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  1. Strategies for Teaching Professional Ethics to IT Engineering Degree Students and Evaluating the Result.Rafael Miñano, Ángel Uruburu, Ana Moreno-Romero & Diego Pérez-López - 2017 - Science and Engineering Ethics 23 (1):263-286.
    This paper presents an experience in developing professional ethics by an approach that integrates knowledge, teaching methodologies and assessment coherently. It has been implemented for students in both the Software Engineering and Computer Engineering degree programs of the Technical University of Madrid, in which professional ethics is studied as a part of a required course. Our contribution of this paper is a model for formative assessment that clarifies the learning goals, enhances the results, simplifies the scoring and can be replicated (...)
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  • Editors' Overview Perspectives on Teaching Social Responsibility to Students in Science and Engineering.Henk Zandvoort, Tom Børsen, Michael Deneke & Stephanie J. Bird - 2013 - Science and Engineering Ethics 19 (4):1413-1438.
    Global society is facing formidable current and future problems that threaten the prospects for justice and peace, sustainability, and the well-being of humanity both now and in the future. Many of these problems are related to science and technology and to how they function in the world. If the social responsibility of scientists and engineers implies a duty to safeguard or promote a peaceful, just and sustainable world society, then science and engineering education should empower students to fulfil this responsibility. (...)
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  • Broadening Engineering Education: Bringing the Community In.Eddie Conlon - 2013 - Science and Engineering Ethics 19 (4):1589-1594.
    Two issues of particular interest in the Irish context are (1) the motivation for broadening engineering education to include the humanities, and an emphasis on social responsibility and (2) the process by which broadening can take place. Greater community engagement, arising from a socially-driven model of engineering education, is necessary if engineering practice is to move beyond its present captivity by corporate interests.
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