful advance directive that explicitly reflects their healthcare wishes and outlines a plan for how they wish to be treated. It does this by (1) educating users about advance care planning; (2) helping individuals identify, clarify, and prioritize (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations